You have free access to this content

Cancer

Cover image for Cancer

Supplement: Environmental Factors in Breast Cancer

15 June 2007

Volume 109, Issue S12

Pages 2627–2751

  1. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Supplement
    4. Commentary
    1. You have free access to this content
      Environmental pollutants, diet, physical activity, body size, and breast cancer : Where do we stand in research to identify opportunities for prevention? (pages 2627–2634)

      Julia Green Brody, Ruthann A. Rudel, Karin B. Michels, Kirsten B. Moysich, Leslie Bernstein, Kathleen R. Attfield and Sharon Gray

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22656

      A critical assessment of epidemiologic research on breast cancer and environmental pollutants, diet, physical activity, and body size is provided and toxicologic research on animal mammary gland carcinogens reveals opportunities for risk reduction and future research needs. The risk of breast cancer for women in mid-life makes prevention-oriented research a public health priority.

  2. Supplement

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Supplement
    4. Commentary
    1. You have free access to this content
      Chemicals causing mammary gland tumors in animals signal new directions for epidemiology, chemicals testing, and risk assessment for breast cancer prevention (pages 2635–2666)

      Ruthann A. Rudel, Kathleen R. Attfield, Jessica N. Schifano and Julia Green Brody

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22653

      Chemicals that increase mammary gland tumors in animals may also be breast carcinogens in humans. The current study reports on 216 mammary gland carcinogens that include industrial chemicals, chlorinated solvents, products of combustion, pesticides, dyes, radiation, drinking water disinfection byproducts, pharmaceuticals and hormones, natural products, and research chemicals.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Environmental pollutants and breast cancer : Epidemiologic studies (pages 2667–2711)

      Julia Green Brody, Kirsten B. Moysich, Olivier Humblet, Kathleen R. Attfield, Gregory P. Beehler and Ruthann A. Rudel

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22655

      Targets for breast cancer research include numerous environmental pollutants that cause mammary gland tumors, disrupt hormones, or affect mammary gland development and susceptibility in laboratory studies. Although to the authors' knowledge most have never been included in human breast cancer research, critical reviews of epidemiologic studies have shown some evidence of an association with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and, to a lesser extent, organic solvents.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Diet and breast cancer : A review of the prospective observational studies (pages 2712–2749)

      Karin B. Michels, Anshu P. Mohllajee, Edith Roset-Bahmanyar, Gregory P. Beehler and Kirsten B. Moysich

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22654

      Prospective studies are reviewed and summarized on selected dietary factors, gene-diet interactions, and breast cancer incidence. Among the prospective epidemiologic studies conducted on diet and breast cancer incidence and gene-diet interactions and breast cancer incidence, to date there is no association that is consistent, strong, and statistically significant, except for alcohol consumption, overweight, and weight gain.

  3. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Supplement
    4. Commentary
    1. You have free access to this content

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION