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Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Cancer Cytopathology

25 February 2007

Volume 111, Issue 1

Pages 1–66

Currently known as: Cancer Cytopathology

  1. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Original Article
    5. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Human papillomavirus testing and molecular markers of cervical dysplasia and carcinoma (pages 1–14)

      Donna Dehn, Kathleen C. Torkko and Kenneth R. Shroyer

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22425

      Approximately 3 million women annually receive an equivocal cervical cytology test that requires further evaluation and invasive procedures. HPV testing and surrogate molecular markers of HPV infection could provide a critical diagnostic adjunct to the cervical cytology test for the detection of high-grade dysplasia or cervical cancer in these cases.

  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Original Article
    5. Original Articles
    1. Gynecologic Cytopathology

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      The Bethesda interobserver reproducibility study (BIRST) : A web-based assessment of the Bethesda 2001 system for classifying cervical cytology (pages 15–25)

      Mark E. Sherman, Abhijit Dasgupta, Mark Schiffman, Ritu Nayar and Diane Solomon

      Version of Record online: 21 DEC 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22423

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      The Bethesda Interobserver Reproducibility Study, a web-based investigation of cervical cytology performance, demonstrated that among participants with more than 1 year of experience, cytomorphology is a more important determinant of interobserver agreement than participants' academic/professional degrees.

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      Routine endometrial sampling of asymptomatic premenopausal women shedding normal endometrial cells in papanicolaou tests is not cost effective (pages 26–33)

      Malathy Kapali, Narasimhan P. Agaram, David Dabbs, Anisa Kanbour, Susan White and R. Marshall Austin

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22424

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      Following the implementation of 2001 Bethesda guidelines for reporting normal endometrial cells in women ages ≥40 years, endometrial sampling has increased, but detection of significant endometrial pathology has not increased. In this study, the authors performed an analysis to determine whether routine endometrial sampling in this group of women is cost effective in detecting significant endometrial pathology. On the basis of findings, it appears that routine endometrial sampling in asymptomatic premenopausal women is not cost effective.

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      Impact of HPV testing, HPV vaccine development, and changing screening frequency on national Pap test volume : Projections from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) (pages 34–40)

      Isam A. Eltoum and Janie Roberson

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22487

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      The authors used data from NHIS 2000 and NHIS 2005 to estimate the total number of Pap tests currently performed in the United States and to project the change in volume over the next 25 years. The total number of Pap tests is approximately 65 million (95% CI, 64-67) and is expected to significantly decrease despite changing demographics.

    4. Fine-Needle Aspiration

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      Cytology of desmoplastic small round-cell tumor : Comparison of pre- and post-chemotherapy fine-needle aspiration biopsies (pages 41–46)

      Alison E. Presley, Christina S. Kong, David M. Rowe and Kristen A. Atkins

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22421

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      This study assesses how chemotherapy alters cytologic features of desmoplastic small round-cell tumor (DSRCT) and summarizes the variability of cytologic features that may preclude diagnosisof DSRCT by cytologic means alone. Because of extensive cytomorphologic variability and overlapping features with other small round-cell tumors, immunocytochemistry and cytogenetics are typically necessary for definitive diagnosis. Chemotherapy further alters the cytomorphologic variability of DSRCT.

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      Cystic pancreatic endocrine tumor : A variant commonly confused with cystic adenocarcinoma (pages 47–53)

      Vikram Deshpande and Gregory Y. Lauwers

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22422

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      Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of cystic pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) frequently causes diagnostic difficulties, partly because of unexpected overlapping features with cystic ductal adenocarcinomas. Awareness of cystic PETs and their deceptive cytologic features would assist in distinguishing these lesions from cystic ductal adenocarcinomas.

  3. Original Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Original Article
    5. Original Articles
    1. Immunocytochemistry

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      Use of p63 for distinction of glandular versus squamous lesions in cervicovaginal specimens (pages 54–57)

      Monica T. Garcia, B. Cenk Acar, Merce Jorda, Carmen Gomez-Fernandez and Parvin Ganjei-Azar

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22419

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      p63 is a useful immunocytochemical marker for differentiating primary glandular pathology from HSIL in cervicovaginal specimens. It also detects isolated HSIL cells (“litigation cells”). This antibody is not expressed in AGUS, adenocarcinoma, or in glandular cells. p63 stains basal cells and may be a diagnostic pitfall in atrophic cervicovaginal specimens.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Articles
    3. Original Articles
    4. Original Article
    5. Original Articles
    1. Immunocytochemistry

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      Triage of women with ASCUS and LSIL cytology : Use of qualitative assessment of p16INK4a positive cells to identify patients with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (pages 58–66)

      Nicolas Wentzensen, Christine Bergeron, Frederic Cas, Svetlana Vinokurova and Magnus von Knebel Doeberitz

      Version of Record online: 21 DEC 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22420

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      The authors investigated the efficacy of p16INK4a as a biomarker to identify samples of patients with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia among those with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion result in Papanicolaou cytology.

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