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Cancer

Cover image for Cancer

15 August 2009

Volume 115, Issue 16

Pages 3591–3816

  1. News

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Commentary
    4. Editorial
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
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      CancerScope (pages 3591–3593)

      Carrie Printz

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24402

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  2. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Commentary
    4. Editorial
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
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      Uterine papillary serous carcinoma : A new paradigm for treatment? (pages 3594–3596)

      Christina M. Annunziata and Herbert L. Kotz

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24425

      Uterine carcinoma of papillary serous histology (UPSC) is an aggressive tumor with a relatively poor overall survival. Few randomized clinical trials directed toward uterine cancer have focused specifically on stage I disease of the papillary serous variant, leaving the best treatment for these women undefined. The current study by Nickels Fader et al retrospectively analyzed outcome in 142 patients with stage I UPSC who were treated with surgery followed by observation, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy ± radiotherapy, and found a lower rate of recurrence on those who received chemotherapy.

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      Reducing inequities in cancer care : The role of cancer registries (pages 3597–3605)

      Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Lisa Mackenzie, David Hill, Sharon Campbell and Donna Turner

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24415

      A standardized level of care, based on best evidence, needs to be provided to cancer patients to overcome present inequities in care provision and access. To assist in overcoming this problem, it is suggested that the role of existing cancer registries be broadened to include support for more cancer control activities, including assessment of treatment patterns and outcomes, post-treatment surveillance (follow-up), and identifying cancer patients' unmet needs to reduce the psychosocial burden on cancer patients.

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Commentary
    4. Editorial
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
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      The search for meaning—Symptoms and transvaginal sonography screening for ovarian cancer : Silent no more (pages 3606–3608)

      Ilana Cass

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24403

      The use of a symptoms index to screen for ovarian cancer did not significantly improve the earlier detection of ovarian cancer compared with transvaginal ultrasound in the study cohort described by Pavlik and colleagues. Despite limitations in the design of this study, further research to define an optimal symptoms index which can be incorporated into ovarian cancer screening programs is warranted.

  4. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Commentary
    4. Editorial
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
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      Assessment of K-ras mutation : A step toward personalized medicine for patients with colorectal cancer (pages 3609–3617)

      Yixing Jiang, Eric T. Kimchi, Kevin F. Staveley-O'Carroll, Hua Cheng and Jaffer A. Ajani

      Version of Record online: 12 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24434

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      This review focuses on the impact of the K-ras mutation in the development, clinical outcomes, and treatment selection of colorectal cancer. Mutations in the K-ras gene have been associated with aggressive tumor biology. K-ras mutational analysis is an important step in the overarching goal of developing personalized medicine.

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      Targeted inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (pages 3618–3630)

      Anil Kapoor and Robert A. Figlin

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24409

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      The importance of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) as a novel targeted mechanism in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma has been validated in phase 3 clinical trials. Compelling clinical evidence supports the effectiveness of targeting mTOR across a wide range of patient characteristics, disease features, and clinical situations.

  5. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Commentary
    4. Editorial
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
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      Patterns and risk factors associated with aromatase inhibitor-related arthralgia among breast cancer survivors (pages 3631–3639)

      Jun J. Mao, Carrie Stricker, Deborah Bruner, Sharon Xie, Marjorie A. Bowman, John T. Farrar, Brandon T. Greene and Angela DeMichele

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24419

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      In a survey of 300 women with stage I through III breast cancer who were receiving aromatase inhibitors (AIs), the authors observed that 47% of participants attributed AI as a cause of their current arthralgia, and symptoms often began within the first 3 months of therapy. The length of time since cessation of menstrual function was related inversely to reports of AI-related arthralgia, suggesting that estrogen withdrawal may play a role in the mechanism of this disorder.

    2. Gastrointestinal Disease
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      Results and patterns of failure in patients treated with adjuvant combined chemoradiation therapy for resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma (pages 3640–3650)

      Jona A. Hattangadi, Theodore S. Hong, Beow Y. Yeap and Harvey J. Mamon

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24410

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      The results from this retrospective review of experience at Massachusetts General Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital did not support the hypothesis that properly delivered radiation in the adjuvant setting has a deleterious effect on the survival of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Ultimately, however, further randomized controlled studies will be required to define the role of adjuvant therapy in this disease.

    3. Genitourinary Disease
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      Analysis of PTEN and HIF-1α and correlation with efficacy in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma treated with temsirolimus versus interferon-α (pages 3651–3660)

      Robert A. Figlin, Paul de Souza, David McDermott, Janice P. Dutcher, Anna Berkenblit, Alexandra Thiele, Mizue Krygowski, Andrew Strahs, Jay Feingold, Joseph Boni and Gary Hudes

      Version of Record online: 12 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24438

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      Patients demonstrated overall and progression-free survival benefit when treated with temsirolimus regardless of PTEN and HIF1 α status.

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      Alcohol consumption, finasteride, and prostate cancer risk : Results from the prostate cancer prevention trial (pages 3661–3669)

      Zhihong Gong, Alan R. Kristal, Jeannette M. Schenk, Catherine M. Tangen, Phyllis J. Goodman and Ian M. Thompson

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24423

      Heavy, daily drinking may raise the risk of high-grade prostate cancer. In the current study, a history of heavy drinking made finasteride ineffective in reducing prostate cancer risk.

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      Integrated data from 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trials of active cellular immunotherapy with sipuleucel-T in advanced prostate cancer (pages 3670–3679)

      Celestia S. Higano, Paul F. Schellhammer, Eric J. Small, Patrick A. Burch, John Nemunaitis, Lianng Yuh, Nicole Provost and Mark W. Frohlich

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24429

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      The integrated results of 2 randomized studies demonstrate a survival benefit for patients treated with sipuleucel-T compared with those treated with placebo. The generally modest toxicity profile, coupled with the survival benefit, suggests a favorable risk-benefit ratio for sipuleucel-T in patients with advanced prostate cancer.

    6. Gynecologic Oncology
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      Increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression, CD3-positive cell infiltration, and oxidative stress in premalignant lesions of the cervix (pages 3680–3688)

      Yenddy Carrero, Diana Callejas, Freddy Alaña, Chiquinquirá Silva, Raimy Mindiola and Jesús Mosquera

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24411

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      This study demonstrated increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, CD3 lymphocytes, and oxidative stress in tissues from patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

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      The search for meaning—Symptoms and transvaginal sonography screening for ovarian cancer : Predicting malignancy (pages 3689–3698)

      Edward J. Pavlik, Brook A. Saunders, Stacey Doran, Katherine W. McHugh, Frederick R. Ueland, Christopher P. DeSimone, Paul D. DePriest, Rachel A. Ware, Richard J. Kryscio and John R. van Nagell Jr

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24407

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      Symptoms can identify ovarian malignancies, but not as well as transvaginal sonography. The current findings indicated that: 1) tumors that screen negative by both ultrasound and a symptoms index are likely to be benign, and 2) adding symptoms information that has weight equal to the weight of ultrasound only slightly improves the discrimination of malignancy.

    8. Head and Neck Disease
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      Therapeutic effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) on mucositis in patients undergoing radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, for head and neck cancer : A double-blind placebo-controlled prospective phase 2 multi-institutional clinical trial (pages 3699–3708)

      Hong Gyun Wu, Si Yeol Song, Yeon Sil Kim, Young Taek Oh, Chang Geol Lee, Ki Chang Keum, Yong Chan Ahn and Sang-wook Lee

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24414

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      We evaluated the efficacy of topically applied human recombinant epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) for the treatment of oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy (RT) in patients with head and neck cancer. Of the 113 patients included in the study, EGF significantly reduced the incidence of severe oral mucositis at the primary endpoint (P = .0246). The EGF oral spray is a safe and effective treatment for oral mucositis in patients undergoing RT for head and neck cancer.

    9. Hematologic Malignancies
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      Significance of suboptimal response to imatinib, as defined by the European LeukemiaNet, in the long-term outcome of patients with early chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (pages 3709–3718)

      Yesid Alvarado, Hagop Kantarjian, Susan O'Brien, Stefan Faderl, Gautam Borthakur, Jan Burger, William Wierda, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, Jianqin Shan and Jorge Cortes

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24418

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      The results of the current study suggested that suboptimal response was a heterogeneous category, and some patients had an outcome that mirrored that of patients with failed therapy. Interventions aimed at improving this outcome are required.

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      Wilms tumor 1 gene mutations are associated with a higher risk of recurrence in young adults with acute myeloid leukemia : A Study From the Acute Leukemia French Association (pages 3719–3727)

      Aline Renneville, Nicolas Boissel, Virginie Zurawski, Laura Llopis, Valéria Biggio, Olivier Nibourel, Nathalie Philippe, Xavier Thomas, Hervé Dombret and Claude Preudhomme

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24442

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      In the current study, the authors retrospectively screened Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) exon 7 and 9 mutations in a cohort of 268 young adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who were treated on the Acute Leukemia French Association 9802 trial. Patients with WT1 mutations had a shorter overall survival (P = .01) and a higher risk of recurrence (P = .0008) than patients with the wild–type WT1.

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      Array comparative genomic hybridization identifies genetic regions associated with outcome in aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (pages 3728–3737)

      Cristina Robledo, Juan L. García, Dolores Caballero, Eulogio Conde, Reyes Arranz, Teresa Flores, Carlos Grande, José Rodríguez, Eva García, Ana I. Sáez, Marcos González, Norma C. Gutiérrez, Miguel A. Piris and Jesús M. Hernández

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24430

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      Array comparative genomic hybridization identified multiple regions with common copy number changes in 40 patients with high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who were treated homogeneously with a regimen of dose-escalated cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) and intensification before high-dose therapy/autologous stem cell transplantation (Mega-CHOP). The results indicated that genomic changes may be associated with outcomes and response to Mega-CHOP.

    12. Hepatobiliary Disease
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      Candidate therapeutic agents for hepatocellular cancer can be identified from phenotype-associated gene expression signatures (pages 3738–3748)

      Chiara Braconi, Fanyin Meng, Erica Swenson, Lyudmyla Khrapenko, Nianyuan Huang and Tushar Patel

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24417

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      A computational bioinformatics analysis based on targeting a cancer-specific phenotype was used to identify novel anticancer therapeutics for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    13. Neuro-Oncology
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      Correlative analysis of gene expression profile and prognosis in patients with gliomatosis cerebri (pages 3749–3757)

      Oscar Fernando D'Urso, Pietro Ivo D'Urso, Santo Marsigliante, Carlo Storelli, Giuseppe Luzi, Cosimo Damiano Gianfreda, Antonio Montinaro, Alessandro Distante and Pasqualino Ciappetta

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24435

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      By following the expression profiles of 23 gene features by means of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the authors were able to predict the prognosis of 59 gliomatosis cerebri patients after biopsies.

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      Glioblastoma in the elderly : The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience (1997-2007) (pages 3758–3766)

      Fabio M. Iwamoto, Anna R. Cooper, Anne S. Reiner, Lakshmi Nayak and Lauren E. Abrey

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24413

      A total of 394 glioblastoma patients aged ≥65 years at diagnosis (median age, 71.9 years; 59% men) were retrospectively studied. The median overall survival was 8.6 months; in a multivariate analysis, younger age, better Karnofsky performance status, single tumor, surgical resection, and chemotherapy were found to be independent predictors of survival.

    15. Sarcoma
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      Risk of local recurrence after deltoid-sparing resection for osteosarcoma of the proximal humerus (pages 3767–3773)

      Giri R. Gupta, Alan W. Yasko, Valerae O. Lewis, Christopher P. Cannon, A. Kevin Raymond, Shreyaskumar Patel and Patrick P. Lin

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24443

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      Preservation of the deltoid muscle after resection of the proximal humerus is important to reconstructive surgery for the shoulder. Careful selection of patients for deltoid-preserving resection may be critical, because the risk of recurrence may be elevated with routine use of the procedure.

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      Lung radiofrequency ablation in patients with pulmonary metastases from musculoskeletal sarcomas : An initial experience (R#2) (pages 3774–3781)

      Tomoki Nakamura, Akihiko Matsumine, Koichiro Yamakado, Takao Matsubara, Haruyuki Takaki, Atsuhiro Nakatsuka, Kan Takeda, Daisuke Abo, Tadashi Shimizu and Atsumasa Uchida

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24420

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      The authors retrospectively evaluated the response of lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation in patients with lung metastases from musculoskeletal sarcomas. Prognostic factors identified in our study will help to stratify those patients who may benefit from lung RF ablation.

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Erratum

      Vol. 115, Issue 17, 4041, Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2009

    17. Skin
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      Genomic instability in the epidermis induced by atomic bomb (A-bomb) radiation : A long-lasting health effect in A-bomb survivors (pages 3782–3790)

      Yuki Naruke, Masahiro Nakashima, Keiji Suzuki, Hisayoshi Kondo, Tomayoshi Hayashi, Midori Soda and Ichiro Sekine

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24405

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      An increased risk of cancer has continued for decades and the incidence of certain types of cancer remains higher in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors than in controlled populations. This study demonstrated the endogenous activation of DNA damage response in the epidermis of A-bomb survivors who were exposed to radiation at a closer distance to the hypocenter, suggesting genomic instability as a late effect of A-bomb radiation that may be a cause of cancer predisposition in survivors.

    18. Discipline

      Disparities Research
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      Racial differences in colorectal cancer survival in the Detroit Metropolitan area (pages 3791–3800)

      Ben Yan, Anne-Michelle Noone, Cecilia Yee, Mousumi Banerjee, Kendra Schwartz and Michael S. Simon

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24408

      After multivariate adjustment for demographic, clinical factors, and socioeconomic status, race no longer had a significant impact on survival from colorectal cancer among a cohort of African American and White American individuals in the Detroit Metropolitan Area.

    19. Epidemiology
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      Increasing incidence of differentiated thyroid cancer in the United States, 1988–2005 (pages 3801–3807)

      Amy Y. Chen, Ahmedin Jemal and Elizabeth M. Ward

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24416

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      The objective of the current study was to investigate the trends in increasing incidence of differentiated (papillary and follicular) thyroid cancer by size, age, race, and sex. The increased incidence across all tumor sizes suggested that increased diagnostic scrutiny was not the sole explanation and that other explanations, including environmental influences and molecular pathways, should be investigated.

    20. Pediatric Oncology
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      Racial/ethnic diversity in children's oncology clinical trials : Ten Years Later (pages 3808–3816)

      Mary Jo Lund, Mark T. Eliason, Ann E. Haight, Kevin C. Ward, John L. Young and Rebecca D. Pentz

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24437

      Overall racial/ethnic groups are proportionally represented, but less than one-third of eligible children (ages birth to 19 years) are enrolled in oncology clinical trials. Some specific subgroups may be under-represented and may benefit from targeted attention, including the youngest black and Hispanic children, Hispanic females, and particularly white adolescents ages 15 to 19 years.

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