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Cancer

Cover image for Cancer

15 June 2004

Volume 100, Issue 12

Pages 2491–2682

  1. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Correspondence
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      Vascular-targeting therapies for treatment of malignant disease (pages 2491–2499)

      Dietmar W. Siemann, David J. Chaplin and Michael R. Horsman

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20299

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      A tumor's critical dependence on its supportive vasculature for survival, growth, and spread provides unique opportunities for novel therapeutic approaches directed against the existing tumor blood vessel network. Agents that disrupt existing tumor blood vessels have proven to be effective in inducing vascular shutdown and tumor necrosis and in enhancing the efficacy of conventional anticancer therapy.

  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Correspondence
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
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      Measuring social impacts of breast carcinoma treatment in Chinese women : The Chinese Social Adjustment Scale (pages 2500–2511)

      Richard Fielding and Wendy W. T. Lam

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20303

      A 33-item scale consisting of 5 subscales (Relationships with Family, Self-Image, Relationships with Friends, Social Enjoyment, and Attractiveness & Sexuality) was validated in a trial involving 367 Chinese women in Hong Kong who had undergone surgery for breast carcinoma 1 month earlier. The validity, reliability, and sensitivity of the scale were found to be good. The authors conclude that this instrument exhibited good criterion validity in the population that was investigated.

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      Proceedings of the Consensus Conference on Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Carcinoma of the Breast, April 26–28, 2003, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (pages 2512–2532)

      Gordon F. Schwartz, Gabriel N. Hortobagyi and Consensus Conference Committee

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20298

      A consensus conference regarding the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with carcinoma of the breast was held in April 2003 in Philadelphia to review the evidence in support of this form of treatment, discuss the issues related to its routine application, and establish more formal guidelines for its use in patients with all stages of breast carcinoma.

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      Racial differences in the expression of cell cycle–regulatory proteins in breast carcinoma : Study of young African American and white women in Atlanta, Georgia (pages 2533–2542)

      Peggy L. Porter, Mary Jo Lund, Ming Gang Lin, Xiaopu Yuan, Jonathan M. Liff, Elaine W. Flagg, Ralph J. Coates and J. William Eley

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20279

      A population-based case–control study was conducted in Atlanta, Georgia, with centralized pathology review and testing. Compared with white women, young African-American women had greater odds of having aggressive breast tumors with abnormal cell cycle–regulatory protein expression, even after adjustment for disease stage and patient age.

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      αB-crystallin as a marker of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma (pages 2543–2548)

      Dina Chelouche-Lev, Harriet M. Kluger, Aaron J. Berger, David L. Rimm and Janet E. Price

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20304

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      The authors observed a strong association between high expression levels of the small heat-shock protein αB-crystallin in primary breast carcinoma specimens and lymph node involvement. Further studies will be needed to prospectively elucidate the role of αB-crystallin as a clinical prognostic marker in local and locally advanced breast carcinoma.

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      Prospective evaluation of a novel approach for the use of a quantitative galactose oxidase–Schiff reaction in ductal fluid samples from women with breast carcinoma (pages 2549–2554)

      Anees Chagpar, Michael Evelegh, Herbert A. Fritsche Jr., Savitri Krishnamurthy, Kelly K. Hunt and Henry M. Kuerer

      Version of Record online: 11 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20311

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      The galactose oxidase–Schiff reaction yields positive results in many epithelial malignancies, but the utility of this assay is limited by the subjective interpretation of color. Thethors developed a novel quantitative assessment of this reaction for testing nipple aspirate fluid samples and demonstrated the ability of this assessment to differentiate between tissue samples from malignant breast and tissue samples from healthy breast in patients with breast carcinoma.

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      Sentinel lymph node biopsy using periareolar injection of radiocolloid for patients with neoadjuvant chemotherapy–treated breast carcinoma (pages 2555–2561)

      Kenzo Shimazu, Yasuhiro Tamaki, Tetsuya Taguchi, Kenji Akazawa, Tomoo Inoue and Shinzaburo Noguchi

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20242

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      Sentinel lymph node biopsy performed after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) using periareolar injection of radiocolloid was feasible and accurately predicted axillary lymph node status in patients with breast carcinoma who had clinically negative axillary lymph nodes both before and after NAC.

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      Clonality of lobular carcinoma in situ and synchronous invasive lobular carcinoma (pages 2562–2572)

      E. Shelley Hwang, Sarah J. Nyante, Yunn Yi Chen, Dan Moore, Sandy DeVries, James E. Korkola, Laura J. Esserman and Frederic M. Waldman

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20273

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      Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) of the breast is considered a marker for increased risk of carcinoma in both the ipsilateral and contralateral breast. The authors explored the genomic relation between LCIS and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) using the technique of array-based comparative genomic hybridization. A clonal correlation between LCIS and ILC was found, supporting a precursor-product correlation for LCIS and ILC. These findings support the proposition that LCIS is more than a marker for increased breast carcinoma risk.

    8. Genitourinary Disease
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      Does pT2b prostate carcinoma exist? Critical appraisal of the 2002 TNM classification of prostate carcinoma (pages 2573–2576)

      Lori E. Eichelberger and Liang Cheng

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20305

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      Taking into consideration the average weight of prostate specimens (38 g), as well as the predominance of tumor multifocality, it would be unusual to identify tumors involving greater than one-half of 1 lobe (approximately an 8-cm3 tumor), without involving the other lobe. The current study did not support a distinct subclassification for tumors occupying greater than one-half of a single lobe, but fewer than 2 lobes (pT2b). The authors questioned the existence of a true pT2b tumor.

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      Pathologic T1 clear cell renal cell carcinoma: Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor expression and disease-specific survival (pages 2577–2582)

      Alexander S. Parker, John C. Cheville, Michael L. Blute, Todd Igel, Christine M. Lohse and James R. Cerhan

      Version of Record online: 11 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20322

      The expression of insulin-like growth factor I receptor was associated with poor survival in patients who were diagnosed with early-stage clear cell renal cell carcinoma, especially among those with high-grade disease.

    10. Hematologic Malignancies
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      Fludarabine and mitoxantrone for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (pages 2583–2591)

      Apostolia M. Tsimberidou, Michael J. Keating, Francis J. Giles, William G. Wierda, Alessandra Ferrajoli, Susan Lerner, Miloslav Beran, Michael Andreeff, Hagop M. Kantarjian and Susan O'Brien

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20264

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      In a cohort of 88 patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who were treated with a regimen containing fludarabine and mitoxantrone (FN), response rates were 83% in previously untreated patients, 87% in patients who were treated previously with alkylating agents, 50% in patients who had disease that was not refractory to fludarabine at the start of therapy, and 25% in patients who had disease that was refractory to fludarabine. With a median follow-up of 8 years for surviving patients, the median progression-free survival was 24 months for all patients and 34 months for previously untreated patients, the median overall survival was 40 months, and the median survival of previously untreated patients was 88 months. The FN regimen was not superior to fludarabine alone in patients with B-cell CLL.

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      Granulocyte–colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim) may overcome imatinib-induced neutropenia in patients with chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (pages 2592–2597)

      Alfonso Quintas-Cardama, Hagop Kantarjian, Susan O'Brien, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, Mary B. Rios, Moshe Talpaz and Jorge Cortes

      Version of Record online: 7 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20285

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      The authors investigated the use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (filgrastim) as treatment for imatinib mesylate–associated neutropenia in patients with chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia. Their findings indicated that filgrastim improved neutrophil counts and allowed more-sustained administration of imatinib, which may improve response to treatment in some patients.

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      DNA-methylation analysis identifies the E-cadherin gene as a potential marker of disease progression in patients with monoclonal gammopathies (pages 2598–2606)

      Sonja Seidl, Jutta Ackermann, Hannes Kaufmann, Andrea Keck, Thomas Nösslinger, Christoph C. Zielinski, Johannes Drach and Sabine Zöchbauer-Müller

      Version of Record online: 7 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20295

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      Methylation of certain tumor suppressor genes frequently can be detected in monoclonal gammopathies. Methylation of the E-cadherin gene may be a marker of disease progression in patients with multiple myeloma and patients with plasma cell leukemia.

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      Comparison of high-dose melphalan with a more intensive regimen of thiotepa, busulfan, and cyclophosphamide for patients with multiple myeloma (pages 2607–2612)

      Athanasios Anagnostopoulos, Ana Aleman, Gregory Ayers, Michele Donato, Richard Champlin, Donna Weber, Raymond Alexanian and Sergio Giralt

      Version of Record online: 11 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20294

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      In the current study, the authors investigated patients with myeloma who received high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support. Comparison of the outcomes associated with high-dose melphalan (HDM) and a more intensive regimen of thiotepa, busulfan, and cyclophosphamide revealed that progression-free survival and overall survival were similar in both treatment groups. HDM should continue to be considered the standard preparative regimen for patients with myeloma.

    14. Lung Disease
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      Long-term efficacy and safety of zoledronic acid in the treatment of skeletal metastases in patients with nonsmall cell lung carcinoma and other solid tumors : A randomized, Phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (pages 2613–2621)

      Lee S. Rosen, David Gordon, N. Simon Tchekmedyian, Ronald Yanagihara, Vera Hirsh, Maciej Krzakowski, Marek Pawlicki, Paul de Souza, Ming Zheng, Gladys Urbanowitz, Dirk Reitsma, John Seaman and On behalf of the Zoledronic Acid Lung Cancer and Other Solid Tumors Study Group

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20308

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      Zoledronic acid (at a dose of 4 mg intravenously) or placebo was administered every 3 weeks for 21 months in patients with bone metastases secondary to lung carcinoma and other solid tumors except carcinomas of the breast or prostate to determine its long-term safety and efficacy in the prevention of skeletal-related events (SREs). In this randomized, placebo-controlled trial, zoledronic acid was found to be safe and well tolerated and significantly delayed the onset of SREs, reduced the annual incidence of SREs, and reportedly reduced the risk of developing an SRE by 31% compared with placebo.

    15. Neuro-Oncology
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      Preferential brain locations of low-grade gliomas : Comparison with glioblastomas and review of hypothesis (pages 2622–2626)

      Hugues Duffau and Laurent Capelle

      Version of Record online: 23 APR 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20297

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      A comparative study between brain locations of low-grade gliomas (LGGs) and de novo glioblastomas suggests that LGGs are preferentially situated in “secondary” functional areas, especially within the supplementary motor area and the insular lobe. These findings may be explained by developmental, cytomyeloarchitectonic, neurochemical, metabolic, and functional reasons and may improve understanding of the genesis and natural history of these tumors and, eventually, their management.

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      Human immunodeficiency virus–related primary central nervous system lymphoma : Factors influencing survival in 111 patients (pages 2627–2636)

      Mark E. Newell, Jennifer F. Hoy, Stephen G. Cooper, Bernadette DeGraaff, Andrew E. Grulich, Melissa Bryant, Jeremy L. Millar, Bruce J. Brew and David I. Quinn

      Version of Record online: 14 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20300

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      The authors evaluated factors influencing survival in patients diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Highly active antiretroviral therapy and treatment with radiotherapy to ≥ 30 Gray were found to improve the survival of patients with this condition.

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      Increasing the dosage of vincristine : A clinical and pharmacokinetic study of continuous-infusion vincristine in children with central nervous system tumors (pages 2637–2643)

      Stewart J. Kellie, Pauline Koopmans, John Earl, Christa Nath, Derek Roebuck, Donald R. A. Uges and Siebold S. N. de Graaf

      Version of Record online: 7 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20220

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      The cytotoxic activity of vincristine is influenced by extracellular concentration and duration of exposure. Dose-limiting neurotoxicity prevents bolus-dose escalation. The authors demonstrated that high-dose vincristine delivered via continuous infusion is both safe and feasible.

    18. Sarcoma
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      The changing pattern of Kaposi sarcoma in patients with HIV, 1994–2003 : The EuroSIDA study (pages 2644–2654)

      Amanda Mocroft, Ole Kirk, Nathan Clumeck, Panaglotis Gargalianos-Kakolyris, Hanna Trocha, Nelly Chentsova, Francisco Antunes, Hans-Jürgen Stellbrink, Andrew N. Phillips and Jens D. Lundgren

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20309

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      At present, the incidence of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus is less than 10% of the incidence reported in 1994. Nonetheless, KS continues to represent the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining condition in approximately 6% of all AIDS diagnoses. Most individuals who developed KS while receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) had low CD4 cell counts when they began receiving this treatment and developed KS within 6 months of the initiation of HAART. There continues to be an increased incidence of KS among homosexual men and a greatly reduced incidence of KS among patients with higher CD4 counts.

    19. Discipline

      Diagnostic Imaging
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      The role of preoperative endorectal magnetic resonance imaging in the decision regarding whether to preserve or resect neurovascular bundles during radical retropubic prostatectomy (pages 2655–2663)

      Hedvig Hricak, Liang Wang, David C. Wei, Fergus V. Coakley, Oguz Akin, Victor E. Reuter, Mithat Gonen, Michael W. Kattan, Chinyere N. Onyebuchi and Peter T. Scardino

      Version of Record online: 11 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20319

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      In this prospective, cross-sectional study of 135 patients with clinical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathological correlation, MRI was found to significantly improve the surgeon's decision regarding whether to preserve or resect the neurovascular bundle (NVB) during radical retropubic prostatectomy. The areas under the ROC curve were 0.741 for pre-MRI and 0.832 for post-MRI surgical planning (P < 0.01).

    20. Medical Oncology
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      Gemcitabine-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (pages 2664–2670)

      Benjamin D. Humphreys, Jeff P. Sharman, Joel M. Henderson, Jeffrey W. Clark, Peter W. Marks, Helmut G. Rennke, Andrew X. Zhu and Colm C. Magee

      Version of Record online: 14 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20290

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      Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a severe, sometimes life-threatening complication of long-term therapy with gemcitabine. The authors evaluated the clinical course, cumulative incidence, and outcome of gemcitabine-associated TMA in nine patients treated between 1997 and 2002. They calculated a cumulative incidence of 0.31% and determined that new or exacerbated hypertension during treatment could be an early marker for a developing gemcitabine-associated TMA syndrome.

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      A phase I study of sequential administration of escalating doses of intravenous paclitaxel, oral topotecan, and fixed-dose oral etoposide in patients with solid tumors (pages 2671–2679)

      Caio M. S. Rocha Lima, Carlo V. Catapano, Daniel Pacheco, Carol A. Sherman, Greg Oakhill, Chaudhry Mushtaq, Kimberly D. Freeman and Mark R. Green

      Version of Record online: 14 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20330

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      The dose-limiting toxicity and maximum tolerated dose associated with intravenous paclitaxel, oral topotecan, and fixed-dose oral etoposide were determined. A follow-up Cancer and Leukemia Group B Phase II trial involving patients with small cell lung carcinoma is currently being performed. Peripheral blood lymphocyte topoisomerase I levels appeared to rise 24 hours after the administration of paclitaxel.

  3. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Correspondence
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    2. You have free access to this content
      Author reply (page 2681)

      Shelagh I. Dawson

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20293

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      Author reply (page 2682)

      Hiram S. Cody III

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20414

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