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Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Cancer Cytopathology

25 June 2008

Volume 114, Issue 3

Pages 141–217

Currently known as: Cancer Cytopathology

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Publisher's Note
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      Choosing battles or excuses in gynecologic cytology (pages 141–143)

      Andrew A. Renshaw

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23510

      Although gynecologic cytology is well over 50 years old, and the number of cytology publications during this period have been many, very few studies have been able to report improvements in the sensitivity of screening, and most of them have achieved this through technological innovations. Rapid prescreening achieves this rare result by working smarter, not harder, using the same technology that has been available to cytologist for years.

  2. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Publisher's Note
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      Thyroid fine-needle aspiration: Smears versus liquid-based preparations (pages 144–148)

      Britt-Marie Ljung

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23541

      Liquid-based preparation techniques, originally designed to enhance the interpretation of gynecologic cytology specimens, have been available and increasingly used for nongynecologic specimens for approximately 15 years. Analysis of available data indicate decreased rates of definitive diagnoses of cancer in the thyroid gland when using liquid-based preparations compared with conventional smears.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Publisher's Note
    1. Gynecologic Cytopathology

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      Measuring the significance of workload on performance of cytotechnologists in gynecologic cytology : A study using rapid prescreening (pages 149–154)

      Majorie Deschenes, Andrew A. Renshaw and Manon Auger

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23497

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      Despite being extensively regulated as a measure of quality, workload appears to be unrelated to performance of cytotechnologists in gynecologic cytology.

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      Diagnostic utility of phosphatase and tensin homolog, β-catenin, and p53 for endometrial carcinoma by thin-layer endometrial preparations (pages 155–164)

      Yoshiaki Norimatsu, Motoyuki Miyamoto, Tadao K. Kobayashi, Takuya Moriya, Keiko Shimizu, Kenji Yanoh, Choutatsu Tsukayama, Yasuyuki Miyake and Eiji Ohno

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23495

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      The authors present the characteristic features of morphology and molecular biology of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), β-catenin, and p53 immunocytochemistry in endometrial carcinoma using thin-layer cytologic preparations. The results indicated that immunocytochemical findings with PTEN, β-catenin, and p53, in addition to cytomorphologic features, may be useful for more accurate diagnosis of endometrial carcinoma in endometrial cytology.

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      Comparison of the performance of rapid prescreening, 10% random review, and clinical risk criteria as methods of internal quality control in cervical cytopathology (pages 165–170)

      Suelene B. N. Tavares, Nadja L. Alves de Sousa, Edna J. C. Manrique, Zair B. Pinheiro de Albuquerque, Luiz C. Zeferino and Rita G. Amaral

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23509

      The results from this study indicated that rapid prescreening (RPS) is an effective option of internal quality control. RPS performed better than the directed rescreening of negative smears based on clinical risk criteria and better than routine rescreening of 10% of negative smears for the detection of false-negative (FN) results. RPS method also permitted monitoring of the laboratory FN result rate and evaluation of the individual performances of members of the laboratory team.

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      Impact of the more restrictive definition of atypical squamous cells introduced by the 2001 Bethesda System on the sensitivity and specificity of the Papanicolaou test : A 5-year follow-up study of Papanicolaou tests originally interpreted as ASCUS, reclassified according to Bethesda 2001 criteria (pages 171–179)

      Michael J. Thrall, Stefan E. Pambuccian, Edward B. Stelow, Dan M. McKeon, Lizette Miller, Kay Savik and H. Evin Gulbahce

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23538

      There were 535 cases originally interpreted as ASCUS that 4 observers reclassified by using Bethesda 2001 criteria. With these more restrictive criteria for reporting ASC, the specificity of the Pap test increased, but its sensitivity decreased as 20% of CIN 2/3 lesions found in the follow-up of these women would have been missed because their Pap tests were downgraded to NILM by consensus reclassification.

    5. Fine-Needle Aspiration

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      Fine-needle aspiration cytology of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung : A cytohistologic correlation study of 11 cases (pages 180–186)

      Jose A. Jimenez-Heffernan, Pilar Lopez-Ferrer, Blanca Vicandi, Adrian Mariño, Eva Tejerina, Manuel Nistal and Jose M. Viguer

      Version of Record online: 23 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23539

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      Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung demonstrates a distinctive histologic pattern that is partially reflected on cytologic samples, allowing preoperative recognition in some cases. It is a difficult diagnosis and immunocytochemistry plays a critical diagnostic role.

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      Thyroid fine-needle aspiration samples inadequate for reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis (pages 187–195)

      Ivan Samija, Neven Matesa, Josip Lukac and Zvonko Kusic

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23498

      Samples inadequate for reverse transcriptase‒polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis were studied from 350 thyroid fine-needle aspiration samples. The proportion of inadequate samples for RT-PCR was higher in samples taken from leftover material in the needle (21.7%) then in samples obtained from a separate puncture (13.1%) (P = .049), and no correlation was noted between the adequacy of samples for RT-PCR and the largest dimension of the nodule.

    7. Analytical Cytopathology

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      Quantitative detection of molecular markers ProEx C (minichromosome maintenance protein 2 and topoisomerase IIa) and MIB-1 in liquid-based cervical squamous cell cytology (pages 196–203)

      Maria Donatella Beccati, Carolina Buriani, Massimo Pedriali, Sonia Rossi and Italo Nenci

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23496

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      Quantitative detection of proliferation markers ProEx C (human papillomavirus E6-E7 correlated) and MIB-1 in the diagnosis of squamous intraepithelial lesions indicated that both were valid proliferation markers in cervical cytology. Nuclear positivity was quantified successfully by computer-assisted analysis. Although there was an excellent direct correlation between the 2 markers, ProEx C was more selective and more informative for the progression of low-grade and moderate-grade precursor lesions.

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      9p21 Deletion in the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma in serous effusions additional to immunocytochemistry, DNA-ICM, and AgNOR analysis (pages 204–215)

      Fabiana Botelho de Miranda Onofre, Alexandre Sherlley Casimiro Onofre, Natalia Pomjanski, Birgit Buckstegge, Hans Juergen Grote and Alfred Böcking

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23413

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      In 33 effusions from patients with malignant mesothelioma, tumor cells were identified by cytology alone in 81.8%. The addition of DNA-ICM improved the prevalence to 87.9%, of AgNOR analysis to 97%, and of 9p21 deletion by chromosomal FISH to 100%. The combination of calretinin-positive and BerEP4-negative was found in 84.4% of effusions caused by malignant mesothelioma.

  4. Publisher's Note

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Publisher's Note
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      Publisher's note (pages 216–217)

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23579

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