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Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Cancer Cytopathology

25 June 2007

Volume 111, Issue 3

Pages 137–202

Currently known as: Cancer Cytopathology

  1. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Editorial
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
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      Relationship between the cytologic reporting rate for high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse and Papanicolaou smear sensitivity : A simple mathematic proof with practical implications (pages 137–140)

      Huw Llewellyn

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22772

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      The reporting rate for high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse is used as a performance measure by the College of American Pathologists to assess the performance of laboratories reporting Papanicolaou smears. It has been recognized that the reporting rate is dependent on the ability of laboratories to identify smears as abnormal and on the underlying prevalence of the abnormalities in the population being screened. The importance of these 2 components is widely recognized but to the author's knowledge their relationship with the reporting rate has never been formally stated in the literature. This relationship can be described in simple mathematic terms using the algebraic descriptions of reporting rate and test sensitivity.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Editorial
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
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      Complaining about quality assurance in gynecologic cytology : A window that is now closing (pages 141–142)

      Andrew Renshaw

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22771

      In this issue of Cancer Cytopathology, Dr. Llewellyn demonstrates that reporting rates of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and worse are dependent on both the sensitivity of the test and the prevalence of the disease in the population being tested. Although it is simple, straightforward, and direct, Dr. Renshaw believes that, at its core, the article is not so much a proof than a restatement of the definition of sensitivity and why this is different than the apparent rate of disease reported by a test.

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      Screening for cervical cancer—controversy and contention or thoughtful analysis (pages 143–144)

      William J. Frable

      Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22752

      With human papillomavirus vaccination, it may be possible to largely eliminate a globally prevalent cancer. Excitement and expectations over this possibility are high, but there are understandably significant concerns on how widespread vaccination for cervical cancer prevention will affect cytology screening programs and the professions of cytotechnology and cytopathology.

  3. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Editorial
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
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      Integration of human papillomavirus vaccination, cytology, and human papillomavirus testing (pages 145–153)

      Mark Schiffman

      Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22751

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      By removing the most evident and threatening cytologic, colposcopic, and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing results from cervical cancer prevention programs, successful HPV type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18 prophylactic vaccination will leave behind more equivocal and less predictive abnormalities. This is good news for women; however, if we vaccinate widely, we will need to adjust the rest of the cervical cancer prevention program.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Editorial
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    1. Gynecologic Cytopathology

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      Significance and possible causes of false-negative results of reflex human papillomavirus infection testing (pages 154–159)

      Isam A. Eltoum, David C. Chhieng, D. Ralph Crowe, Janie Roberson, Ge Jin and Thomas R. Broker

      Version of Record online: 3 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22688

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      The authors assessed the rate and possible reasons for false-negative reflex human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA tests under routine laboratory use. The false-negative fraction for the HPV test was 14%. Lesions that were missed during HPV testing tended to be smaller and shed fewer cells than lesions that were detected by testing, probably representing early or regressing lesions.

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      Cytologic diagnosis of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women : Lessons learned from human papillomavirus DNA testing (pages 160–165)

      Elizabeth I. Johnston and Sanjay Logani

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22687

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      In cervical cytology specimens from perimenopausal and postmenopausal women, the diagnosis of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, as defined according to the Bethesda system, often is not associated with a clinically evident lesion on follow-up. Reflex human papillomavirus testing provides an opportunity to distinguish cytologic features of significance from those within the spectrum of benign cellular change in this age group.

    3. Fine-Needle Aspiration

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      Deep fibromatosis (desmoid tumor) : Cytopathologic characteristics, clinicoradiologic features, and immunohistochemical findings on fine-needle aspiration (pages 166–172)

      Christopher L. Owens, Rajni Sharma and Syed Z. Ali

      Version of Record online: 3 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22689

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      Cytopathologic features of deep fibromatosis have not been well characterized. Cytomorphology coupled with clinical data and immunohistochemical findings may allow a specific diagnosis, which can be useful in settings in which open biopsy is not feasible.

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      The needle in the haystack: Application of breast fine-needle aspirate samples to quantitative protein microarray technology (pages 173–184)

      Amy Rapkiewicz, Virginia Espina, Jo Anne Zujewski, Peter F. Lebowitz, Armando Filie, Julia Wulfkuhle, Kevin Camphausen, Emanuel F. Petricoin III, Lance A. Liotta and Andrea Abati

      Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22686

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      Breast fine-needle aspirate samples are of sufficient quantity and quality for quantitative analysis of phosphoproteins through reverse-phase protein microarrays. The capacity to monitor the in vivo state of cell-signaling proteins before and after treatment has the potential to augment the ability to design individualized therapy regimens through the mapping of aberrant cell-signaling phenotypes.

    5. Molecular Diagnostics

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      Fluorescence in situ hybridization of ductal lavage samples identifies malignant phenotypes from cytologically normal cells in women with breast cancer (pages 185–191)

      Kelly M. Adduci, Caroline E. Annis, Sandy DeVries, Karen L. Chew, Jennifer Boutin, Gregg Magrane, Britt-Marie Ljung, Frederic M. Waldman and Laura J. Esserman

      Version of Record online: 1 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22690

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      Ductal lavage sampling of breast neoplasia was characterized by cytology and molecular analyses. Fluorescence in situ hybridization copy number alterations were present even in the absence of cytologic abnormalities.

    6. Molecular Diagnosis

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      Cytologic diagnosis of Ewing sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor with paired prospective molecular genetic analysis (pages 192–199)

      Souzan Sanati, Danielle W. Lu, Edith Schmidt, Arie Perry, Louis P. Dehner and John D. Pfeifer

      Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22692

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      The results from this study indicated that fine-needle aspiration (FNA) needle rinse or cell block preparations provided sufficient material for molecular genetic testing by either fluorescence in situ hybridization or reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction without compromising conventional cytologic and immunocytochemical analyses. The findings showed that molecular testing can provide clinically useful ancillary information when a tumor's cytologic features and/or immunophenotype are equivocal, although testing is subject to many of the same limitations that impact the utility of molecular analysis when applied to conventional biopsy specimens.

  5. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Editorial
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
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      Author reply (pages 201–202)

      Andre Goy, John Stewart, Ruth Katz, Nour Sneige and Frederic Gilles

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22694

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