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Cancer

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Supplement: Walking Two Worlds—Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology. Proceedings of a Symposium held by the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario

1 October 2006

Volume 107, Issue S7

Pages 1643–1709

  1. Supplement

    1. Top of page
    2. Supplement
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      Preface (pages 1643–1644)

      Ronald Barr, Maru Barrera and Mark Greenberg

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22135

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      Adolescents and young adults with cancer : The scope of the problem and criticality of clinical trials (pages 1645–1655)

      Archie Bleyer, Troy Budd and Michael Montello

      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22102

      Improvements in survival for adolescents and young adults with cancer have lagged behind those in other age groups. Availability of and enrollment in clinical trials are much lower in this age group, and lack of knowledge development contributes to the lack of improvement in outcome.

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      Proceedings of a workshop : Bridging the gap in care and addressing participation in clinical trials (pages 1656–1658)

      Presenters Archie Bleyer, Presenters Sue Morgan and Moderator Ronald Barr

      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22104

      The low participation of adolescents and young adults with cancer in therapeutic clinical trials is a major concern. Strategies to redress this deficiency include cooperation with adult focused study groups and improved communication with parents, families and referring health care providers.

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      Walking two worlds—Adolescent and young adult oncology : Panel discussion between teens and professionals (pages 1659–1662)

      Professional Panel Karen Drybrough, Professional Panel William Frid, Teen Panel Kyra Vitko, Teen Panel Alexander Vlach and Moderator Norma D'Agostino

      Article first published online: 18 AUG 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22110

      Health care professionals and two cancer survivors were asked to discuss the major challenges faced by adolescent cancer patients and their families. The typical tasks of adolescence such as developing a sense of self, achieving autonomy from parents, and establishing successful academic and social lives were identified as particularly difficult for cancer survivors. Health care professionals can assist adolescent cancer patients by providing them with accurate and developmentally appropriate information, helping them restore a sense of normalcy, and by engaging in collaborative problem solving with them.

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      Psychosocial dimensions of cancer in adolescents and young adults (pages 1663–1671)

      Elana E. Evan and Lonnie K. Zeltzer

      Article first published online: 18 AUG 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22107

      Key elements critical to the psychosocial adaptation of the adolescents and young adults with cancer, as well as later effects of the cancer experience, are summarized. Trends in the research literature are reviewed and categorized by family, psychological/emotional and social factors. Treatment implications are summarized under each category, and clinical recommendations, utilizing a case example, are offered to healthcare professionals addressing psychosocial issues in the treatment of adolescents and young adults with cancer.

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      Sexual health and self-esteem in adolescents and young adults with cancer (pages 1672–1679)

      Elana E. Evan, Miriam Kaufman, Andrew B. Cook and Lonnie K. Zeltzer

      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22101

      Self-esteem and sexual health have a significant impact on adolescent identity formation, especially for adolescents and young adults with cancer. Case examples and treatment recommendations derived from a workshop on self-esteem and sexual health in adolescents and young adults with cancer are presented.

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      Support and intervention groups for adolescents with cancer in two Ontario communities (pages 1680–1685)

      Maru Barrera, Sheila Damore-Petingola, Carly Fleming and Judy Mayer

      Article first published online: 18 AUG 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22108

      Adolescents who are treated for cancer must learn to negotiate challenging developmental tasks in the context of their treatment and adverse effects. This may result in psychosocial difficulties. Two intervention programs developed to address the psychosocial needs of adolescents and young adults from different geographic regions in Ontario, central urban and northeastern rural, are described.

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      Choice in fertility preservation in girls and adolescent women with cancer (pages 1686–1689)

      Jeffrey Nisker, Fraņoise Baylis and Carolyn McLeod

      Article first published online: 18 AUG 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22106

      Preservation of fertility in young women embarking on treatment for cancer remains challenging and the outcomes are still uncertain. In this context issues of informed choice assume considerable importance.

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      Female gamete preservation (pages 1690–1694)

      Victoria J. Davis

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22105

      Chemotherapy and irradiation are predictably gonadotoxic but strategies for ovarian protection are of uncertain efficacy. Assisted reproductive technology provides hope for future patients.

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      Health-risk behaviors and health promotion in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors (pages 1695–1701)

      Melissa M. Hudson and Sheri Findlay

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22103

      Health professionals caring for adolescent and young adults have an opportunity to influence behavioral practices by correcting knowledge deficits, addressing factors that enhance the survivor's sense of vulnerability to health problems, and providing personalized health counseling that promotes the practice of health-promoting behaviors.

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      In sickness and in health : Transition of cancer-related care for older adolescents and young adults (pages 1702–1709)

      David R. Freyer and Rhonda Kibrick-Lazear

      Article first published online: 18 AUG 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22109

      Transition of oncology-related care between the pediatric and adult settings may be either ‘health-oriented’ (amenable to advance planning and usually involving relatively healthy young adult survivors of childhood cancer needing continued, life-long monitoring by adult-oriented providers) or ‘crisis-oriented’ (occurring urgently in association with the unexpected diagnosis of a relapsed, secondary or primary malignancy in a young adult). Capability in carrying out both types of transitions should be a central goal of pediatric and adolescent oncology programs.

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