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Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Cancer Cytopathology

25 June 2004

Volume 102, Issue 3

Pages 133–201

Currently known as: Cancer Cytopathology

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Contemporary Issue
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
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      Blinded review of papanicolaou smears (pages 133–135)

      William J. Frable

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20310

      In this issue of Cancer Cytopathology, Renshaw et al. examine blinded review of Papanicolaou smears in the context of litigation and provide a detailed statistical analysis of this process. They also examine the sample size required to validate the blinded review statistically to detect various differences in case difficulty or ease of detection.

      See also pages 136–41, this issue.

  2. Contemporary Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Contemporary Issue
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
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      Blinded review of Papanicolaou smears in the context of litigation : Using statistical analysis to define appropriate thresholds (pages 136–141)

      Andrew A. Renshaw, Mary L. Young and E. Blair Holladay

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20124

      The authors provide data that can be used to interpret the results of a blinded review of cervicovaginal specimens in a statistically appropriate manner. To improve the utility of blinded reviews, the standards are defined explicitly.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Contemporary Issue
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    1. Gynecologic Cytopathology

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      The utility of p16INK4a and Ki-67 staining on cell blocks prepared from residual thin-layer cervicovaginal material (pages 142–149)

      Ilkser Akpolat, Debora A. Smith, Ibrahim Ramzy, Minni Chirala and Dina R. Mody

      Version of Record online: 25 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20258

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      Cell block preparations are useful as additional diagnostic tools in the evaluation of thin-layer cervical samples, and findings made in these preparations are strongly correlated with cytologic and histologic diagnoses. Immunohistochemical staining for p16INK4a and Ki-67 markers also may be helpful in distinguishing neoplastic lesions from less significant lesions, such as atrophy, that may mimic cervical neoplasia.

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      The histologic subtype of ovarian tumors affects the detection rate by pelvic washings (pages 150–156)

      Oluwole Fadare, M. Rajan Mariappan, Sa Wang, Denise Hileeto, Jessica Mcalpine and David L. Rimm

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20239

      Pelvic washings have long been helpful in evaluating ovarian carcinoma. The authors showed that the histologic subtype of the ovarian tumor significantly affects the likelihood of discovery of tumor cells in the pelvic wash.

    3. Fine Needle Aspiration

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      Diagnosis of gastrointestinal tract lesions by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (pages 157–163)

      Martin R. Vander Noot III, Mohamad A. Eloubeidi, Victor K. Chen, Isam Eltoum, Darshana Jhala, Nirag Jhala, Sujath Syed and David C. Chhieng

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20360

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      The authors report their experience with 62 patients who had gastrointestinal tract lesions that were evaluated using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA), which was found to be a safe and accurate diagnostic procedure for such lesions. The potential pitfalls of diagnosing gastrointestinal tract lesions using EUS-FNA also are discussed.

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      ‘Atypical’ and ‘suspicious’ diagnoses in breast aspiration cytology : Is there a need for two categories? (pages 164–167)

      Rima Kanhoush, Merce Jorda, Carmen Gomez-Fernandez, Hong Wang, Marjan Mirzabeigi, Zeina Ghorab and Parvin Ganjei-Azar

      Version of Record online: 25 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20283

      The authors evaluated the histologic correlation of breast fine-needle aspirates that were diagnosed as being ‘atypical’ or ‘suspicious’. The authors suggest the use of a single term, such as ‘equivocal’, to describe aspirates yielding inconclusive findings.

    5. Immunocytochemistry

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      Diagnostic utility of CDX-2 expression in separating metastatic gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma from other metastatic adenocarcinoma in fine-needle aspiration cytology using cell blocks (pages 168–173)

      Reda S. Saad, Deborah L. Essig, Jan F. Silverman and Yulin Liu

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20342

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      CDX-2 was found to be a sensitive and a specific marker to support the intestinal origin of metastatic adenocarcinoma. The authors recommended the addition of CDX-2 to the panel of antibodies for metastatic adenocarcinoma of an unknown primary site, as an indicator of colorectal origin.

    6. Analytical & Quantitative

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      Examination of the proliferative activity of tumor cells in human lymphoid neoplasms using a morphometric approach (pages 174–185)

      Eugene V. Sheval, Janna V. Churakova, Oksana A. Dudnik and Ivan A. Vorobjev

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20341

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      Proliferative indices provide valuable prognostic information for patients with lymphoid neoplasms; however, proliferative index measurements are influenced not only by the proliferative activity of the neoplastic cells in a given lesion, but also by the activity of any admixed reactive cells. In the current report, the authors describe an approach that allows the identification of neoplastic cells and the determination of the proliferative indices of tumor cells using imprints of surgical biopsy specimens.

    7. Analytical and Quantitative Cytopathology

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      Diagnostic classification of urothelial cells in urine cytology specimens using exclusively spectral information (pages 186–191)

      Rajesh Jaganath, Cesar Angeletti, Richard Levenson and David L. Rimm

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20302

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      Diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma in routine cytology specimens is primarily driven by spatial relations or morphology, whereas color analysis plays a very minor role. In the current study, the authors found that spectral information alone is capable of discrimination between benign and malignant urothelial cell clusters, suggesting that it has great potential as a future ancillary test in the detection of bladder carcinoma.

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      Elevated levels of tetraploid cervical cells in human papillomavirus-positive Papanicolaou smears diagnosed as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (pages 192–199)

      Andrew J. Olaharski and David A. Eastmond

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20259

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      A statistically significant proportion of human papillomavirus-positive women with Papanicolaou smears that showed atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance had elevated frequencies of tetraploid cervical cells using multiple-probe fluorescence in situ hybridization.

  4. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Contemporary Issue
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
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    2. You have free access to this content
      Author reply (page 201)

      Annie N. Y. Cheung, Ka-Lai Tsun and Elaine F Szeto

      Version of Record online: 25 MAY 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20241

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