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Cancer

Cover image for Cancer

1 August 2008

Volume 113, Issue 3

Pages 447–663

  1. Cancer Scope

    1. Top of page
    2. Cancer Scope
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Erratum
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      Cancer scope (pages 447–449)

      Carrie Printz

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23792

  2. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cancer Scope
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Erratum
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      Predicting disease progression after nephrectomy for localized renal cell carcinoma: The utility of prognostic models and molecular biomarkers (pages 450–460)

      Paul L. Crispen, Stephen A. Boorjian, Christine M. Lohse, Bradley C. Leibovich and Eugene D. Kwon

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23566

      Disease progression after nephrectomy for localized renal cell carcinoma is associated with poor survival. The accuracy of current prediction models may be improved through the incorporation of molecular biomarkers and serve to enhance the inclusion criteria of adjuvant trials.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cancer Scope
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Erratum
    1. Disease Site

      Gastrointestinal Disease
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      The impact of ethnicity on the presentation and prognosis of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma : Results from the National Cancer Data Base (pages 461–469)

      Waddah B. Al-Refaie, Jennifer F. Tseng, Greer Gay, Lina Patel-Parekh, Paul F. Mansfield, Peter W. T. Pisters, James C. Yao and Barry W. Feig

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23572

      To validate the observation that ethnicity is associated with presentation and outcome of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma, the authors used a large U.S. hospital-based database, the National Cancer Data Base. The findings indicated that ethnicity has a significant impact on presentation, treatment, and prognosis in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma.

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      Correlation of histology with biomarker status after photodynamic therapy in Barrett esophagus (pages 470–476)

      Ganapathy A. Prasad, Kenneth K. Wang, Kevin C. Halling, Navtej S. Buttar, Louis-Michel Wongkeesong, Alan R. Zinsmeister, Shannon M. Brankley, Wytske M. Westra, Lori S. Lutzke, Lynn S. Borkenhagen and Kelly Dunagan

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23573

      Histologic downgrading of dysplasia after photodynamic therapy has been associated with the loss of biomarkers which, in turn, have been associated with the progression of neoplasia in Barrett esophagus. In this study, patients with persistently positive biomarkers appeared to be at a higher risk of recurrent high-grade dysplasia.

    3. Genitourinary Disease
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      Percentage of high-grade carcinoma as a prognostic indicator in patients with renal cell carcinoma (pages 477–483)

      Maria F. Serrano, Matthew Katz, Yan Yan, Adam S. Kibel and Peter A. Humphrey

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23574

      Determination of the percentage of primary renal cell carcinoma that is 0%, 1% to 50%, or 51% to 100% high Fuhrman grade 3 or 4 is a simple and powerful measurement of patient outcome after surgery that provides additional prognostic information beyond stage, primary tumor size, and conventional Fuhrman grade. This prognostic information could be useful in the stratification of patients into prognostic groups for the development of more individualized follow-up schedules and for enrollment into clinical trials.

    4. Gynecologic Disease
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      Combining a symptoms index with CA 125 to improve detection of ovarian cancer (pages 484–489)

      M. Robyn Andersen, Barbara A. Goff, Kimberly A. Lowe, Nathalie Scholler, Lindsay Bergan, Charles W. Dresher, Pamela Paley and Nicole Urban

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23577

      The current study sought to determine whether an index based on symptoms commonly reported by women with ovarian cancer could be used in combination with CA 125 and transvaginal sonography (TVS) to screen women for ovarian cancer. The addition of a symptom index to CA 125 created a composite index that identified >80% of women with early-stage disease. A composite marker such as this could be of value as a first step in a multistep screening program in which false-positive results are identified via TVS before referral for surgery.

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      Phase 2 study of intraperitoneal topotecan as consolidation chemotherapy in ovarian and primary peritoneal carcinoma (pages 490–496)

      Howard G. Muntz, Thomas W. Malpass, Kathryn F. McGonigle, Mandy D. Robertson and Paul L. Weiden

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23576

      Consolidation intraperitoneal topotecan therapy was tolerable in women with advanced ovarian and primary peritoneal cancers in this phase 2 pilot study.

    6. Head and Neck Disease
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      Intensity-modulated chemoradiation for treatment of stage III and IV oropharyngeal carcinoma : The University of California–San Francisco experience (pages 497–507)

      Kim Huang, Ping Xia, Cynthia Chuang, Vivian Weinberg, Christine M. Glastonbury, David W. Eisele, Nancy Y. Lee, Sue S. Yom, Theodore L. Phillips and Jeanne M. Quivey

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23578

      Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy without prior surgical resection resulted in excellent local and regional control in 71 patients with stage III and IV oropharyngeal carcinoma. There was significant sparing of the parotid glands and other critical normal tissues, with moderate acute toxicities and minimal severe late effects.

    7. Hematologic Malignancies
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      Low-dose, single-agent temsirolimus for relapsed mantle cell lymphoma : A phase 2 trial in the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (pages 508–514)

      Stephen M. Ansell, David J. Inwards, Kendrith M. Rowland Jr., Patrick J. Flynn, Roscoe F. Morton, Dennis F. Moore Jr., Scott H. Kaufmann, Irene Ghobrial, Paul J. Kurtin, Matthew Maurer, Christine Allmer and Thomas E. Witzig

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23580

      In this trial by the North Central Cancer Treatment Group, a low dose (25 mg weekly) of the mammalian target of rapamycin kinase inhibitor temsirolimus was tested in patients with relapsed mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). The dose level retained the antitumor activity of the 250-mg dose with less myelosuppression. The current results indicate that further studies of temsirolimus in combination with other active drugs for MCL and other lymphoid malignancies are warranted.

    8. Pediatric Oncology
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      Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Down syndrome : Presenting features and treatment outcome in the experience of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP) (pages 515–521)

      Maurizio Arico, Ottavio Ziino, Maria Grazia Valsecchi, Giovanni Cazzaniga, Carlo Baronci, Chiara Messina, Andrea Pession, Nicola Santoro, Giuseppe Basso and Valentino Conter

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23587

      The presenting features and treatment outcome of 120 patients with Down syndrome (DS) and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were compared with 6237 non-DS patients treated in the same years. Presenting features of childhood ALL in DS differ from those in non-DS patients. They are almost invariably characterized by BCP phenotype, and are often TEL/AML1 negative. Treatment results, although not as good as for non-DS patients, improved progressively, with modern therapy and support allowing 75% to survive.

    9. Hematologic Malignancies
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      Clinical and biologic features and treatment outcome of children with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia and hyperleukocytosis (pages 522–529)

      Hiroto Inaba, Ying Fan, Stanley Pounds, Terrence L. Geiger, Jeffrey E. Rubnitz, Raul C. Ribeiro, Ching-Hon Pui and Bassem I. Razzouk

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23581

      Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with hyperleukocytosis often is associated with early complications because of leukostasis, which was more prevalent in patients with AML M4 and M5 French-American-British subtypes and higher initial leukocyte counts in the current study. Although early mortality in such patients has remarkably decreased in the more recent period of study, with improvement of management including supportive care, they still had a lower postremission event-free survival rate.

    10. Lung Disease
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      Up-regulation of CD40 with juxtacrine activity in human nonsmall lung cancer cells correlates with poor prognosis (pages 530–541)

      Keidai Ishikawa, Masaki Miyamoto, Tatsuya Yoshioka, Tatsuya Kato, Mitsuhito Kaji, Toshiro Ohbuchi, Satoshi Hirano, Tomoo Itoh, Hirotoshi Dosaka-Akita and Satoshi Kondo

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23618

      CD40 expression in lung cancer cells is associated with a poor prognosis in immunohistochemical analysis. A juxtacrine interaction of CD40–CD154 among cancer cells facilitates the development of malignant potential in nonsmall cell lung cancer.

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      Comparison of outcomes for elderly patients treated with weekly paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin versus the standard 3-weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin for advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (pages 542–546)

      Suresh Ramalingam, Michael C. Perry, Renato V. La Rocca, David Rinaldi, Preston S. Gable, William J. Tester and Chandra P. Belani

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23583

      Efficacy was similar between a weekly regimen and a standard regimen of carboplatin and paclitaxel for elderly patients with advanced NSCLC. Elderly patients on the weekly regimen exhibited better tolerance than those on the standard regimen. Thus, the weekly regimen offers an advantageous tolerability profile to this patient population.

    12. Epidemiology
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      Bronchogenic carcinoma and secondary aspergillosis—Common yet unexplored : Evaluation of the role of bronchoalveolar lavage-polymerase chain reaction and some nonvalidated serologic methods to establish early diagnosis (pages 547–558)

      Mohammed Shahid, Abida Malik and Rakesh Bhargava

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23570

      There appears to be a frequent association between bronchogenic carcinoma and secondary aspergillosis, and invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is a common clinical problem in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer. In this study, the authors investigated bronchoalveolar lavage polymerase chain reaction, and the results indicated that it seems promising for making an early diagnosis, especially in patients with possible invasive and noninvasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    13. Neuro-Oncology
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      External beam irradiation and the combination of cisplatin and carmustine followed by carmustine alone for the treatment of high-grade glioma : A phase 2 Southwest Oncology Group trial (pages 559–565)

      Deborah T. Blumenthal, Cathryn Rankin, Harmon J. Eyre, Robert B. Livingston, Alexander M. Spence, Keith J. Stelzer, Elisabeth J. Rushing, Mitchel S. Berger, Saul E. Rivkin, Allen L. Cohn and Stephen H. Petersdorf

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23585

      The Southwest Oncology Group evaluated carmustine and cisplatin in combination with external beam radiotherapy for the treatment of patients with high‒grade gliomas. Despite the presence of a cohort of long‒term survivors, the current study results do not suggest an improvement over treatment with radiotherapy and carmustine alone.

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      Young age may predict a better outcome for children with diffuse pontine glioma (pages 566–572)

      Alberto Broniscer, Fred H. Laningham, Robert P. Sanders, Larry E. Kun, David W. Ellison and Amar Gajjar

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23584

      Although the survival of children with diffuse pontine glioma remains abysmal, a few prognostic factors have been associated with an improved outcome in the minority of patients. In this study, the authors demonstrated that the outcome of children aged <3 years with diffuse pontine glioma may be better than that of older children with this same tumor. The findings suggested that the biology of diffuse pontine glioma in young children differ from the biology of tumors that affect older patients.

    15. Sarcoma
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      A systematic meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of adjuvant chemotherapy for localized resectable soft-tissue sarcoma (pages 573–581)

      Nabeel Pervaiz, Nigel Colterjohn, Forough Farrokhyar, Richard Tozer, Alvaro Figueredo and Michelle Ghert

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23592

      The study is an updated meta-analysis of adjuvant chemotherapy for localized resectable soft-tissue sarcoma. Chemotherapy improves recurrence-free survival and overall survival with small but statistically significant absolute benefits.

    16. Discipline

      Disparities Research
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      The impact of socioeconomic status on survival after cancer in the United States : Findings from the National Program of Cancer Registries Patterns of Care Study (pages 582–591)

      Tim E. Byers, Holly J. Wolf, Katrina R. Bauer, Susan Bolick-Aldrich, Vivien W. Chen, Jack L. Finch, John P. Fulton, Maria J. Schymura, Tiefu Shen, Scott Van Heest and Xiang Yin

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23567

      The results from this study of 13,598 individuals in 7 U.S. states indicated that low socioeconomic status is a substantial risk factor for mortality after a diagnosis of cancer. Much of this association was because of a later disease stage at diagnosis and less aggressive cancer treatment.

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      Estimating personal costs incurred by a woman participating in mammography screening in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (pages 592–601)

      Donatus U. Ekwueme, Ingrid J. Hall, Lisa C. Richardson, James G. Gardner, Janet Royalty and Trevor D. Thompson

      Article first published online: 5 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23613

      In this study, the authors estimated personal costs incurred per woman participating in a national breast cancer screening program for medically underserved, low-income woman in the U.S.

    18. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Effects of an outreach and internal navigation program on breast cancer diagnosis in an urban cancer center with a large African-American population (pages 602–607)

      Sheryl G. A. Gabram, Mary Jo B. Lund, Jessica Gardner, Nadjo Hatchett, Harvey L. Bumpers, Joel Okoli, Monica Rizzo, Barbara J. Johnson, Gina B. Kirkpatrick and Otis W. Brawley

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23568

      Disparities in healthcare access, timely diagnosis, and treatment adherence in African-American women are associated with excess mortality due to breast cancer. Implementation of Patient Navigators and Community Health Advocates significantly increased the proportion of stage 0 breast cancer diagnoses and decreased the proportion of stage IV breast cancer diagnoses in an urban healthcare setting.

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      High prevalence of triple-negative tumors in an urban cancer center (pages 608–615)

      Mary Jo B. Lund, Ebonee N. Butler, Harvey L. Bumpers, Joel Okoli, Monica Rizzo, Nadjo Hatchett, Victoria L. Green, Otis W. Brawley, Gabriela M. Oprea-Ilies and Sheryl G. A. Gabram

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23569

      A disparate proportion of breast cancer deaths occur among young women and those of African-American ancestry. In the authors' cancer center, which provides care to a multiracial, underserved population, despite similarity in age at diagnosis, African-American women presented with a significantly higher prevalence of triple-negative tumors, which was found to be predictive of the poorest recurrence and mortality outcomes.

    20. Epidemiology
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      Cutaneous soft tissue sarcoma incidence patterns in the U.S. : An analysis of 12,114 cases (pages 616–627)

      Panta Rouhani, Christopher D. M. Fletcher, Susan S. Devesa and Jorge R. Toro

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23571

      On the basis of unprecedented numbers of cases, relative survival and incidence rates of cutaneous soft tissue sarcomas (CSTS) varied over time by race, sex, age, and histologic type, supporting previous findings that the histologic variants of CSTS are etiologically distinct. In particular, the rates of leiomyosarcoma (LS) and angiosarcoma (AS) increased exponentially among whites from 1980 through 2004. Both Kaposi sarcoma and dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans rates were highest among blacks, whereas LS and AS rates were highest among whites.

    21. Psychosocial Oncology
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      Use of health-related quality-of-life assessments in daily clinical oncology nursing practice : A community hospital-based intervention study (pages 628–637)

      Doranne L. Hilarius, Paul H. Kloeg, Chad M. Gundy and Neil K. Aaronson

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23623

      Incorporating standardized health-related quality of life (HRQL) assessments in daily clinical oncology nursing practice facilitates the discussion of HRQL issues and increases nurses' awareness. Additional efforts are needed to enhance the effect of routine HRQL assessments on patient management and HRQL.

    22. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Delayed emotional recovery after taxane-based chemotherapy (pages 638–647)

      Lisa M. Thornton, William E. Carson III, Charles L. Shapiro, William B. Farrar and Barbara L. Andersen

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23589

      In this 5-year longitudinal study, patients with breast cancer who received taxane-based adjuvant chemotherapy were compared with patients who received other regimens. The results indicated that receipt of taxanes was associated with delays of 6 to 12 months in patients' emotional recovery, including higher rates of depressive symptoms.

    23. Radiation Oncology
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      Toxicity of radiotherapy in patients with collagen vascular disease (pages 648–653)

      Alexander Lin, Eyad Abu-Isa, Kent A. Griffith and Edgar Ben-Josef

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23591

      Radiotherapy (RT) in the setting of collagen vascular disease is generally well tolerated, but may carry a higher risk of late toxicity. RT to the pelvis or in the setting of systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma may predispose patients to an even greater risk of severe toxicity.

    24. Symptom Control and Palliative Care
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      How do patient expectancies, quality of life, and postchemotherapy nausea interrelate? (pages 654–661)

      Ben Colagiuri, Joseph A. Roscoe, Gary R. Morrow, James N. Atkins, Jeffrey K. Giguere and Lauren K. Colman

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23594

      First-time chemotherapy patients' expectancies regarding nausea influence their actual experience of nausea after treatment and this nausea detracts from the patients' quality of life. Interventions that reduce strong expectancies for nausea are likely to decrease both the occurrence and severity of chemotherapy-induced nausea and may also improve quality of life.

  4. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cancer Scope
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Erratum (pages 662–663)

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23633

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