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Cancer

Cover image for Cancer

15 June 2009

Volume 115, Issue 12

Pages 2595–2807

  1. News

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Editorials
    4. Original Articles
    5. Errata
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      CancerScope (pages 2595–2597)

      Carrie Printz

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24299

  2. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Editorials
    4. Original Articles
    5. Errata
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      Beyond toxicity : The challenge and importance of understanding the full impact of treatment decisions (pages 2598–2601)

      William R. Carpenter and Jeffrey Peppercorn

      Version of Record online: 13 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24310

      Because the majority of patients will experience long-term survival after a breast cancer diagnosis, increased attention appropriately has focused on the full spectrum of challenges faced by patients after the initial stages of treatment, including their employment status. Although finding a cure remains the greatest challenge in breast cancer and in many other cancer types, while pursuing that goal it will be important to continue to enhance our knowledge regarding the consequences of therapy that extend beyond toxicity, and even beyond standard measures of quality of life.

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      When medical evidence alone is simply not enough (pages 2602–2604)

      Michael A. O'Donnell

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24312

      A report in this issue by Messing and colleagues on postoperative bladder chemotherapy does much to demonstrate that medical evidence alone is not always sufficient to enable the efficient implementation of changes in clinical practice. Practice patterns, information dissemination, advocacy programs, guidelines, logistics, and reimbursement policies must all synchronize to promote effective change.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Editorials
    4. Original Articles
    5. Errata
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
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      The effect of modafinil on cognitive function in breast cancer survivors (pages 2605–2616)

      Sadhna Kohli, Susan G. Fisher, Yolande Tra, M. Jacob Adams, Mark E. Mapstone, Keith A. Wesnes, Joseph A. Roscoe and Gary R. Morrow

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24287

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      Modafinil provides significant improvements in some memory and attention skills for breast cancer patients after their treatment of cancer. Although further study is needed, these findings suggest that modafinil may enhance quality of life in this patient population.

    2. Gastrointestinal Disease
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      Comparing safety and efficacy of first-line irinotecan/fluoropyrimidine combinations in elderly versus nonelderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer : Findings from the bolus, infusional, or capecitabine with camptostar-celecoxib study (pages 2617–2629)

      Nadine A. Jackson, José Barrueco, Raoudha Soufi-Mahjoubi, John Marshall, Edith Mitchell, Xiaoxi Zhang and Jeffrey Meyerhardt

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24305

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      Irinotecan/fluoropyrimidine combinations are well tolerated in the elderly population, with similar efficacy to that found in nonelderly patients in first-line metastatic colorectal cancer.

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      Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 change during chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma (pages 2630–2639)

      Michele Reni, Stefano Cereda, Gianpaolo Balzano, Paolo Passoni, Alessia Rognone, Clara Fugazza, Elena Mazza, Alessandro Zerbi, Valerio Di Carlo and Eugenio Villa

      Version of Record online: 7 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24302

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      Baseline carbohydrate antigen 19-9 was an independent prognostic factor for survival and could be considered as a stratification factor in trials for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The authors concluded that biochemical response may be proposed as a complementary measure to radiologic response to assess chemotherapy activity better and to guide treatment decisions in clinical practice.

    4. Genitourinary Disease
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      SALL4 is a novel sensitive and specific marker for metastatic germ cell tumors, with particular utility in detection of metastatic yolk sac tumors (pages 2640–2651)

      Dengfeng Cao, Peter A. Humphrey and Robert W. Allan

      Version of Record online: 13 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24308

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      SALL4 immunohistochemical stains are strongly positive in all metastatic seminomas, dysgerminomas, embryonal carcinomas, and yolk sac tumors. SALL4 is a novel sensitive and specific marker for metastatic germ cell tumors and particularly useful for detecting metastatic yolk sac tumor.

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      Gemcitabine and paclitaxel every 2 weeks in patients with previously untreated urothelial carcinoma (pages 2652–2659)

      Fabio Calabrò, Vito Lorusso, Gerardo Rosati, Luigi Manzione, Luca Frassineti, Teodoro Sava, Eugenio Donato Di Paula, Silvia Alonso and Cora N. Sternberg

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24313

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      In this multicenter trial, a convenient outpatient regimen of gemcitabine and paclitaxel given every 2 weeks was evaluated as first-line chemotherapy in patients with urothelial carcinoma. The results indicated that the regimen has promise and may be considered for patients who are unable to receive cisplatin and those who have metastatic urothelial cancer and compromised renal function; however, it cannot be recommended for routine use.

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      Treatment of nonmuscle invading bladder cancer: Do physicians in the United States practice evidence based medicine? : The use and economic implications of intravesical chemotherapy after transurethral resection of bladder tumors (pages 2660–2670)

      Ralph Madeb, Dragan Golijanin, Katia Noyes, Susan Fisher, Judith J. Stephenson, Stacey R. Long, Joy Knopf, Gary H. Lyman and Edward M. Messing

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24311

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      Urologists in the United States rarely use a single instillation of intravesical chemotherapy immediately after transurethral resection of the bladder, despite compelling level I evidence that it will significantly reduce the rate of recurrence of low-risk nonmuscle invading bladder cancer. The authors estimate conservatively that if this practice were widely adopted, a national annual cost saving of $19.8 to $24.8 million would occur.

    7. Gynecologic Oncology
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      Sperm-associated antigen 9 is a biomarker for early cervical carcinoma (pages 2671–2683)

      Manoj Garg, Deepika Kanojia, Sudha Salhan, Sushma Suri, Anju Gupta, Nirmal Kumar Lohiya and Anil Suri

      Version of Record online: 26 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24293

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      In early stage cervical cancer patients, high sperm-associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) protein expression exhibited significantly higher antibody response against SPAG9 compared with moderate SPAG9 protein expression in cervical cancer patients, supporting its potential role in early detection and diagnosis in cervical cancer management.

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      EphA2 overexpression is associated with lack of hormone receptor expression and poor outcome in endometrial cancer (pages 2684–2692)

      Aparna A. Kamat, Donna Coffey, William M. Merritt, Elizabeth Nugent, Diana Urbauer, Yvonne G. Lin, Creighton Edwards, Russell Broaddus, Robert L. Coleman and Anil K. Sood

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24335

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      In the current study, the authors demonstrated that the ephrin A2 tyrosine kinase receptor (EphA2) was overexpressed in 50% of endometrioid endometrial cancer samples, was associated with aggressive phenotypic features, and was an independent predictor of poor clinical outcome. Thus, the findings indicated that EphA2 may be an important therapeutic target, especially in patients with hormone receptor-negative endometrial carcinoma.

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      Association of the progesterone receptor gene with endometrial cancer risk in a Chinese population (pages 2693–2700)

      Wang-Hong Xu, Ji-rong Long, Wei Zheng, Zhi-xian Ruan, Qiuyin Cai, Jia-rong Cheng, Yong-Bing Xiang and Xiao-Ou Shu

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24289

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      The results of this population-based case-control study indicated that polymorphisms in the 3′ flanking region of the progesterone gene are associated with the risk of endometrial cancer.

    10. Head and Neck Disease
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      Human papillomaviruses are identified in a subgroup of sinonasal squamous cell carcinomas with favorable outcome (pages 2701–2709)

      Llucia Alos, Susana Moyano, Alfons Nadal, Isam Alobid, Jose L. Blanch, Edgar Ayala, Belén Lloveras, Wim Quint, Antonio Cardesa and Jaume Ordi

      Version of Record online: 13 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24309

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      Infection by human papillomavirus is associated with a subgroup of sinonasal squamous cell carcinomas that are easily identifiable with p16INK4a immunostaining and have a significantly better prognosis.

    11. Hepatobiliary Disease
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      Clinical features and prognostic factors in patients with bone metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma receiving external beam radiotherapy (pages 2710–2720)

      Jian He, Zhao-Chong Zeng, Zhao-You Tang, Jia Fan, Jian Zhou, Meng-Su Zeng, Jian-Hua Wang, Jing Sun, Bing Chen, Ping Yang and Bai-Sheng Pan

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24300

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      This study provides detailed information regarding clinical features, survival outcomes, and prognostic factors for hepatocellular carcinoma with bone metastases in a relatively large cohort of patients treated with external beam radiotherapy. These prognostic factors will help in determining which dose and fraction are appropriate.

    12. Lung Disease
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      Prognostic factors differ by tumor stage for small cell lung cancer : A pooled analysis of North Central Cancer Treatment Group trials (pages 2721–2731)

      Nathan R. Foster, Sumithra J. Mandrekar, Steven E. Schild, Garth D. Nelson, Kendrith M. Rowland Jr., Richard L. Deming, Timothy F. Kozelsky, Randolph S. Marks, James R. Jett and Alex A. Adjei

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24314

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      A pooled analysis of 14 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) studies identified baseline creatinine levels and the number of metastatic sites at baseline as important prognostic factors in patients with SCLC who had extensive-stage disease in addition to the well established factors of sex, age, and performance status. In patients who had limited-stage SCLC, only age and sex were identified as important prognostic factors.

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      Prognostic significance of carbonic anhydrase IX expression by cancer-associated fibroblasts in lung adenocarcinoma (pages 2732–2743)

      Masayuki Nakao, Genichiro Ishii, Kanji Nagai, Akikazu Kawase, Hirotsugu Kenmotsu, Hidehiro Kon-no, Tomoyuki Hishida, Mitsuyo Nishimura, Junji Yoshida and Atsushi Ochiai

      Version of Record online: 13 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24303

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      The purpose of the current study was to assess the biologic significance of carbonic anhydrase (CA) IX expression by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in adenocarcinoma of the lung. CA IX expression by CAFs was observed in 39 (24.7%) of 158 consecutive resected cases of lung adenocarcinoma, and its expression was associated with conventional prognostic factors and a poor outcome.

    14. Sarcoma
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      Patterns of care in a population-based sample of soft tissue sarcoma patients in the United States (pages 2744–2754)

      Shirish M. Gadgeel, Linda C. Harlan, Christopher A. Zeruto, Michael Osswald and Ann G. Schwartz

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24307

      Data regarding the patterns of care of patients with soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are relatively sparse. The authors analyzed 1369 STS patients diagnosed in 2002 and sampled from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries. The median age of patients was 60 years. Negative margin resection was obtained in only 50% of patients. Complete resection was less frequent in patients ≥50 years old. Radiation therapy was used in 53% of patients with extremity sarcomas but in only 20% to 30% of the patients with STS at other sites. About 27% of all patients received chemotherapy. Surgical resection, tumor grade, tumor size, use of radiation therapy, and age significantly influenced survival. Patterns of care of STS differ based on the site of the tumor. Age of the patient was significantly associated with therapy and patient outcome.

    15. Discipline

      Disparities Research
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      Rural reversal? : Rural-urban disparities in late-stage cancer risk in Illinois (pages 2755–2764)

      Sara McLafferty and Fahui Wang

      Version of Record online: 11 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24306

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      For breast, colorectal, lung, and prostate cancers in Illinois, the risk of a late-stage diagnosis was highest in the City of Chicago and decreased with increasing rurality and followed an inverse, J-shaped gradient that included an upturn in risk in the most isolated rural areas.

    16. Epidemiology
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      Relationship between caffeine intake and plasma sex hormone concentrations in premenopausal and postmenopausal women (pages 2765–2774)

      Joanne Kotsopoulos, A. Heather Eliassen, Stacey A. Missmer, Susan E. Hankinson and Shelley S. Tworoger

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24328

      Data from this cross-sectional study suggest that caffeine may alter circulating levels of luteal estrogens and sex hormone–binding globulin, representing possible mechanisms by which coffee or caffeine may be associated with pre- and postmenopausal malignancies, respectively.

    17. Outcomes Research
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      Factors influencing changes in employment among women with newly diagnosed breast cancer (pages 2775–2782)

      Michael J. Hassett, A. James O'Malley and Nancy L. Keating

      Version of Record online: 13 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24301

      Among 3233 employed, insured women with breast cancer, chemotherapy recipients were more likely than nonrecipients to experience a major disruption in employment in the year after diagnosis. This finding may aid treatment decision making and could foster the development of interventions that support a patient's ability to continue working after treatment.

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      Frequency, nature, effects, and correlates of conflicts of interest in published clinical cancer research (pages 2783–2791)

      Reshma Jagsi, Nathan Sheets, Aleksandra Jankovic, Amy R. Motomura, Sudha Amarnath and Peter A. Ubel

      Version of Record online: 11 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24315

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      This study reviews research published in 8 high-impact journals in 2006, finding that self-reported conflicts of interest characterize a substantial minority of the recently published high-impact clinical cancer research assessed. It concludes that attempts to disentangle the cancer research effort from industry merit further attention, and journals should embrace both rigorous standards of disclosure and heightened scrutiny when conflicts exist.

    19. Pediatric Oncology
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      The calcium-sensing receptor and parathyroid hormone-related protein are expressed in differentiated, favorable neuroblastic tumors (pages 2792–2803)

      Carmen de Torres, Helena Beleta, Rubén Díaz, Núria Toran, Eva Rodríguez, Cinzia Lavarino, Idoia García, Sandra Acosta, Mariona Suñol and Jaume Mora

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24304

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      Differentiated histopathology is a favorable prognostic factor in neuroblastic tumors, but the molecular pathways that underlie neuroblastoma differentiation are not understood completely. The authors report that the calcium-sensing receptor gene and the parathyroid hormone-related protein gene were expressed in differentiated, favorable neuroblastic tumors. Both genes were up-regulated with treatment or with the in vitro induction of differentiation.

  4. Errata

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Editorials
    4. Original Articles
    5. Errata
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      Erratum (page 2804)

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24332

      This article corrects:
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      Erratum (page 2805)

      Version of Record online: 7 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24097

      This article corrects:

      Evaluating the supportive care costs of severe radiochemotherapy-induced mucositis and pharyngitis1

      Vol. 113, Issue 6, 1446–1452, Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2008

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      Erratum (page 2806)

      Version of Record online: 7 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24454

      This article corrects:

      Prevalence and clinical impact of anaplasia in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma1

      Vol. 113, Issue 11, 3242–3247, Version of Record online: 4 NOV 2008

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      Erratum (page 2807)

      Version of Record online: 7 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24452

      This article corrects:

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