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Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Cancer Cytopathology

25 December 2006

Volume 108, Issue 6

Pages 447–506

Currently known as: Cancer Cytopathology

  1. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Original Articles
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      The American society of cytopathology's future : Cutting edge or damage control? (pages 447–450)

      Dorothy L. Rosenthal

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22175

      This article is a transcript of the Papanicolaou Award Address presented on Sunday, November 6, 2005 at the American Society of Cytopathology Annual Scientific Meeting.

  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Original Articles
    1. Gynecologic Cytopathology

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      A comparison of the clinical utility of p16INK4a immunolocalization with the presence of human papillomavirus by hybrid capture 2 for the detection of cervical dysplasia/neoplasia (pages 451–461)

      E. Blair Holladay, Sarah Logan, Jeffrey Arnold, Brad Knesel and G. Denice Smith

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22284

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      The presence or absence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and the expression of p16INK4a protein were examined in 400 cervical ThinPrep® specimens. Although both methods aided in the management of patients with clinically significant lesions, HPV status offered greater sensitivity, and p16INK4a offered greater specificity for detecting cervical dysplasia and neoplasia.

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      “Sip volume” as a quality indicator in liquid-based cervical cytology (pages 462–467)

      Mark E. Sherman, Jessica Kahler, Karen S. Gustafson and Sophia S. Wang

      Version of Record online: 9 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22283

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      Cervical ThinPreps requiring very low volumes for preparation (“sip volumes”) tend to be hypocellular, and ThinPreps requiring very low or high sip volumes are associated with uneven cell deposition. Although results of cytology and HPV tests as performed were generally unrelated to sip volume, results using other protocols or assays may vary.

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      Human papillomavirus testing using hybrid capture II with surepath collection : Initial evaluation and longitudinal data provide clinical validation for this method (pages 468–474)

      Vincent Ko, Rosemary H. Tambouret, Diane L. Kuebler, W. Stephen Black-Schaffer and David C. Wilbur

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22285

      Clinical validation of non-FDA–approved HPV tests is critical for patient care because management guidelines employing results of HPV tests are based on studies using FDA-validated methods. Specimens using Hybrid Capture II with SurePath collection were studied over a 17-month period. In HPV-positive/negative cases of ASC-US, follow-up showed CIN III+ in 7.8%/1.4%, and CIN II+ in 17.5%/4.3%, respectively, indicating similar results when compared with FDA-approved assays for HPV detection.

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      Alternating high-risk human papillomavirus infection : Consequences of Progression to Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (pages 475–479)

      Dorien C. Rijkaart, Tj. Romke Bontekoe, Hans Korporaal and Mathilde E. Boon

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22305

      In the current study, the authors investigated the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the likelihood of progression to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in a total of 703 women. They found that none of the 504 women with 2 negative HPV tests developed CIN.

    5. Non-Gynecologic Cytopathology

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      An online quiz uncovers limitations of morphology in equivocal lung cytology (pages 480–487)

      Katharina Glatz, Spasenija Savic, Dieter Glatz, Gilbert Francz, Audrey Barascud, Bruno Grilli, Michelle Herzog, Peter Dalquen, Georg Feichter, Peter Spieler, Michael Tamm and Lukas Bubendorf

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22286

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      An online image gallery of cytological lung specimens was set up after the diagnostic categories of the shown cell groups had been ascertained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Cytological evaluation by 137 cytomorphologists revealed limitations of cytomorphology in a subset of equivocal lung cytology, suggesting that FISH for chromosomal analysis may be a useful diagnostic tool in this difficult field.

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      Cytopathologic factors can predict invasion in small-sized peripheral lung adenocarcinoma with a bronchioloalveolar carcinoma component (pages 488–493)

      Naoki Maezawa, Koji Tsuta, Yasuo Shibuki, Shigeki Yamazaki, Akiko M. Maeshima, Shun-ichi Watanabe and Yoshihiro Matsuno

      Version of Record online: 9 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22287

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      Nuclear overlapping in more than three layers, and more than 3-fold variation in nuclear size in tumor cells were significantly associated with invasion in small-sized peripheral lung adenocarcinoma with bronchioloalvelolar carcinoma component.

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      Detection of cervical high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions from cytologic samples using a novel immunocytochemical assay (ProEx™ C) (pages 494–500)

      Deidra Kelly, Erik Kincaid, Zoya Fansler, Dorothy L. Rosenthal and Douglas P. Clark

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22288

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      Routine liquid-based cytology (LBC) provides excellent sensitivity for the detection of cervical high-grade squamous epithelial lesion (HSIL); however, its specificity is low. In the current study, the authors determined that the ProEx™ C immunocytochemical assay may increase the positive predictive value of LBC for biopsy-proven HSIL.

    8. Fine-Needle Aspiration

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      Fine-needle aspiration cytology of pancreatic lymphoepithelial cysts (pages 501–506)

      Maria Luisa Policarpio-Nicolas, Vanessa M. Shami, Michel Kahaleh, Reid B. Adams, Shawn Mallery, Michael W. Stanley, Ricardo H. Bardales and Edward B. Stelow

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22289

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      Pancreatic lymphoepithelial cysts (LECs) are extremely rare, and certain cytologic pitfalls may hinder a correct prospective diagnosis. The authors analyzed the clinical, radiologic, and cytologic features of 4 patients who underwent sampling of lymphoepithelial cysts (LECs) of the pancreas by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration and compared those features with the features from patients reported in the literature. The differential diagnosis and methods for distinguishing the various pancreatic cystic lesions are discussed.

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