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Cancer

Cover image for Cancer

1 November 2009

Volume 115, Issue 21

Pages 4887–5127

  1. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorial
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Original Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Errata
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  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorial
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Original Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Errata
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      Macroscopic assessment of mesorectal excision (pages 4890–4894)

      Warren E. Enker and Gabriel S. Levi

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24655

      Total mesorectal excision (TME) has become the surgical standard of care for rectal cancer. Macroscopic assessment of mesorectal excision (MAME) using digital photography, affords a visual image for grading the completeness of TME (MA-0 to MA-2). Such a grading system can enhance the evaluation of the surgical baseline or platform used in randomized clinical trials, play a role in determining the need for adjuvant therapy in borderline situations (ie, T3N0M0 disease) or determine the care of patients who despite TME, might develop local recurrences.

  3. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorial
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Original Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Errata
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      Vascular endothelial growth factor in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma : A review of literature (pages 4895–4906)

      Ahmed O. Kaseb, Amr Hanbali, Matthew Cotant, Manal M. Hassan, Ira Wollner and Philip A. Philip

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24537

      Hepatocellular carcinoma is a highly vascular tumor. Evidence is presented to support a potential role for vascular endothelial growth factor in screening, monitoring treatment outcome, and predicting prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorial
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Original Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Errata
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
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      Validity assessment of the Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Health Belief scale (pages 4907–4916)

      Mfon Cyrus-David, Jason King, Therese Bevers and Emily Robinson

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24541

      The Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Health Belief scale is valid and reliable tool for assessing the barriers and enhancing factors to accepting breast cancer chemoprevention by women who are at increased risk, underserved, of low socioeconomic status, and ethnic minorities. This would guide the design of tailored interventions to enable better informed decision making.

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      Time to disease recurrence in basal-type breast cancers : Effects of tumor size and lymph node status (pages 4917–4923)

      Rebecca Dent, Wedad M. Hanna, Maureen Trudeau, Ellen Rawlinson, Ping Sun and Steven A. Narod

      Article first published online: 18 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24573

      The authors of this report followed 116 women with basal-like breast cancers for distant disease recurrence and death. Among women with basal cancers, a transient adverse effect of size on disease recurrence was observed; however, after 10 years of follow-up, mortality rates were equal for women with small tumors and women with large tumors.

    3. Gastrointestinal Disease
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      Esophagectomy compared with chemoradiation for early stage esophageal cancer in the elderly (pages 4924–4933)

      Julian A. Abrams, Donna L. Buono, Joshua Strauss, Russell B. McBride, Dawn L. Hershman and Alfred I. Neugut

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24536

      In this population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare study, compared with chemoradiation, esophagectomy was associated with potentially improved survival for elderly patients who had early stage esophageal cancer. The results also indicated that there may be a subset of patients with squamous cell carcinoma for whom chemoradiation is adequate therapy.

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      Autoregulatory effects of serotonin on proliferation and signaling pathways in lung and small intestine neuroendocrine tumor cell lines (pages 4934–4945)

      Ignat Drozdov, Mark Kidd, Bjorn I. Gustafsson, Bernhard Svejda, Richard Joseph, Roswitha Pfragner and Irvin M. Modlin

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24533

      The authors analyzed the proliferative effects of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HT) on 3 human neuroendocrine tumor (NET) (carcinoid) cell lines to determine whether NET cells autoregulate proliferation through 5-HT production and secretion. The results indicated that 5-HT2 receptor subtype-specific antagonists may represent a viable antiproliferative therapeutic strategy for patients with NETs of the lung and small intestine.

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      Invasion associated up-regulation of nuclear factor κB target genes in colorectal cancer (pages 4946–4958)

      David Horst, Jan Budczies, Thomas Brabletz, Thomas Kirchner and Falk Hlubek

      Article first published online: 5 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24564

      By using gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry, the authors of this report demonstrated that nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) target genes were expressed differentially in colorectal cancer (CRC); most NF-κB target genes were up-regulated at the tumor front of invasion, whereas expression diverged between epithelial tumor cells and inflammatory stromal cells. The results indicated that NF-κB signaling may be specifically relevant for CRC invasion, and the authors concluded that the inhibition of NF-κB signaling may be an additional treatment option for patients with sporadic CRC.

    6. Head and Neck Disease
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      Adenosine diphosphate-ribosylation factor 6 is required for epidermal growth factor-induced glioblastoma cell proliferation (pages 4959–4972)

      Ming Li, Jide Wang, Samuel S. M. Ng, Chu-yan Chan, Ming-liang He, Fang Yu, Lihui Lai, Chao Shi, Yangchao Chen, David T. Yew, Hsiang-fu Kung and Marie Chia-mi Lin

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24550

      The results from this study demonstrated that epidermal growth factor-induced glioblastoma cell proliferation depends on adenosine diphosphate-ribosylation factor 6 expression. The results also provide new insights into the design of novel therapeutics for patients with glioblastoma.

  5. Original Article

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorial
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Original Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Errata
    1. Disease Site

      Hematologic Malignancies
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      Trends in survival after diagnosis with hematologic malignancy in adolescence or young adulthood in the United States, 1981-2005 (pages 4973–4979)

      Dianne Pulte, Adam Gondos and Hermann Brenner

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24548

      Survival in adolescents and young adults with hematologic malignancies in 1981-1985 and 2001-2005 was examined. Ten-year survival rates in 1981-1985 versus 2001-2005 were as follows: 80.4% versus 93.4% in Hodgkin lymphoma, 55.6% versus 76.2% in non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 30.5% versus 52.1% in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 15.2% versus 45.1% in acute myeloblastic leukemia, and 0 versus 74.5% in chronic myelocytic leukemia (P < .001 in all cases).

  6. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorial
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Original Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Errata
    1. Disease Site

      Hematologic Malignancies
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      Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma : Clinical characterization and prognosis of Waldeyer ring versus lymph node presentation (pages 4980–4989)

      Shu-Nan Qi, Ye-Xiong Li, Hua Wang, Wei-Hu Wang, Jing Jin, Yong-Wen Song, Shu-Lian Wang, Yue-Ping Liu, Li-Qiang Zhou and Zi-Hao Yu

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24557

      The current data supported the continued inclusion of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of Waldeyer ring as a lymph node group in a large cohort of patients who had DLBCL of Waldeyer ring and of lymph nodes. Patients who had DLBCL of Waldeyer ring had clinical features and prognosis similar to those of patients who had lymph node DLBCL.

    2. Hepatobiliary Disease
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      Rescue chemotherapy using multidrug chronomodulated hepatic arterial infusion for patients with heavily pretreated metastatic colorectal cancer (pages 4990–4999)

      Mohamed Bouchahda, René Adam, Sylvie Giacchetti, Denis Castaing, Catherine Brezault-Bonnet, Dominique Hauteville, Pasquale F. Innominato, Christian Focan, David Machover and Francis Lévi

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24549

      The liver represents the main site of colorectal cancer metastases. Hepatic artery infusion of chronomodulated irinotecan-5–fluorouracil-oxaliplatin offered effective salvage therapy in 29 patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer who previously had failed while receiving ≥3 lines of systemic chemotherapy.

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      A comparison of outcomes from treating hepatocellular carcinoma by hepatic artery embolization in patients younger or older than 70 years (pages 5000–5006)

      Raymond H. Thornton, Anne Covey, Elena N. Petre, Elyn R. Riedel, Mary A. Maluccio, Constantinos T. Sofocleous, Lynn A. Brody, George I. Getrajdman, Michael D'Angelica, Yuman Fong and Karen T. Brown

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24556

      Survival and mortality outcomes after arterial embolization for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma were similar whether patients were aged <70 years or aged ≥70 years. Although older patients with cardiovascular comorbidities were more likely to have a cardiopulmonary complication after embolization, complication severity, length of hospitalization, and need for intensive care unit admission were similar between groups.

    4. Lung Disease
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      Randomized controlled trials of the efficacy of lung cancer screening by sputum cytology revisited : A combined mortality analysis from the Johns Hopkins Lung Project and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Lung Study (pages 5007–5017)

      V. Paul Doria-Rose, Pamela M. Marcus, Eva Szabo, Melvyn S. Tockman, Myron R. Melamed and Philip C. Prorok

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24545

      A reanalysis of data from the Johns Hopkins and Memorial Sloan-Kettering lung screening trials was performed to incorporate lung cancer diagnoses and deaths not reported in previous publications. By using combined data from both trials, the addition of 4-monthly sputum cytology to an annual chest X-ray screening regimen led to an approximately 10% decrease in lung cancer mortality, although this decrease was not statistically significant.

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      Clinical characteristics of 45 patients with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis : Retrospective analysis of 1711 lung cancer cases (pages 5018–5025)

      Xi Yan, Mei Li, Ming Jiang, Li-qun Zou, Feng Luo and Yu Jiang

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24559

      In univariate analysis, the main predisposing factors of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) were clinical stage IV disease, chemotherapy during the month preceding infection, and corticosteroid use. However, in multivariate analysis, only clinical stage IV disease was associated with IPA.

    6. Melanoma
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      Interobserver reproducibility of histologic parameters of melanoma deposits in sentinel lymph nodes : Implications for management of patients with melanoma (pages 5026–5037)

      Rajmohan Murali, Alistair J. Cochran, Martin G. Cook, Joseph D. Hillman, Rooshdiya Z. Karim, Marc Moncrieff, Hans Starz, John F. Thompson and Richard A. Scolyer

      Article first published online: 5 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24298

      Assessment of quantitative histologic parameters of melanoma deposits in sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) was highly reproducible between pathologists, whereas evaluation of the location of tumor deposits within SLNs and assessment of extracapsular spread were less reproducible. These results have important implications for reliability and reproducibility of these parameters in staging, prediction of outcome, and clinical management of melanoma patients.

    7. Discipline

      Diagnostic Imaging
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      18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging in the staging and prognosis of inflammatory breast cancer (pages 5038–5047)

      Jean-Louis Alberini, Florence Lerebours, Myriam Wartski, Emmanuelle Fourme, Elise Le Stanc, E. Gontier, O. Madar, P. Cherel and A. P. Pecking

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24534

      This study assessed fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography staging and prognosis value in patients with suspected inflammatory breast cancer.

    8. Disparities Research
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      Racial differences in trust and regular source of patient care and the implications for prostate cancer screening use (pages 5048–5059)

      William R. Carpenter, Paul A. Godley, Jack A. Clark, James A. Talcott, Timothy Finnegan, Merle Mishel, Jeannette Bensen, Walter Rayford, L. Joseph Su, Elizabeth T. H. Fontham and James L. Mohler

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24539

      The results of the current study indicated that systems factors, including those that differ among different sources of care and those associated with care continuity, may provide tangible targets to address and potentially attenuate disparities in the use of prostate cancer early detection, and may contribute to reduced racial disparities in mortality from prostate cancer.

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      Age-specific physical activity and prostate cancer risk among white men and black men (pages 5060–5070)

      Steven C. Moore, Tricia M. Peters, Jiyoung Ahn, Yikyung Park, Arthur Schatzkin, Demetrius Albanes, Albert Hollenbeck and Michael F. Leitzmann

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24538

      The results from this study indicated that regular physical activity may reduce prostate cancer risk among black men, and activity during young adulthood may yield the greatest benefit. This novel finding needs confirmation in additional studies.

    10. Outcomes Research
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      The impact of primary tumor size, lymph node status, and other prognostic factors on the risk of cancer death (pages 5071–5083)

      L. Leon Chen, Matthew E. Nolan, Melvin J. Silverstein, Martin C. Mihm Jr., Arthur J. Sober, Kenneth K. Tanabe, Barbara L. Smith, Jerry Younger and James S. Michaelson

      Article first published online: 5 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24565

      A new framework is presented that identifies and quantifies the factors that contribute to cancer lethality and combines information on tumor size, lymph node status, and other prognostic factors into estimates of the risk of death. This mathematics drives web-based calculators that accurately estimate the risk of death for each patient.

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      Why cancer at the primary site and in the lymph nodes contributes to the risk of cancer death (pages 5084–5094)

      James S. Michaelson, L. Leon Chen, Melvin J. Silverstein, Justin A. Cheongsiatmoy, Martin C. Mihm Jr, Arthur J. Sober, Kenneth K. Tanabe, Barbara L. Smith and Jerry Younger

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24542

      The lethal contributions of cancer at the primary site and lymph nodes can be explained by a simple, mechanical process of the spread of cancer cells that occurs with definable probabilities per cell. The results from this study indicated that the presence of cancer in the local lymph nodes does not indicate an intrinsic change in these malignancies but, rather, an increased mass of cancer from which distant spread can emerge.

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      How cancer at the primary site and in the lymph nodes contributes to the risk of cancer death (pages 5095–5107)

      James S. Michaelson, L. Leon Chen, Melvin J. Silverstein, Martin C. Mihm Jr, Arthur J. Sober, Kenneth K. Tanabe, Barbara L. Smith and Jerry Younger

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24592

      In this report, the authors have described a mathematical method, the binary-biological model of cancer metastasis, based on the spread of cancer cells, in which the equations capture the relations between tumor size, lymph node status, and cancer lethality.

    13. Psychosocial Oncology
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      Decreased cancer survival in individuals separated at time of diagnosis : Critical period for cancer pathophysiology? (pages 5108–5116)

      Gwen C. Sprehn, Joanna E. Chambers, Andrew J. Saykin, Andre Konski and Peter A. S. Johnstone

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24547

      By using the SEER registry, the authors examined the relationship between marital status at time of diagnosis and survival (5-year and 10-year) among cancer patients. Separated marital status was associated with a significant decrement in cancer survival, even in comparison with other unmarried groups.

    14. Radiation Oncology
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      Accelerated treatment using intensity-modulated radiation therapy plus concurrent capecitabine for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (pages 5117–5125)

      Alyson McIntosh, Klaus D. Hagspiel, Abdullah M. Al-Osaimi, Patrick Northup, Stephen Caldwell, Carl Berg, J. Fritz Angle, Curtis Argo, Geoffrey Weiss and Tyvin A. Rich

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24552

      Treatment options are limited for patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, the combination of directed, conformal radiotherapy with concurrent capecitabine appeared to provide encouraging survival outcomes for patients with Child-Pugh Class A cirrhosis.

  7. Errata

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorial
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Original Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Errata
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      Erratum (page 5126)

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24651

      This article corrects:

      Phase 2 trial of two courses of cyclophosphamide and etoposide for relapsed high-risk osteosarcoma patients1

      Vol. 115, Issue 13, 2980–2987, Article first published online: 18 MAY 2009

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