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Cancer

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Supplement: Cancer Survivorship Research: Mapping the New Challenges Atlanta, Georgia, Supplement to Cancer

15 September 2009

Volume 115, Issue S18

Pages i–ii, 4265–4429

  1. Supplement

    1. Top of page
    2. Supplement
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      Introduction: Charting the landscape of cancer survivors' health-related outcomes and care (pages 4265–4269)

      Lori A. Pollack, Julia H. Rowland, Corinne Crammer and Michael Stefanek

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24579

      The field of cancer survivorship is characterized by a complex and rapidly evolving landscape. This supplement presents a series of data-driven articles selected to highlight the breadth of new knowledge in this area of the cancer control continuum that were presented at the Fourth Biennial Cancer Survivorship Research Conference in Atlanta, Georgia, June 2008. Included in the volume is research on the biobehavioral impact of cancer; studies on quality-of-life and economic outcomes; and work focused on caregivers, understudied populations, and healthcare providers.

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      Cancer-Specific beliefs and survival in nonmetastatic colorectal cancer patients (pages 4270–4282)

      Hosanna Soler-Vilá, Robert Dubrow, Vivian I. Franco, Andrea K. Saathoff, Stanislav V. Kasl and Beth A. Jones

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24583

      This follow-up study is novel in that it combines data on psychosocial measures from detailed in-person interviews collected shortly after diagnosis with extensive biomedical information to study the role of cancer-specific beliefs on survival over a 15-year follow-up period. This population-based cohort oversampled African Americans to address racial differences in cancer outcomes; thus, this article contributes to the almost nonexistent literature on psychosocial predictors of survival among colorectal cancer patients involving minority patients.

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      Quality of life in a prospective cohort of elderly women with and without cancer (pages 4283–4297)

      DeAnn Lazovich, Kim Robien, Gretchen Cutler, Beth Virnig and Carol Sweeney

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24580

      By examining quality of life in a prospective cohort of elderly women with and without cancer, cancer-related effects on quality of life could be distinguished from influences of aging, comorbidity, current treatment, or second primary cancers. As a result, the authors found lower scores for the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) General Health scale and comparable SF-36 Mental Health scores among survivors relative to cancer-free women. Quality of life decrements were observed across most SF-36 scales for survivors of specific cancers, those with advanced stage, and those who had survived the longest.

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      Patterns of adaptation in patients living long term with advanced cancer (pages 4298–4310)

      Julia Hannum Rose, George Kypriotakis, Karen F. Bowman, Douglas Einstadter, Elizabeth E. O'Toole, Rhoderick Mechekano and Neal V. Dawson

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24584

      Psychospiritual well being and adaptation were explored in a study of middle-aged and older patients with advanced cancer (N = 142) who survived into their second year after diagnosis and were assessed in interviews across 4 time points. Three distinct group trajectories of psychospiritual well being were identified: low-worsening, moderate-improving, and high-stable. Age and education were correlated with group membership.

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      Intrapersonal and interpersonal consequences of protective buffering among cancer patients and caregivers (pages 4311–4325)

      Shelby L. Langer, Jonathon D. Brown and Karen L. Syrjala

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24586

      Protective buffering (hiding cancer-related thoughts and concerns from one's spouse or partner) predicted negative outcomes for those who engaged in this behavior, decreased relationship satisfaction and poorer mental health. In addition, buffering with a strong prosocial orientation (a greater desire to protect one's partner vs oneself) predicted positive outcomes among patients but negative outcomes among partners.

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      Partner-assisted emotional disclosure for patients with gastrointestinal cancer : Results from a randomized controlled trial (pages 4326–4338)

      Laura S. Porter, Francis J. Keefe, Donald H. Baucom, Herbert Hurwitz, Barry Moser, Emily Patterson and Hong Jin Kim

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24578

      Partner-assisted emotional disclosure is a brief intervention focused on facilitating the cancer patient's emotional disclosure to his or her partner. Results from this study suggested that this intervention led to increases in relationship quality and intimacy for couples in which the patient initially held back from disclosing cancer-related concerns.

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      Family psychosocial risk, distress, and service utilization in pediatric cancer : Predictive validity of the Psychosocial Assessment Tool (pages 4339–4349)

      Melissa A. Alderfer, Ifigenia Mougianis, Lamia P. Barakat, David Beele, Susan DiTaranto, Wei-Ting Hwang, Anne T. Reilly and Anne E. Kazak

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24587

      A prospective study demonstrated that the classification of families at diagnosis into 1 of 3 psychosocial risk levels based on the Psychosocial Assessment Tool, a brief parent-report screener, was relatively stable across the first 4 months of treatment. Furthermore, families classified at higher levels of psychosocial risk at diagnosis had more distress and poorer family functioning 4 months into treatment and required more psychosocial care than families at lower levels of risk.

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      The impact of cancer on spouses' labor earnings : A Population-Based Study (pages 4350–4361)

      Astri Syse, Steinar Tretli and Øystein Kravdal

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24582

      Married men's earnings are lower after cancer than they otherwise would have been, but their wives' earnings are also affected, most likely because of the care burden placed on them. Married women's cancer illness affects only their own earnings, and matters less than their male partners' malignancy for the couples' total income.

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      Time costs associated with informal caregiving for cancer survivors (pages 4362–4373)

      K. Robin Yabroff and Youngmee Kim

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24588

      Data from a national survey of caregivers of cancer survivors were used to estimate the time costs associated with informal caregiving in the 2 years after patient diagnosis with 10 of the most prevalent cancers. Valued at the median wage in 2006, time costs associated with informal caregiving were substantial and ranged from $72,702 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], $56,814-$88,590) for lung cancer patients to $38,334 (95% CI, $31,442-$45,226) for breast cancer patients.

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      Behaviors associated with ultraviolet radiation exposure in a cohort of adult survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer : A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (pages 4374–4384)

      Natasha Buchanan, Wendy Leisenring, Pauline A. Mitby, Anna T. Meadows, Leslie L. Robison, Melissa M. Hudson and Ann C. Mertens

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24581

      Pediatric cancer survivors are at higher risk for developing skin cancer due to exposure to radiation; however, the utilization of sun protection behaviors is not known. Cancer survivors in the current study reported similar sunscreen use, but less sunbathing and artificial tanning practices than their siblings.

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      Design and recruitment of the Chicago Healthy Living Study : A study of health behaviors in a diverse cohort of adult childhood cancer survivors (pages 4385–4396)

      Melinda R. Stolley, Lisa K. Sharp, Claudia Arroyo, Cherese Ruffin, Jacqueline Restrepo and Richard Campbell

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24585

      This article describes the design and recruitment strategies of a study designed to gather information on the health behaviors (diet, physical activity, smoking) and body mass index, and associated mediators in African-American, Hispanic and white childhood cancer survivors and noncancer controls.

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      The role of psychological functioning in the use of complementary and alternative methods among disease-free colorectal cancer survivors : A Report from the American Cancer Society's Studies of Cancer Survivors (pages 4397–4408)

      Kevin D. Stein, Chiewkwei Kaw, Corinne Crammer and Ted Gansler

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24591

      A population-based survey of 252 male and 277 female colorectal cancer survivors identified significant sex differences in the prevalence and psychological correlates of use of complementary and alternative methods.

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      Caring for cancer survivors : A survey of primary care physicians (pages 4409–4418)

      Sharon L. Bober, Christopher J. Recklitis, Eric G. Campbell, Elyse R. Park, Jean S. Kutner, Julie S. Najita and Lisa Diller

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24590

      Little is known regarding the attitudes, needs, and practice patterns of primary care physicians (PCPs) regarding long-term cancer survivors. Results have suggested that PCPs need and want more preparation, training, and practical guidelines to care for their long-term cancer survivors.

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      Clinical practice guidelines for the psychosocial care of cancer survivors : Current status and future prospects (pages 4419–4429)

      Paul B. Jacobsen

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24589

      Unmet psychosocial needs figure prominently among the concerns identified by survivors of adult-onset cancers after completion of their primary treatment. This article focuses on the role that development of clinical practice guidelines could play in improving the quality of psychosocial care provided in the post-treatment period.

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