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Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 116 Issue 20

15 October 2010

Volume 116, Issue 20

Pages 4667–4891

  1. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
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      Cancer drug can damage kidneys (page 4669)

      Carrie Printz

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25664

  2. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
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      Development of curcumin as an epigenetic agent (pages 4670–4676)

      Siqing Fu and Razelle Kurzrock

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25414

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      Clinically achievable plasma concentrations of curcumin in humans are much lower than those in in vitro studies. Thus, novel mechanisms of curcumin for cancer treatment as an epigenetic agent should be delineated to facilitate its future development.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
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      Five-year outcome of patients classified using the American Society for Radiation Oncology consensus statement guidelines for the application of accelerated partial breast irradiation : An analysis of patients treated on the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Registry Trial (pages 4677–4685)

      Simona F. Shaitelman, Frank A. Vicini, Peter Beitsch, Bruce Haffty, Martin Keisch and Maureen Lyden

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25383

      When it was applied to patients who were treated on the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Registry Trial, the American Society for Radiation Oncology consensus statement for the use of accelerated partial breast irradiation did not differentiate a subset of patients with a significantly worse rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence.

    2. Endocrine Disease
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      Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and phosphorylated AKT-serine 473 expression in 132 resected thymomas and thymic carcinomas (pages 4686–4695)

      Paolo A. Zucali, Iacopo Petrini, Elena Lorenzi, Maria Merino, Liang Cao, Luca Di Tommaso, Hye Seung Lee, Matteo Incarbone, Beatriz A. Walter, Matteo Simonelli, Massimo Roncalli, Armando Santoro and Giuseppe Giaccone

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25367

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      The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of 132 patients with thymic epithelial malignancies who underwent surgery at a single institution. The results indicated that insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and phosphorylated AKT-serine 473 are expressed commonly in these tumors and are more frequent in aggressive tumors, suggesting that IGF-1R may play a role in thymic malignancies and may be a potential target for treatment.

    3. Genitourinary Disease
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      Chromosome 9p deletions identify an aggressive phenotype of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (pages 4696–4702)

      Jeffrey La Rochelle, Tobias Klatte, Aditi Dastane, Nagesh Rao, David Seligson, Jonathan Said, Brian Shuch, Nazy Zomorodian, Fairooz Kabbinavar, Arie Belldegrun and Allan J. Pantuck

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25279

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      The results from this study indicated that chromosome 9p deletions are associated with aggressive clear cell renal cell carcinomas, even in otherwise indolent-appearing lesions. These deletions can be detected preoperatively and may help individualize the treatment approach.

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      Underuse of colorectal cancer screening among men screened for prostate cancer : A teachable moment? (pages 4703–4710)

      Sara N. Red, Elisabeth C. Kassan, Randi M. Williams, Sofiya Penek, John Lynch, Chiledum Ahaghotu and Kathryn L. Taylor

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25229

      One half of the participants who attended free prostate cancer screening programs were eligible for but not adherent to colorectal cancer screening. Free prostate cancer screening programs may provide a teachable moment to increase colorectal cancer screening at a time when men are receptive to cancer screening messages.

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      Baseline PSA as a predictor of prostate cancer-specific mortality over the past 2 decades : Duke university experience (pages 4711–4717)

      Ping Tang, Leon Sun, Matthew A. Uhlman, Thomas J. Polascik, Stephen J. Freedland and Judd W. Moul

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25447

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      Baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA) appears to be an accurate and independent predictor of death from prostate cancer. A baseline PSA of ≥4 ng/mL is associated with a higher risk of death from prostate cancer.

    6. Gynecologic Oncology
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      Epithelial membrane protein-2 expression is an early predictor of endometrial cancer development (pages 4718–4726)

      Omar Habeeb, Lee Goodglick, Robert A. Soslow, Rajiv G. Rao, Lynn K. Gordon, Osvaldo Schirripa, Steve Horvath, Jonathan Braun, David B. Seligson and Madhuri Wadehra

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25259

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      Detailed analysis of EMP2 expression in preneoplastic lesions showed that EMP2 positivity was a strong predictor for endometrial cancer (EC) development. As EMP2 expression has already been shown to correlate with aggressive EC, these results confirm that EMP2 is a novel biomarker for future hyperplasia progression to EC development.

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      Ohio Appalachian women's perceptions of the cost of cervical cancer screening (pages 4727–4734)

      Ann Scheck McAlearney, Paula H. Song, Dale A. Rhoda, Cathy Tatum, Stanley Lemeshow, Mack Ruffin, J. Phil Harrop and Electra D. Paskett

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25491

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      The current study explored the expectations of women in Appalachian Ohio regarding Papanicolaou (Pap) test costs and perceptions of cost as a barrier to screening. Women who noted cost as a barrier were twice as likely to not receive a test within screening guidelines as those who did not perceive a cost barrier, but >80% of women reported not knowing the cost of a Pap test.

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      A double-blind, randomized trial of pyridoxine versus placebo for the prevention of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin-related hand-foot syndrome in gynecologic oncology patients (pages 4735–4743)

      Vivian von Gruenigen, Heidi Frasure, Nancy Fusco, Robert DeBernardo, Elisa Eldermire, Susan Eaton and Steven Waggoner

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25262

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      In patients who received pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, there was no difference in the incidence of hand-foot syndrome (HFS) in those who were assigned randomly to receive pyridoxine versus placebo. Pyridoxine at the dose level in the current study is not indicated for the prevention of HFS during chemotherapy.

    9. Head and Neck Disease
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      Improved survival is associated with treatment at high-volume teaching facilities for patients with advanced stage laryngeal cancer (pages 4744–4752)

      Amy Y. Chen, Stacey Fedewa, Alex Pavluck and Elizabeth M. Ward

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25364

      In this study, the authors observed that receiving treatment at high-volume teaching/research facilities was associated with improved survival. Undergoing total laryngectomy also was associated with improved survival.

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      Genetic variants in selected pre-microRNA genes and the risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (pages 4753–4760)

      Zhensheng Liu, Guojun Li, Sheng Wei, Jiangong Niu, Adel. K. El-Naggar, Erich M. Sturgis and Qingyi Wei

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25323

      Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNAs (miRNAs) may alter the processing, transcription, and expression of miRNAs and, thus, may contribute to cancer development. The authors of this report hypothesized that common polymorphisms in pre-miRNAs are associated individually and (more likely) collectively with the risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). The results indicated that the combined risk genotypes of 4 common SNPs in pre-miRNAs were associated significantly with a moderately increased risk of SCCHN.

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      Efficacy and toxicity of reirradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent or second primary head and neck cancer (pages 4761–4768)

      David J. Sher, Robert I. Haddad, Charles M. Norris Jr, Marshall R. Posner, Lori J. Wirth, Laura A. Goguen, Donald Annino, Tracy Balboni, Aaron Allen and Roy B. Tishler

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25305

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      Optimal management of recurrent head and neck cancer involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The results of the current study showed that reirradiation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy is feasible and associated with high locoregional control rates but also is associated with significant grade 3 or higher acute and late toxicity.

    12. Hematologic Malignancies
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      Reactivation of hepatitis B virus after rituximab-containing treatment in patients with CD20-positive B-cell lymphoma (pages 4769–4776)

      Kosei Matsue, Shun-Ichi Kimura, Yoko Takanashi, Kan-Ichi Iwama, Hideaki Fujiwara, Masayuki Yamakura and Masami Takeuchi

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25253

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      This paper describes the incidence and risk factors for HBV reactivation after the use of rituximab in hepatitis B surface antigen-negative patients with CD20-positive B-cell lymphomas. The authors found that patients positive for antibody to hepatitis B core antigen, especially those who were negative for antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen, were at high risk for developing HBV reactivation after treatment with rituximab-containing therapy.

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      Age at diagnosis and the utility of prognostic testing in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (pages 4777–4787)

      Tait D. Shanafelt, Kari G. Rabe, Neil E. Kay, Clive S. Zent, Diane F. Jelinek, Megan S. Reinalda, Susan M. Schwager, Debbie A. Bowen, Susan L. Slager, Curtis A. Hanson and Timothy G. Call

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25292

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      Among patients aged <75 years, the simple combinations of stage and IGHV mutation status or stage and fluorescent in situ hybridization identifies those with excess risk of death relative to the age-matched population. Although useful for predicting time to first treatment independent of stage for patients of all ages, prognostic testing had little utility for predicting overall survival independent of stage among patients aged ≥75 years.

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      Hairy cell leukemia : Evaluation of the long-term outcome in 121 patients (pages 4788–4792)

      Pier Luigi Zinzani, Cinzia Pellegrini, Vittorio Stefoni, Enrico Derenzini, Letizia Gandolfi, Alessandro Broccoli, Lisa Argnani, Federica Quirini, Stefano Pileri and Michele Baccarani

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25243

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      This study confirms the high risk of retreatment of hairy cell leukemia patients and the need to maximize primary response, including the possibility of combining purine analogues with rituximab or other monoclonal antibodies.

    15. Lung Disease
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      Healthcare use after screening for lung cancer (pages 4793–4799)

      Margaret M. Byrne, Tulay Koru-Sengul, Wei Zhao, Joel L. Weissfeld and Mark S. Roberts

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25466

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      Healthcare use is reported to increase in the 6 months after lung cancer screening. This is true for individuals with a negative screening result as well as for those with a false-positive result.

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      Up-regulation of interleukin-17 expression by human papillomavirus type 16 E6 in nonsmall cell lung cancer (pages 4800–4809)

      Yih-Hsin Chang, Chen-Wei Yu, Li-Chuan Lai, Chang-Hui Tsao, Kuo-Ting Ho, Shun-Chun Yang, Huei Lee, Ya-Wen Cheng, Tzu-Chin Wu and Ming-Yuh Shiau

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25224

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      Interleukin (IL)-17 expression is significantly associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in nonsmall cell lung cancer tissues. This study suggests that HPV infection-induced IL-17 level can stimulate Mcl-1 expression through the PI3K pathway and promote lung tumor cell progression through a p53- and IL-6–independent pathway.

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      Lung cancer histology, stage, treatment, and survival in American Indians and Alaska Natives and whites (pages 4810–4816)

      Megan Dann Fesinmeyer, Bernardo Goulart, David K. Blough, Dedra Buchwald and Scott D. Ramsey

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25410

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      Lung cancer histology was found to be associated with tumor characteristics, treatment, and survival. In this analysis of lung cancer cases in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, American Indians and Alaska Natives were found to have different lung cancer histology distribution, a reduced likelihood of receiving surgery, and an increased risk of death compared with whites.

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      Predictors of anticoagulation in hospice patients with lung cancer (pages 4817–4824)

      Holly M. Holmes, Kevin T. Bain, Ali Zalpour, Ruili Luo, Eduardo Bruera and James S. Goodwin

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25284

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      Guidelines recommend lifelong anticoagulation in patients with cancer and thromboembolism, but the benefits and risks of anticoagulation in an end-of-life population are unclear. In this study, 1 of every 11 hospice patients with lung cancer was prescribed an anticoagulant, most commonly warfarin, and patients who were older and had a longer stay in hospice were more likely to be prescribed warfarin compared with low molecular weight heparin.

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      Peak oxygen consumption and long-term all-cause mortality in nonsmall cell lung cancer (pages 4825–4832)

      Lee W. Jones, Dorothy Watson, James E. Herndon II, Neil D. Eves, Benjamin E. Haithcock, Gregory Loewen and Leslie Kohman

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25396

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      Identifying strong markers of prognosis is critical to optimize treatment and survival outcomes in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, the authors observed that peak oxygen consumption is a strong independent predictor of survival in NSCLC that may complement traditional markers of prognosis.

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      Dose escalation of gemcitabine concomitant with radiation and cisplatin for nonsmall cell lung cancer : A phase 1-2 study (pages 4833–4839)

      Felix Momm, Markus Kaden, Ian Tannock, Martin Schumacher, Joachim Hasse and Michael Henke

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25366

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      Gemcitabine at doses up to 550 mg/m2 weekly can be given simultaneously with radiation and cisplatin to patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer. Radical resection thereafter is feasible. The impact of this aggressive therapy should be evaluated further.

    21. Discipline

      Disparities Research
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      Regional variation in cancer-directed surgery and mortality among women with epithelial ovarian cancer in the medicare population (pages 4840–4848)

      Kathleen M. Fairfield, F. Lee Lucas, Craig C. Earle, Laurie Small, Edward L. Trimble and Joan L. Warren

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25242

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      The authors investigated regional variation in mortality among Medicare recipients with ovarian cancer, and access to cancer-directed surgery explained some of this variation. The results indicated that improving access to high-quality cancer surgery for ovarian cancer may improve outcomes, particularly for minorities and for older women.

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      Characteristics of patients with stage III colon adenocarcinoma who fail to receive guideline-recommended treatment (pages 4849–4856)

      Marcy Winget, Shakhawat Hossain, Yutaka Yasui and Andrew Scarfe

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25250

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      The authors investigated the proportion of patients with stage III colon adenocarcinoma who did not receive treatment according to evidence-based guidelines in Alberta, Canada and observed that it was appreciable. The results indicated that association between this failure and patient age, geography, and income is concerning.

    23. Epidemiology
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      Balancing the harms and benefits of early detection of prostate cancer (pages 4857–4865)

      Pim J. van Leeuwen, David Connolly, Teuvo L. J. Tammela, Anssi Auvinen, Ries Kranse, Monique J. Roobol, Fritz H. Schroder and Anna Gavin

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25474

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      Screening lowers prostate cancer mortality. However, additional individual risk stratifications are needed. This article presents a stratified analysis according to serum PSA on study entry to determine whether mortality reduction is limited to men with prostate-specific antigen in a particular range.

    24. Outcomes Research
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      Breastfeeding in survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma treated with chest radiotherapy (pages 4866–4871)

      Laura McCullough, Andrea Ng, Julie Najita, Abbe Janov, Tara Henderson, Peter Mauch and Lisa Diller

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25442

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      Analysis of self-reported breastfeeding success in women who were long-term survivors after chest radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma was preformed. The majority of Hodgkin lymphoma survivors who were treated with chest radiotherapy were able to breastfeed, although at a slightly decreased frequency compared with their sibling controls.

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      Data and trends in cancer screening in the United States : Results from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey (pages 4872–4881)

      Judith Swan, Nancy Breen, Barry I. Graubard, Timothy S. McNeel, Donald Blackman, Florence K. Tangka and Rachel Ballard-Barbash

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25215

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      On examination of cancer screening in the 2005 National Health Interview Survey, large gaps in use remain among population groups with differing levels of education, income, usual source of care, health insurance, and recent physician contact. Results identify specific populations that may benefit from efforts to overcome barriers to screening.

    26. Pediatric Oncology
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      Trends in incidence and survival of pediatric and adolescent patients with germ cell tumors in the United States, 1975 to 2006 (pages 4882–4891)

      Jenny N. Poynter, James F. Amatruda and Julie A. Ross

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25454

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      No significant differences in incidence rates by race or ethnicity were observed in children diagnosed between birth and 9 years of age; however, statistically significant differences were observed in adolescents diagnosed between ages 10 and 19 years. This analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data suggested that the incidence of germ cell tumors may be increasing in young girls (birth to 9 years of age) in addition to the well-documented increase in adolescent males (ages 10-19 years).

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