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Cancer

Cover image for Cancer

15 January 2009

Volume 115, Issue 2

Pages 233–464

  1. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Original Article
    6. Original Articles
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  2. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Original Article
    6. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Novel agents in myeloma: An exciting saga (pages 236–242)

      Tomer Mark, Ruben Niesvizky and Morton Coleman

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24040

      A therapeutic renaissance in the history of cancer therapy has been unfolding with the recent development of what has been termed the ‘novel agents’ for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Original Article
    6. Original Articles
    1. Disease Site

      Endocrine Disease
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      Limited prognostic value of the 2004 International Union Against Cancer staging classification for adrenocortical carcinoma : Proposal for a Revised TNM Classification (pages 243–250)

      Martin Fassnacht, Sarah Johanssen, Marcus Quinkler, Peter Bucsky, Holger S. Willenberg, Felix Beuschlein, Massimo Terzolo, Hans-Helge Mueller, Stefanie Hahner, Bruno Allolio and for the German Adrenocortical Carcinoma Registry Group and the European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24030

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      To the authors' knowledge, the current study is the first validation of the 2004 International Union Against Cancer TNM classification for adrenocortical carcinoma using detailed clinical data from 416 patients who were registered with the German Adrenocortical Carcinoma Registry. The analysis demonstrated limitations of the 2004 staging system, and a new TNM classification (the European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors classification) is proposed.

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      Prevention of postoperative hypocalcemia with routine oral calcium and vitamin D supplements in patients with differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma undergoing total thyroidectomy plus central neck dissection (pages 251–258)

      Jong-Lyel Roh, Jae-Yong Park and Chan-Il Park

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24027

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      Of 197 patients, 49 underwent total thyroidectomy alone, and 148 underwent total thyroidectomy plus central neck dissection. The latter were randomized to oral calcium, calcium plus vitamin D, or no supplements. Central neck dissection significantly increased postoperative hypocalcemia rate, which was prevented by calcium and vitamin D supplements without adverse effects.

    3. Gastrointestinal Disease
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      Survival of distinct Asian groups among colorectal cancer cases in California (pages 259–270)

      Hoa Le, Argyrios Ziogas, Thomas H. Taylor, Steven M. Lipkin and Jason A. Zell

      Version of Record online: 24 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24034

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      Genetic variation among different ethnic groups plays role in colorectal cancer (CRC) in Asians, in both carcinogenesis and in response to therapy. Although the authors found survival after CRC diagnosis to be improved for Asians in general, significant survival differences were observed only in specific Asian subsets. Survival among Asians appears to be affected less by socioeconomic status or treatment disparities than by biologic factors.

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      Microsatellite instability and DNA ploidy in colorectal cancer : Potential implications for patients undergoing systematic surveillance after resection (pages 271–282)

      Kjetil Søreide, Aida Slewa, Pål J. Stokkeland, Bianca van Diermen, Emiel A. M. Janssen, Jon Arne Søreide, Jan P. A. Baak and Hartwig Kørner

      Version of Record online: 24 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24024

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      Microsatellite instable colorectal cancers (CRCs) were less likely to develop distant metastasis and to have an increased risk for new or recurrent CRC within the first 3 years after resection. If the current results are validated, then they may help stratify patients to a more target-oriented surveillance after surgery.

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      Gene expression signature for recurrence in stage III colorectal cancers (pages 283–292)

      Toshiaki Watanabe, Takashi Kobunai, Etsuko Sakamoto, Yoko Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi Konishi, Atsushi Horiuchi, Ryu Shimada, Toshinori Oka and Hirokazu Nagawa

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24023

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      The study showed that gene expression profiling is useful in predicting recurrence in stage III colorectal cancer. The authors identified CABIN1 among discriminating genes that may play a key role in the development of recurrence.

    6. Genitourinary Disease
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      Major 30-day complications after radical radiotherapy : A Population-Based Analysis and Comparison With Surgery (pages 293–302)

      Shabbir M. H. Alibhai, Marc Leach and Padraig Warde

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24008

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      Major complications that occurred within 30 days after radiotherapy (RT) were investigated in a large population-based cohort of men and were compared to complication rates in a population-based sample of men who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) during the same period. The results indicated that short-term complications requiring hospital-based management were relatively uncommon after RT, commonly increased with patient age and comorbidity, and generally declined over time and that, compared with RP, RT was associated with lower complication rates.

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      Comparison of models to predict clinical failure after radical prostatectomy (pages 303–310)

      Scott E. Eggener, Andrew J. Vickers, Angel M. Serio, Michael J. Donovan, Faisal M. Khan, Valentina Bayer-Zubek, David Verbel, Carlos Cordon-Cardo, Victor E. Reuter, Fernando J. Bianco Jr and Peter T. Scardino

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24016

      Models are available to accurately predict biochemical disease recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy. Because not all patients who experience BCR will progress to metastatic disease, it is appealing to determine postoperatively which patients are likely to manifest systemic disease. The authors compared the ability of postoperative models to predict metastatic disease following radical prostatectomy.

    8. Gynecologic Oncology
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      Hyperthermia-treated mesenchymal stem cells exert antitumor effects on human carcinoma cell line (pages 311–323)

      Jung Ah Cho, Ho Park, Hee Kyung Kim, Eun Hye Lim, Sang Won Seo, Joong Sub Choi and Kyo Won Lee

      Version of Record online: 24 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24032

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      Compared with normal mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), hyperthermia-treated MSCs showed higher antitumor effects on tumor cells. The secreted molecules from hyperthermia-treated MSCs induced tumor cells to undergo death by mediating growth inhibition, DNA condensation, abnormal cell cycle, and intracellular molecular changes.

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      Consideration of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer in BRCA mutation-negative familial ovarian cancers (pages 324–333)

      Stacey A. South, Heidi Vance, Carolyn Farrell, Richard A. DiCioccio, Cathy Fahey, M. Steven Piver and Kerry J. Rodabaugh

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24012

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      Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer should be considered when evaluating patients with suspected hereditary ovarian cancer who have had negative BRCA gene mutation testing.

    10. Head and Neck
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      Defining a molecular phenotype for benign and malignant parathyroid tumors (pages 334–344)

      Gustavo G. Fernandez-Ranvier, Elham Khanafshar, David Tacha, Mariwil Wong, Electron Kebebew, Quan-Yang Duh and Orlo H. Clark

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24037

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      Although it is frequently difficult to determine histologically whether a parathyroid tumor is a parathyroid carcinoma, parathyromatosis, or an atypical parathyroid adenoma, loss of parafibromin and Rb expression and overexpression of galectin-3 generally distinguish parathyroid carcinoma from other parathyroid tumors. Parathyromatosis does not appear to be a low-grade parathyroid carcinoma.

    11. Hematologic Malignancies
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      Bacterial artificial chromosome array-based comparative genomic hybridization using paired formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and fresh frozen tissue specimens in multiple myeloma (pages 345–354)

      Patrick A. Lennon, Yi Zhuang, Diane Pierson, Xiang Zhang, Chris Williams, Cintia Perez and Pei Lin

      Version of Record online: 24 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24021

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      Multiple myeloma often harbors many chromosomal aberrations, and fresh frozen tissues currently are considered the most reliable for molecular genetic analysis; however archived, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues are easily retrievable. In this study, bacterial artificial chromosome array-based comparative genomic hybridization was used to analyze paired archived and fresh samples to determine its efficacy in analyzing archived materials.

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      Galactomannan serves as a surrogate endpoint for outcome of pulmonary invasive aspergillosis in neutropenic hematology patients (pages 355–362)

      Johan Maertens, Kristel Buvé, Koen Theunissen, Wouter Meersseman, Eric Verbeken, Gregor Verhoef, Johan Van Eldere and Katrien Lagrou

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24022

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      In neutropenic patients with seropositive invasive aspergillosis, serum galactomannan index outcome strongly correlates with survival, autopsy findings, and response outcome.

  4. Original Article

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Original Article
    6. Original Articles
    1. Disease Site

      Hematologic Malignancies
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      Validation of a new prognostic index for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (pages 363–372)

      Tait D. Shanafelt, Greg Jenkins, Timothy G. Call, Clive S. Zent, Susan Slager, Deborah A. Bowen, Susan Schwager, Curtis A. Hanson, Diane F. Jelinek and Neil E. Kay

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24004

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      A prognostic index based on widely available clinical and laboratory features was recently developed to predict survival among patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The authors used the Mayo Clinic CLL database to evaluate the validity and reproducibility of the new prognostic index. They confirmed the ability of a newly developed prognostic index risk category to predict survival among patients with previously untreated CLL and also extended the utility of the index by demonstrating that it is useful at diagnosis, retains prognostic value when applied exclusively to Rai stage 0 patients (P = .03), is effective in nonreferred patients (P < .0001), and predicts time to treatment (P < .0001).

  5. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Original Article
    6. Original Articles
    1. Disease Site

      Hematologic Malignancies
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      Chemoimmunotherapy may overcome the adverse prognostic significance of 11q deletion in previously untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (pages 373–380)

      Apostolia-Maria Tsimberidou, Constantine Tam, Lynne V. Abruzzo, Susan O'Brien, William G. Wierda, Susan Lerner, Hagop M. Kantarjian and Michael J. Keating

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23993

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      An 11q22 deletion is considered an adverse prognostic factor in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The authors reviewed clinical outcomes of 69 patients with untreated CLL bearing an 11q22 deletion, detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of bone marrow, and found that chemoimmunotherapy for CLL with an 11q22 deletion was associated with high rates of response, survival, and relapse-free survival.

    2. Neuro-Oncology
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      Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis : Prognostic implications of clinical and cerebrospinal fluid features (pages 381–389)

      Jordi Bruna, Laura González, Júlia Miró, Roser Velasco, Miguel Gil, Avelina Tortosa and for the Neuro-Oncology Unit of the Institute of Biomedical Investigation of Bellvitge

      Version of Record online: 24 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24041

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      The objective of this study was to identify prognostic markers related to survival in patients with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis to better select patients who are eligible for intensive treatment. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group score, glucose in cerebrospinal fluid, and the presence of infratentorial neurologic symptoms were associated independently with survival and predicted response to treatment in such patients.

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      Radiosurgical treatment of vestibular schwannomas in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 : Tumor control and hearing preservation (pages 390–398)

      Ji Hoon Phi, Dong Gyu Kim, Hyun-Tai Chung, Joongyub Lee, Sun Ha Paek and Hee-Won Jung

      Version of Record online: 24 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24036

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      Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 provided 5-year tumor control in approximately two-thirds of patients and preserved serviceable hearing in approximately one-third. Radiosurgery should be included in the treatment options, considering its potential for hearing preservation and the low risk of other cranial nerve complications.

    4. Discipline

      Clinical Trials
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      Mental health, treatment preferences, advance care planning, location, and quality of death in advanced cancer patients with dependent children (pages 399–409)

      Matthew E. Nilsson, Paul K. Maciejewski, Baohui Zhang, Alexi A. Wright, Elizabeth D. Trice, Anna C. Muriel, Robert J. Friedlander, Karen M. Fasciano, Susan D. Block and Holly G. Prigerson

      Version of Record online: 26 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24002

      A The objective of this study was to examine quantitatively the differences in end-of-life outcomes based on advanced cancer patients' dependent child status. The results indicated that advanced cancer patients with dependent children were more anxious, less likely to engage in advance care planning, and more likely to have a worse quality of life in their last week of life compared with similar patients who did not have dependent children. Such patients and their spousal caregivers with dependent children represent a particularly distressed group that warrants further clinical attention, research, and support.

    5. Diagnostic Imaging
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      The impact of positron emission tomography (PET) on expected management during cancer treatment : Findings of the National Oncologic PET Registry (pages 410–418)

      Bruce E. Hillner, Barry A. Siegel, Anthony F. Shields, Dawei Liu, Ilana F. Gareen, Lucy Hanna, Sharon Hartson Stine and R. Edward Coleman

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24000

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      The National Oncologic Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Registry (NOPR) report their results on the impact of PET on intended management when it is used for treatment monitoring for all cancer types excluding breast cancer. The results indicated that changes in management were more frequent if the referring physician judged that the post-PET prognosis was worse rather than improved or unchanged (78% vs 40%), and physicians indicated that PET enabled 91% of their patients to avoid future tests.

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Erratum

      Vol. 115, Issue 5, 1133, Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2009

    6. Epidemiology
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      Fifty years of cancer in an American Indian population (pages 419–427)

      Martin C. Mahoney, Puthiery Va, Adrian Stevens, Amy R. Kahn and Arthur M. Michalek

      Version of Record online: 24 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24039

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      This report focuses on cancer patterns within the Seneca Nation of Indians from 1955 through 2004. The study builds on earlier work with Seneca elucidating cancer patterns and cause-specific mortality from 1955 through 1984 and to the authors' knowledge represents the most extensive review conducted to date of a single tribe's cancer burden.

    7. Medical Oncology
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      Phase 2 open-label study of single-agent sorafenib in treating advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in a hepatitis B–endemic Asian population : Presence of lung metastasis predicts poor response (pages 428–436)

      Thomas Yau, Pierre Chan, Kelvin K. Ng, Sin Ho Chok, Tan To Cheung, Sheung Tat Fan and Ronnie T. Poon

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24029

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      Single-agent sorafenib demonstrates good efficacy and acceptable tolerability in treating an advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patient population in a hepatitis B–endemic area. The presence of lung metastasis predicts poor response to sorafenib in advanced HCC patients.

    8. Symptom Control and Palliative Care
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      Symptom distress, interventions, and outcomes of intensive care unit cancer patients referred to a palliative care consult team (pages 437–445)

      Marvin O. Delgado-Guay, Henrique A. Parsons, Zhijun Li, Lynn J. Palmer and Eduardo Bruera

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24017

      The authors characterized distress symptoms, interventions, and outcomes of patients with cancer who were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and referred to a palliative care team (PCT) in a cancer center. Significant numbers of ICU patients had severe physical and emotional distress, multiple interventions were recommended by the PCT, and significant improvements were observed. The findings suggested that the integration of palliative care services may improve the quality of life of these critically ill patients.

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      Do phase 1 patients have greater needs for palliative care compared with other cancer patients? (pages 446–453)

      Esmé Finlay, Hien L. Lu, Hope Henderson, Peter J. O'Dwyer and David J. Casarett

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24025

      Phase 1 oncology trial participants often are excluded from hospice, although, it is not known whether they might benefit from hospice services. The objectives of this study were to define the palliative care needs of these patients and to determine whether their needs are greater than those of other cancer patients.

    10. Translational Research
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      A selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor prevents inflammation-related squamous cell carcinogenesis of the forestomach via duodenogastric reflux in rats (pages 454–464)

      Masaru Oba, Koichi Miwa, Takashi Fujimura, Shinichi Harada, Shozo Sasaki, Katsunobu Oyama, Tetsuo Ohta and Takanori Hattori

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23990

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      A specific cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, meloxicam, significantly reduced a series of inflammatory changes caused by duodenal reflux and inhibited the development of basal cell dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma. A selective COX-2 inhibitor is a possible chemopreventive agent against squamous cell carcinogenesis.

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