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Cancer

Cover image for Cancer

15 October 2004

Volume 101, Issue 8

Pages 1703–1921

  1. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Erratum
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      Assessing the impact of cancer on work outcomes : What are the research needs? (pages 1703–1711)

      John F. Steiner, Tia A. Cavender, Deborah S. Main and Cathy J. Bradley

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20564

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      Cancer may have a major impact on the capacity of survivors to work, with important economic, personal, and social implications. In this commentary, the authors identify six methodologic criteria for evaluating the return-to-work literature for cancer survivors, and they propose a conceptual model to guide future research.

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      Under use of necessary care among cancer survivors (pages 1712–1719)

      Craig C. Earle and Bridget A. Neville

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20560

      Cancer survivorship was associated with a decreased likelihood of receiving recommended noncancer care across a broad range of chronic medical conditions for a large cohort of colorectal carcinoma survivors.

  2. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Erratum
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      Epoetin alfa improves quality of life in patients with cancer : Results of a metaanalysis (pages 1720–1732)

      Michael Jones, Brad Schenkel, Julie Just and Lesley Fallowfield

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20569

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      The results of this metaanalysis of data from 11,459 patients from 23 trials showed that the use of epoetin alfa reduces anemia in patients with cancer and improves quality of life.

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      Potential role of molecularly targeted therapy in the management of advanced nonsmall cell lung carcinoma in the elderly (pages 1733–1744)

      Cesare Gridelli, Erminia Massarelli, Paolo Maione, Antonio Rossi, Roy S. Herbst, Amir Onn and Fortunato Ciardiello

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20572

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      Elderly patients do not tolerate chemotherapy as well as their younger counterparts do, and thus the majority of elderly patients with cancer do not receive aggressive treatment. Consequently, molecularly targeted therapy regimens, because of their favorable toxicity profiles, are of potential value in the treatment of elderly patients with advanced nonsmall cell lung carcinoma.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Erratum
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
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      Mammographic tumor features can predict long-term outcomes reliably in women with 1–14-mm invasive breast carcinoma : Suggestions for the reconsideration of current therapeutic practice and the TNM classification system (pages 1745–1759)

      Laszlo Tabar, Hsiu-Hsi Tony Chen, M. F. Amy Yen, Tibor Tot, Tao-Hsin Tung, Li-Sheng Chen, Yueh-Hsia Chiu, Stephen W. Duffy and Robert A. Smith

      Article first published online: 31 AUG 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20582

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      Greater than 55% of screen-detected invasive breast carcinomas are in the 1–14-mm size range. Classifying the mammographic appearance of these tumors further into five separate categories, the authors identified indicators with important prognostic and therapeutic implications.

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      Central nervous system metastases in patients with high-risk breast carcinoma after multimodality treatment (pages 1760–1766)

      Ana M. Gonzalez-Angulo, Massimo Cristofanilli, Eric A. Strom, Aman U. Buzdar, Shu-Wan Kau, Kristine R. Broglio, Terry L. Smith and Gabriel N. Hortobagyi

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20530

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      The authors retrospectively reviewed the incidence of central nervous system metastases and examined associated disease characteristics in a group of patients with high-risk (locally advanced or inflammatory) breast carcinoma.

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      The neutrophil, not the tumor : Serum CA 15-3 elevation as a result of granulocyte—Colony-stimulating factor–induced neutrophil MUC1 overexpression and neutrophilia in patients with breast carcinoma receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (pages 1767–1775)

      George Pentheroudakis, Vassiliki Malamou-Mitsi, Evangelos Briasoulis, Konstantina Damala, Amalia Vassou, George Vartholomatos, Nikos Kolaitis and Nikolas Pavlidis

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20581

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      Patients with resected breast carcinoma who received granulocyte—colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)–supported adjuvant chemotherapy exhibited an increase in serum CA 15-3 levels. The authors investigated the role of G-CSF-induced neutrophil MUC1 expression in this setting.

    4. Gastrointestinal Tract
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      2-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography imaging is predictive of pathologic response and survival after preoperative chemoradiation in patients with esophageal carcinoma (pages 1776–1785)

      Stephen G. Swisher, Jeremy Erasmus, Mary Maish, Arlene M. Correa, Homer Macapinlac, Jaffer A. Ajani, James D. Cox, Ritsuko R. Komaki, David Hong, Hoon K. Lee, Joe B. Putnam Jr., David C. Rice, W. Roy Smythe, Linh Thai, Ara A. Vaporciyan, Garrett L. Walsh, Tsung-Teh Wu and Jack A. Roth

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20585

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      2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging after preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and before resection appears to be predictive of pathologic response, tumor viability, and overall survival in patients with esophageal carcinoma. However, it cannot distinguish between those patients with microscopic residual disease and complete responders. Therefore, esophagectomy remains a therapeutic option, even if the post-CRT FDG-PET scan is normal.

    5. Genitourinary Disease
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      Genomic analysis of prostate carcinoma specimens obtained via ultrasound-guided needle biopsy may be of use in preoperative decision-making (pages 1786–1793)

      Manuel R. Teixeira, Franclim R. Ribeiro, Mette Eknæs, Håkon Wæhre, Anna E. Stenwig, Karl E. Giercksky, Sverre Heim and Ragnhild A. Lothe

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20527

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      The detection of abnormal prostate-specific antigen levels typically is followed by ultrasound-guided needle biopsy. Thus, in an effort to identify genetic markers that augment the information provided by standard histopathologic classification, the authors tested the feasibility of using these minute biopsy samples for genomic profiling via chromosome banding analysis and comparative genomic hybridization. The number of genomic imbalances and losses at 16q were found to be significantly associated with more poorly differentiated subtypes of prostate carcinoma, whereas gains at 8q and losses at 16q were found to be significantly correlated with clinically advanced disease.

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      Prognostic significance of serum osteoprotegerin levels in patients with bladder carcinoma (pages 1794–1802)

      Yoichi Mizutani, Hiroki Matsubara, Kosuke Yamamoto, Yong Nan Li, Kazuya Mikami, Koji Okihara, Akihiro Kawauchi, Benjamin Bonavida and Tsuneharu Miki

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20550

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      Based on their analysis of 185 serum samples, the authors concluded that serum osteoprotegerin levels may serve as a useful prognostic parameter for patients with bladder carcinoma. In addition, the findings made in the current study suggest a potential role for osteoprotegerin as a molecular target in the treatment of this malignancy.

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      Prognostic value of p53 and MIB-1 in transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder with regional lymph node involvement (pages 1803–1808)

      Igor Frank, John C. Cheville, Michael L. Blute, Christine M. Lohse, R. Jeffrey Karnes, Amy L. Weaver, Thomas J. Sebo, Ajay Nehra and Horst Zincke

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20567

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      p53 and MIB-1 were not associated with disease-related outcomes in patients with lymph node-positive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. Adjuvant chemotherapy appeared to be effective regardless of p53 status. MIB-1 may prove useful in predicting response to chemotherapy.

    8. Head and Neck Disease
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      Pretreatment probability model for predicting outcome after intraarterial chemoradiation for advanced head and neck carcinoma (pages 1809–1817)

      Guido B. van den Broek, Coen R. N. Rasch, Frank A. Pameijer, Ellen Peter, Michiel W. M. van den Brekel, I. Bing Tan, Jan H. Schornagel, Josien A. de Bois, Lambert J. Zijp and Alfons J. M. Balm

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20556

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      Chemoradiation is being used increasingly to treat patients with squamous cell carcinoma. Patients with advanced-stage head and neck carcinoma who are unlikely to be cured with this intense treatment should preferably be identified before treatment. In the current study, two nomograms based on clinical prognostic variables were constructed to determine the probability of local control and survival for individual patients.

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      Biweekly paclitaxel, cisplatin, tegafur, and leucovorin as neoadjuvant chemotherapy for unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (pages 1818–1823)

      Hung-Ming Wang, Chun-Ta Liao, Tung-Chieh Joseph Chang, Jen-Shi Chen, Cuang-Chi Liaw, I-How Chen and Ngan-Ming Tsang

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20561

      The relatively low toxicities and encouraging response rates of paclitaxel/cisplatin/tegafur/leucovorin demonstrated in advanced unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck merits future trials in the setting of resectable tumors with more favorable characteristics.

    10. Hematologic Malignancies
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      The clinical value of tumor burden at diagnosis in Hodgkin lymphoma (pages 1824–1834)

      Paolo G. Gobbi, Chiara Broglia, Giuseppe Di Giulio, Monica Mantelli, Paola Anselmo, Francesco Merli, Pier L. Zinzani, Gabriele Rossi, Vincenzo Callea, Emilio Iannitto, Marco Paulli, Lorena Garioni and Edoardo Ascari

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20568

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      In this study, the authors found that the tumor burden present at diagnosis in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma could be measured (even retrospectively) from a careful evaluation of the staging computed tomography scans. The predictive power of this measured tumor burden was very strong, in that it had greater predictive power compared with each of the hitherto tested, single prognostic factors and multiple indices; moreover, definite and specific limits of tumor burden seemed to emerge for the effectiveness of some treatment protocols.

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      Gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin in patients with recurrent or refractory aggressive histology B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma : A Phase II study by the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group (NCIC-CTG) (pages 1835–1842)

      Michael Crump, Tara Baetz, Stephen Couban, Andrew Belch, Deborah Marcellus, Kang Howson-Jan, Kevin Imrie, Robert Myers, Grenfell Adams, Keyue Ding, Nancy Paul, Lois Shepherd, Jose Iglesias and Ralph Meyer

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20587

      In the current study, gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2 intravenously [i.v.] on Days 1 and 8), dexamethasone (40 mg orally on Days 1–4), and cisplatin (75 mg/m2 i.v. on Day 1) was an active regimen in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and was administered with acceptable toxicity to outpatients. A Phase III trial comparing this regimen with standard cisplatin-based chemotherapy is now ongoing through the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group.

    12. Neuro-Oncology
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      Late-delayed cerebral involvement in systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma : A second primary tumor or a tardy recurrence? (pages 1843–1849)

      Alexander Lossos, Yaqoub Ashhab, Elena Sverdlin, Gail Amir, Dina Ben-Yehuda and Tali Siegal

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20575

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      Using comparative analysis of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region gene rearrangement, the authors showed that some instances of late-delayed central nervous system involvement in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma may represent a second new lymphoma rather than a true recurrence of the original systemic tumor.

    13. Discipline

      Diagnostic Imaging
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      The age at which women begin mammographic screening (pages 1850–1859)

      James A. Colbert, Emily M. Kaine, JudyAnn Bigby, Darrell N. Smith, Richard H. Moore, Elizabeth Rafferty, Diane Georgian-Smith, Helen Anne D'Alessandro, Eren Yeh, Daniel B. Kopans, Elkan F. Halpern, Kevin Hughes, Barbara L. Smith, Kenneth K. Tanabe and James S. Michaelson

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20583

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      In the current study, most women began screening close to the age of 40 years, as is recommended by the American Cancer Society. Nonetheless, women without private health insurance, women without a primary care physician, and women speaking a primary language other than English were likely to delay the initiation of mammographic screening.

    14. Medical Oncology
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      Multiple-species candidemia in patients with cancer (pages 1860–1865)

      Maha R. Boktour, Dimitrios P. Kontoyiannis, Hend A. Hanna, Ray Y. Hachem, Essam Girgawy, Gerald P. Bodey and Issam I. Raad

      Article first published online: 31 AUG 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20573

      Candidemia is a common cause of bloodstream infections in patients with cancer, with the majority of these infections being caused by a single Candida species. In the current study of patients with cancer who were affected by multiple-species candidemia (MSC), the authors found that MSC was more likely to occur as breakthrough candidemia, particularly in those with leukemia and prolonged neutropenia, and was associated with suboptimal responses to single-agent antifungal therapy.

    15. Pediatric Oncology
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      Role of hydrochloric acid in the treatment of central venous catheter infections in children with cancer (pages 1866–1872)

      Draga Barbaric, Julie Curtin, Lyra Pearson and Peter J. Shaw

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20562

      This article reports the use of intraluminal, 2 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) instillation as an adjunct to systemic antibiotic therapy in pediatric cancer patients with long-term, indwelling, central venous catheters and associated bloodstream infection. The combination of systemic antibiotics and HCl instillation was successful in eradicating infection without need for catheter removal in 67% of episodes in which blood cultures had remained positive despite 48 hours of appropriate antibiotic administration.

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      TrkA expression in peripheral neuroblastic tumors : Prognostic significance and biological relevance (pages 1873–1881)

      Hiroyuki Shimada, Atsuko Nakagawa, Julius Peters, Hong Wang, Peter K. Wakamatsu, John N. Lukens, Katherine K. Matthay, Stuart E. Siegel and Robert C. Seeger

      Article first published online: 31 AUG 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20557

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      Expression levels of trkA, as determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis, were higher in peripheral neuroblastic tumors from patients who were alive and well/alive compared with patients who had progressed or died/died. However, they did not add any significant information to the prognostic grouping defined by the combination of clinical stage, histopathology, and MYCN status. A biologically relevant correlation was found between trkA expression level, MYCN status, and histopathology in tumors of the neuroblastoma category.

    17. Psychological Oncology
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      Physicians don't ask, sometimes patients tell : Disclosure of sexual orientation among women with breast carcinoma (pages 1882–1889)

      Ulrike Boehmer and Patricia Case

      Article first published online: 18 AUG 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20563

      Although the majority of women actively disclosed their sexual orientation to providers, sexual minority patient-provider relationships were apprehensive and providers did not inquire about sexual orientation. Providers should create opportunities for the disclosure of sexual orientation to provide more comprehensive care.

    18. Sympton Control and Palliative Care
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      Chinese version of the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory : Validation and application of symptom measurement in cancer patients (pages 1890–1901)

      Xin Shelley Wang, Ying Wang, Hong Guo, Tito R. Mendoza, Xi-Shan Hao and Charles S. Cleeland

      Article first published online: 31 AUG 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20448

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      Management of disease-related and treatment-related symptoms is an essential component of cancer therapy for patients of every culture and nationality. The authors demonstrated that the Chinese version of the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory is a valid, reliable, and concise tool for measuring symptom severity and interference with functioning in Chinese patients with cancer.

    19. Symptom Control and Palliative Care
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      Use of inferior vena caval filters and survival in patients with malignancy (pages 1902–1907)

      Michael J. Wallace, James L. Jean, Sanjay Gupta, George A. Eapen, Marcella M. Johnson, Kamran Ahrar, David C. Madoff, Frank A. Morello, Ravi Murthy and Marshall E. Hicks

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20578

      Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters were shown to be safe and highly effective in preventing pulmonary emboli-related deaths in patients with cancer who have venous thromboemolic disease. Patients with a history of deep venous thrombosis and bleeding or metastatic/disseminated stage of disease had the lowest survival after IVC filter placement compared with patients with local or locally advanced disease.

    20. Translational Research
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      Development of a chemoresistant orthotopic human nonsmall cell lung carcinoma model in nude mice : Analyses of tumor heterogeneity in relation to the immunohistochemical levels of expression of cyclooxygenase-2, ornithine decarboxylase, lung-related resistance protein, prostaglandin E synthetase, and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-α, GST-μ, and GST-π (pages 1908–1918)

      Anne Mathieu, Myriam Remmelink, Nicky D'Haene, Stanislas Penant, Jean-François Gaussin, Rob Van Ginckel, Francis Darro, Robert Kiss and Isabelle Salmon

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20571

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      Using the A549 cell line, the authors developed an orthotopic model of a human nonsmall-cell lung carcinoma in nude mice. This orthotopic model was resistant to taxol and oxaliplatin and weakly sensitive to irinotecan. It expressed high levels of cyclooxygenase-2, ornithine decarboxylase, prostaglandin E synthetase, lung-related resistance protein (LRP), glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-α, GST-μ, and GST-π in a dramatically heterogeneous manner from one xenograft to another. Taxol and oxaliplatin treatments induced significantly increased expression levels of LRP, GST-μ, and GST-π.

  4. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Erratum
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      Author reply (page 1920)

      Patrice Mathevet

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20577

  5. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Erratum
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