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Cancer

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Supplement: Cancer Survivorship: Embracing the Future

1 June 2008

Volume 112, Issue S11

Pages 2523–2626

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      Cancer survivorship: Embracing the future North Bethesda, MD

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23599

  1. Supplement

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    2. Supplement
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      Introduction: Partnering to embrace the future of cancer survivorship research and care (pages 2523–2528)

      Julia H. Rowland and Michael Stefanek

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23451

      The growing population of individuals living long term following a cancer diagnosis has led to a rapid acceleration in the pace of survivorship research. Much is already known about some of the more persistent and late occurring effects of cancer and its treatment, but much still needs to be learned, in particular, how best to improve quality of life along with expanded length of survival. To ensure that survivors and their loved ones receive state-of-the-art care based on a solid research evidence base will require collaborative partnerships, such as that created between the American Cancer Society, National Cancer Institute, and Lance Armstrong Foundation in hosting our biennial conference.

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      Information support for cancer survivors (pages 2529–2540)

      Bradford W. Hesse, Neeraj K. Arora, Ellen Burke Beckjord and Lila J. Finney Rutten

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23445

      Data from the 2005 administration of the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) were used to describe the information-seeking behavior and needs of cancer survivors as sampled from the general population. The results highlight an ongoing and continuous need to search for cancer-related information, a need that is met initially by healthcare providers during the first year after diagnosis but that is supplanted by access to the Internet after transitioning from patient to survivor.

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      Intimacy and relationship processes in couples' psychosocial adaptation to cancer (pages 2541–2555)

      Sharon Manne and Hoda Badr

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23450

      On the basis of existing conceptualizations, empiric research, and their perspective on the literature, the authors formulated the relationship intimacy model as a first step toward building a framework for researchers and clinicians who are interested in examining couples' psychosocial adaptation to cancer.

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      Quality of life of family caregivers of cancer survivors : Across the trajectory of the illness (pages 2556–2568)

      Youngmee Kim and Barbara A. Given

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23449

      This review of literature on the quality of life of family caregivers at the acute and middle- to long-term survivorship phases and the bereavement phase provided solid evidence about the psychological impact of cancer on family caregivers. Theoretically and methodologically rigorous research on various aspects of the family's quality of life, including physical, spiritual, and behavioral adjustment to cancer in the family, is suggested as a direction for future research.

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      A gerontologic perspective on cancer and aging (pages 2569–2576)

      Thomas O. Blank and Keith M. Bellizzi

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23444

      Methods and concepts of gerontology focus on typical physical, psychologic, and social aging. Incorporating these aspects into oncology can help explicate empiric findings that older cancer survivors are generally less affected psychologically, negatively and positively, than younger ones.

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      Physical and psychological long-term and late effects of cancer (pages 2577–2592)

      Kevin D. Stein, Karen L. Syrjala and Michael A. Andrykowski

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23448

      The current article reviews current knowledge regarding the physical and psychological long-term and late effects among adult survivors of pediatric and adult cancers. The focus is on the prevalence and correlates of these problems as well as the associated deficits in physical and emotional functioning. Emerging public health initiatives and large-scale research projects designed to document the long-term impact of cancer are also discussed.

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      Recruiting and retaining breast cancer survivors into a randomized controlled exercise trial : The Yale Exercise and Survivorship Study (pages 2593–2606)

      Melinda L. Irwin, Lisa Cadmus, Marty Alvarez-Reeves, Mary O'Neil, Eileen Mierzejewski, Rebecca Latka, Herbert Yu, Loretta DiPietro, Beth Jones, M. Tish Knobf, Gina G. Chung and Susan T. Mayne

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23446

      The Yale Exercise and Survivorship Study compared various recruitment strategies on accrual rates and baseline characteristics of breast cancer survivors and reported adherence to recommended levels of physical activity. Findings from this study will provide useful information for investigators conducting exercise trials in cancer populations, clinicians treating women diagnosed with breast cancer, and exercise professionals developing community-based exercise programs for cancer survivors.

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      Potential role of mind-body therapies in cancer survivorship (pages 2607–2616)

      Daniel A. Monti, Meryl Sufian and Caroline Peterson

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23443

      Oncologists, primary care physicians, and other practitioners can potentially use mind-body therapies to connect certain cancer survivor populations to psychosocial interventions and facilitate discussions on complementary and alternative medicine.

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      Survivorship research based in integrated healthcare delivery systems : The Cancer Research Network (pages 2617–2626)

      Ann M. Geiger, Diana S. M. Buist, Sarah M. Greene, Andrea Altschuler and Terry S. Field

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23447

      The Cancer Research Network (CRN) includes 14 integrated healthcare delivery systems that provide healthcare to a large and diverse population, possess extensive electronic claims data, and incorporate scientists conducting research in the public domain. Survivorship research is a major focus of the CRN and has benefited from the capability of the CRN to use multiple approaches to gather data on patients, providers, and organizations.

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