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Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Cancer Cytopathology

25 October 2008

Volume 114, Issue 5

Pages 285–341

Currently known as: Cancer Cytopathology

  1. In Memoriam

    1. Top of page
    2. In Memoriam
    3. Contemporary Issue
    4. Original Articles
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      Sixten Franzen, MD, PhD, Honorary Professor, 1919–2008 (pages 285–286)

      Jerry Waisman, Lambert Skoog and Edneia Tani

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23795

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  2. Contemporary Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. In Memoriam
    3. Contemporary Issue
    4. Original Articles
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      Visual estimates of nucleus-to-nucleus ratios : Can we trust our eyes to use the Bethesda ASCUS and LSIL size criteria? (pages 287–293)

      Jared L. Schmidt, Jonathan C. Henriksen, Dan M. McKeon, Kay Savik, H. Evin Gulbahce and Stefan E. Pambuccian

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23798

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      Judgments of area ratios between the nuclei of intermediate squamous cells and those of abnormal squamous cells made by pathologists and cytotechnologists lack accuracy and reproducibility and are only minimally improved by an instructional tutorial. Particularly difficult was the differentiation between the area ratios of 2.5× to 3× and 3× to 3.5×, which define ASCUS and LSIL.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. In Memoriam
    3. Contemporary Issue
    4. Original Articles
    1. Gynecologic Cytopathology

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      Assuring the quality of quality assurance : Seeding abnormal slides into the negative Papanicolaou smears that will be rapid rescreened (pages 294–299)

      Joanne Clarke, Julia K. Thurloe, Ron C. Bowditch and Jennifer M. Roberts

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23640

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      Abnormal slides can be “seeded” successfully into daily, routine rapid rescreening of negative slides. The proportion of missed seeds was higher for glandular seeds than for squamous seeds or the more difficult seeds but was independent of the cytologists' mapping technique.

    2. Non-Gynecologic Cytopathology

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      Utility of cytology microarray constructed from effusion cell blocks for immunomarker validation (pages 300–306)

      Robert T. Pu, Thomas J. Giordano and Claire W. Michael

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23797

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      Cytological microarray was constructed from 23 effusion cell blocks representing several common tumors. It was shown to be representative of the original cell blocks with tumor cell composition and antibody staining pattern, intensity, and percentage for the 9 commonly used antibodies. Therefore, cytological microarray has a great potential in clinical research and practice as it allows rapid validation of immunocytochemical markers.

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      Cerebrospinal fluid cytology in patients with ependymoma : A bi-institutional retrospective study (pages 307–314)

      Xiaohua Qian, Liliana C. Goumnerova, Umberto De Girolami and Edmund S. Cibas

      Version of Record online: 12 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23799

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      The detection rate of ependymoma cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples is low, especially in adult patients. Exfoliated cells from ependymomas are recognizable in CSF samples, especially in patients with myxopapillary tumors and tumors with anaplastic features.

    4. Fine-Needle Aspiration

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      Chromosomal abnormalities detected by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization in fine-needle aspirates from patients with small lymphocytic lymphoma are useful for predicting survival (pages 315–322)

      Nancy P. Caraway, Elizabeth Thomas, Abha Khanna, Linda Payne, Hua-Zhong Zhang, E Lin, Michael J. Keating and Ruth L. Katz

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23796

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      Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization performed on fine-needle aspirates from small lymphocytic lymphoma patients is useful in predicting outcome. Chromosomal aberrations of 17p13.1 and 11q22 are associated with an increased risk of death.

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      Cytologic evaluation of lymphadenopathy associated with mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome : Role of immunophenotypic and molecular ancillary studies (pages 323–332)

      Reetesh K. Pai, Franklin M. Mullins, Youn H. Kim and Christina S. Kong

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23793

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      The most common presenting site of extracutaneous disease in mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome is the peripheral lymph nodes. Although fine-needle aspiration biopsy has been shown to be a valuable diagnostic technique in evaluating lymphadenopathy, its utility in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma has not been extensively studied. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy in conjunction with immunophenotyping and T-cell receptor gamma chain polymerase chain reaction demonstrated significant usefulness in evaluation of lymphadenopathy in these patients.

    6. Analytical Cytopathology

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      Plasmablastic lymphoma: Cytologic findings in 5 cases with unusual presentation (pages 333–341)

      Michelle Reid-Nicholson, Sravankumar Kavuri, Celalettin Ustun, Jennifer Crawford, Asha Nayak-Kapoor and Preetha Ramalingam

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23794

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      Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that was once believed to develop primarily in the oral cavity of persons with the human immunodeficiency virus. Numerous extraoral sites have also been reported. The goal of the current study was to define the cytomorphologic features that may help to distinguish PBL from other similar entities.

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