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Cancer

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Supplement: Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training (AANCART): Fifth Asian American Cancer Control Academy

15 December 2005

Volume 104, Issue S12

Pages 2889–3024

  1. Overview/Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Overview/Perspectives
    3. Remarks
    4. AANCART Best Practices
    5. AANCART Pilot Projects
    6. Cancer Control in AAPI
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      Overview of the Fifth Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training Cancer Control Academy : Community partnerships for cancer control: From vision to synergy to reality (pages 2889–2890)

      Kurt P. Snipes

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21520

      This article is an overview of The Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training (AANCART), which has conducted 5 Academies, or annual conferences, since its inception in April of 2000. AANCART is supported through funding from the National Cancer Institute's Special Populations Network.

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      Cancer and social justice : A demographic, economic, historic, sociocultural, and ethical perspective (pages 2891–2894)

      Dileep G. Bal

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21508

      The author, as a first-generation Asian-American immigrant, discussed the dire inequities of the current cancer prevention and control systems, in which the ever-widening gaps in education, social class, and income in the U.S. translate effectively into selectively increased rates of cancer incidence and mortality. Distinct reallocations of extant resources will be needed at the local, state, and national levels of both the public and private sectors if these issues are to be addressed head on, let alone solved.

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      Cancer health disparities among Asian Americans : What we know and what we need to do (pages 2895–2902)

      Moon S. Chen Jr.

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21501

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      The author reviewed the literature and proposed an agenda to reduce cancer health disparities based on the review and the accomplishments and aspirations of the National Cancer Institute-funded Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training.

  2. Remarks

    1. Top of page
    2. Overview/Perspectives
    3. Remarks
    4. AANCART Best Practices
    5. AANCART Pilot Projects
    6. Cancer Control in AAPI
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      Keynote speech: Progress with a purpose (pages 2903–2904)

      Andrew C. von Eschenbach

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21513

      The U.S. invigorated a campaign against cancer when the National Cancer Act of 1971 was signed into law. At that time, the nation pledged as a country to make the conquest of cancer a national cause. Much progress has been made in the more than 30 years since the National Cancer Act, and researchers have much work to do. To achieve the goal of eliminating suffering and death due to cancer, clinicians must define an integrated strategy of multiple interventions along the pathways that are capable of preventing, detecting, eliminating, and controlling cancers.

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      The Asian-American and Pacific Islander population and the American Cancer Society initiative (pages 2905–2908)

      Ralph Vance

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21504

      The American Cancer Society (ACS) Nationwide Asian-American/Pacific Islander (AAPI) Initiative is a continuing collaboration between the ACS and other organizations and community groups. The objectives of the initiative are to provide strategic oversight to the ACS for outreach to AAPI populations and to develop a nationwide plan for the purpose of making ACS programs and services available to these populations.

  3. AANCART Best Practices

    1. Top of page
    2. Overview/Perspectives
    3. Remarks
    4. AANCART Best Practices
    5. AANCART Pilot Projects
    6. Cancer Control in AAPI
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      Houston AANCART best practices : From Vision to Synergy to Reality (pages 2909–2915)

      Beverly J. Gor, Lovell A. Jones, Jessica Hwang, Qingyi Wei and TruongSon Hoang

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21505

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      Researchers and community members share a common vision for addressing cancer and health disparities that exist in the Houston Asian community.

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      AANCART best practices : Cancer awareness activities for Seattle's Cambodian community (pages 2916–2919)

      Paularita Seng, Elizabeth Acorda, J. Carey Jackson, Ann Marchand, Hue Thai, Shin-Ping Tu and Vicky Taylor

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21515

      The Seattle regional Asian American Network for Cancer, Awareness, Research, and Training (AANCART) site has implemented a community-based cancer awareness program for Cambodian immigrants in collaboration with a Cambodian community coalition. Our approach recognizes that limited English language proficiency may preclude many Cambodians from understanding publicly disseminated information, and Cambodian immigrants are often isolated and tend to stay close to their own neighborhoods.

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      Highlights/best practices of San Francisco's Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training (AANCART) (pages 2920–2925)

      Stephen J. McPhee, Tung T. Nguyen, Jeremiah Mock, Thoa Nguyen and Hy Lam

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21506

      The Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training in San Francisco (AANCART-SF) consists of two distinct entities, working in cooperation to advance cancer awareness, research, and training among Asian Americans: a university-based group with expertise in the Vietnamese community and a community-based health plan with expertise in the Chinese community.

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      Stimulating cancer research in Asian communities and training the next generation of scientists : The AANCART-LA experience (pages 2926–2930)

      Roshan Bastani, Annette E. Maxwell, Marjorie Kagawa-Singer, Beth A. Glenn and Koy Parada

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21517

      Summarized are the strategies and successes of the Los Angeles site of the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training (AANCART) project. The Los Angeles site was especially successful in reaching the research and training goals of the overall AANCART project.

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      New York AANCART: Using participatory research to address the health needs of South Asian and Korean Americans in New York City (pages 2931–2936)

      Nadia Islam, Simona C. Kwon, Habibul Ahsan and Ruby T. Senie

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21507

      Using case studies from two community-based partnerships that were developed by New York Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training, the authors describe how the principles of community-based participatory research were applied in two rapidly growing Asian American communities in New York City.

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      Friendships and relationships : Sacramento AANCART's best practice (pages 2937–2939)

      Robin Shimizu, Moon S. Chen Jr., Kurt P. Snipes, Alice Chan, Gary R. Wilson, Jerry L. Chong and Dileep G. Bal

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21510

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      The best practice of Sacramento's Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness Research and Training program is friendships and relationships.

  4. AANCART Pilot Projects

    1. Top of page
    2. Overview/Perspectives
    3. Remarks
    4. AANCART Best Practices
    5. AANCART Pilot Projects
    6. Cancer Control in AAPI
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      Disparities in colorectal cancer screening rates among Asian Americans and non-Latino whites (pages 2940–2947)

      Sabrina T. Wong, Ginny Gildengorin, Tung Nguyen and Jeremiah Mock

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21521

      The 2001 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS 2001) was used to examine screening rates for colorectal cancer (CRC) and factors that were related to CRC screening among different Asian-American ethnic groups compared with the non-Latino whites. These results provide evidence that specific Asian-American populations, especially Koreans and Filipinos, are under-screened for CRC. This is one of the first studies to examine CRC screening among several disaggregated Asian American ethnic groups who were surveyed in different Asian languages.

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      Development of an English as a second language curriculum for hepatitis B virus testing in Chinese Americans (pages 2948–2951)

      Gloria D. Coronado, Vicky Taylor, Elizabeth Acorda, H. Hoai Do and Beti Thompson

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21503

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      Chinese Americans, most of whom are foreign born, are at disproportionately high risk for liver cancer, and a major risk factor for liver cancer in Asia is infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). The authors report on their plans to develop and test a culturally appropriate curriculum that will motivate Chinese students of English as a second language to obtain a blood test for the detection of the HBV.

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      Quality of life in Chinese patients with breast cancerm (pages 2952–2954)

      Angela Sun, Evaon Wong-Kim, Sarah Stearman and Edward A. Chow

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21516

      The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the quality of life among Chinese Americans with breast cancer. Data analysis suggested that there are important differences between American-born and foreign-born Chinese women in their beliefs about, perceptions of, and experiences with breast cancer.

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      Hepatitis B and liver cancer beliefs among Korean immigrants in Western Washington : Report of a qualitative study (pages 2955–2958)

      John H. Choe, Nadine Chan, H. Hoai Do, Erica Woodall, Eunyoung Lim and Victoria M. Taylor

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21518

      Hepatocellular cancer occurs more frequently among Koreans, Vietnamese, and Chinese than other racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. This excess risk can be attributed to high rates of chronic hepatitis B (HBV) infection and low rates of HBV vaccination among Asian immigrants.

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      Assessing the oral cancer risk of South-Asian immigrants in New York City (pages 2959–2961)

      Kavita P. Ahluwalia

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21502

      In this overview of oral cancer risk factors among South-Asian immigrants in the U.S., the author describes a recently funded pilot study that was designed to assess oral cancer risk behaviors in South-Asian seniors. Using data from that study, risk profiles of South-Asian religious and ethnic subgroups may be developed that can be used by medical and dental providers to target early-detection and risk-reduction services in this population.

  5. Cancer Control in AAPI

    1. Top of page
    2. Overview/Perspectives
    3. Remarks
    4. AANCART Best Practices
    5. AANCART Pilot Projects
    6. Cancer Control in AAPI
    1. You have free access to this content
      Seizing the moment : California's opportunity to prevent nutrition-related health disparities in low-income Asian American populations (pages 2962–2968)

      Gail G. Harrison, Marjorie Kagawa-Singer, Susan B. Foerster, Henry Lee, Loan Pham Kim, Tu-Uyen Nguyen, Allyn Fernandez-Ami, Valerie Quinn and Dileep G. Bal

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21514

      Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) have the fastest growing rate of overweight and obese children. Aggressive programs are urgently needed to prevent unhealthy acculturation-related changes in diet and physical activity and to promote the healthier aspects of traditional lifestyle habits.

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      Cancer incidence in the Hmong in California, 1988–2000 (pages 2969–2974)

      Paul K. Mills, Richard C. Yang and Deborah Riordan

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21525

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      Hmong are a recent new immigrant and refugee population in the U.S. Approximately 65,000 Hmong reside in California, and their age-adjusted cancer incidence rates have been calculated for the period 1988–2000. Hmong experienced lower overall cancer incidence rates compared with other Asian groups and non-Hispanic whites but had elevated risks of several forms of cancer, including gastric, hepatic, cervical, and nasopharyngeal cancers. Hmong also had later stage disease at diagnosis for most types of cancer.

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      Asian subgroups and cancer incidence and mortality rates in California (pages 2975–2981)

      Sandy L. Kwong, Moon S. Chen Jr., Kurt P. Snipes, Dileep G. Bal and William E. Wright

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21511

      The cancer burden for Asian Americans often is characterized only by aggregated statistics. However, Asian populations include many groups who differ not only with respect to language and culture but also with respect to immigration patterns. Evaluation of these subgroups using California Cancer Registry data indicated that cancer incidence and mortality rates vary greatly among Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese populations.

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      English language proficiency and smoking prevalence among California's Asian Americans (pages 2982–2988)

      Hao Tang, Robin Shimizu and Moon S. Chen Jr.

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21523

      Smoking prevalence rates among Asian Americans in California differed significantly on the basis of ethnicity, gender, and English proficiency. English proficiency had the effect of reducing smoking prevalence rates among Asian males but had the opposite effect among Asian females. A review of experience in California indicated that both success and challenges lay ahead for tobacco-control efforts in the Asian-American population.

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      1999–2001 Cancer mortality rates for Asian and Pacific Islander ethnic groups with comparisons to their 1988–1992 rates (pages 2989–2998)

      Kenneth C. Chu and Kristine T. Chu

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21509

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      The 1999–2001 site-specific cancer mortality rates are reported for Asian Indians, Chinese, Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Native Hawaiians, Samoans, and Vietnamese males and females. In addition, the 1988–1992 site-specific cancer mortality rates for Chinese, Filipinos, Japanese and Native Hawaiians are reported, standardized to the 2000 U.S. population. Their 1999–2001 and 1988–1992 rates are compared.

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      Clinical trials: Understanding and perceptions of female Chinese-American cancer patients (pages 2999–3005)

      Shin-Ping Tu, Hueifang Chen, Anthony Chen, Jeanette Lim, Suepattra May and Charles Drescher

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21524

      There is a need to increase knowledge of clinical trials among Chinese cancer patients and to examine the effectiveness of current patient-physician communication and interaction. Within the context of Euro-American bioethics, Asian philosophies play major roles in the decision making of Chinese Americans and need further study.

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      Participation of Asian-American women in cancer chemoprevention research : Physician perspectives (pages 3006–3014)

      Tung T. Nguyen, Carol P. Somkin and Yifei Ma

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21519

      The authors evaluated physician perspectives on the participation of Asian-American women in breast cancer chemoprevention research. The findings indicated that few physicians discussed chemoprevention or research participation with their patients. Physicians identified substantial patient barriers to participation, including linguistic issues and knowledge issues. Physicians' own barriers included lack of knowledge and the effort required to participate in research.

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      Asian Americans and cancer clinical trials : A mixed-methods approach to understanding awareness and experience (pages 3015–3024)

      Debora A. Paterniti, Moon S. Chen Jr., Christine Chiechi, Laurel A. Beckett, Nora Horan, Corinne Turrell, Ligaya Smith, Claudia Morain, Lisa Montell, Jose Luis Gonzalez, Sharon Davis and Primo N. Lara Jr.

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2005 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.21522

      The authors undertook a mixed-methods approach to understanding levels of awareness and experiences with cancer clinical trials among Asian Americans. According to a brief survey that was administered to new cancer patients, Asian respondents were less likely than others to have been involved in or to know someone in a trial and reported less willingness than other respondents to consider trial participation. Participant observation indicated that Asian Americans willing to participate in a clinical trial were, on average, younger than most trial participants and presented with advanced disease.

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