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Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 116 Issue 21

1 November 2010

Volume 116, Issue 21

Pages 4893–5112

  1. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
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      Addressing survivorship in diverse populations (page 4894)

      Carrie Printz

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25698

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      Experts find links between diabetes and cancer (page 4895)

      Carrie Printz

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25699

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      Digital camera detects oral cancer cells (page 4895)

      Carrie Printz

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25700

  2. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
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      Questions regarding frontline therapy of acute myeloid leukemia (pages 4896–4901)

      Hagop Kantarjian and Susan O'Brien

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25281

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      The results from multiple investigations using different induction approaches suggest that better regimens are available and should be investigated further in the context of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) heterogeneity and emerging prognostic knowledge concerning cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities. Today, based on existing data, evaluating bone marrow on Days 10 to 14 for residual AML and reacting to the bone marrow findings may be a common practice, but is not validated by objective data.

  3. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
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      BRAF, a target in melanoma : Implications for solid tumor drug development (pages 4902–4913)

      Keith T. Flaherty and Grant McArthur

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25261

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      Mutation of v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF), a serine/threonine kinase, has been validated as a therapeutic target in patients with melanoma. Defining the value of BRAF inhibition in other solid tumors that harbor BRAF is the current priority.

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      Head and neck cancer : Proteomic advances and biomarker achievements (pages 4914–4925)

      Taia Maria Berto Rezende, Mirna de Souza Freire and Octávio Luiz Franco

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25245

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      This review emphasizes the importance of proteomic tools in understanding head and neck cancer, highlighting proteomic tools used in cancer studies and new findings in head and neck cancer diagnostic and physiological biomarkers.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
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      African ancestry and higher prevalence of triple-negative breast cancer : Findings from an international study (pages 4926–4932)

      Azadeh Stark, Celina G. Kleer, Iman Martin, Baffour Awuah, Anthony Nsiah-Asare, Valerie Takyi, Maria Braman, Solomon E. Quayson, Richard Zarbo, Max Wicha and Lisa Newman

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25276

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      Estrogen receptor-negative and triple-negative breast cancer is more common in African American compared with white/European American women. This international study involving Ghana suggests that African ancestry may predispose to high-risk breast tumors.

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      Higher parity and shorter breastfeeding duration : Association with triple-negative phenotype of breast cancer (pages 4933–4943)

      Shivani S. Shinde, Michele R. Forman, Henry M. Kuerer, Kai Yan, Florentia Peintinger, Kelly K. Hunt, Gabriel N. Hortobagyi, Lajos Pusztai and W. Fraser Symmans

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25443

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      Findings from a consecutive case series of risk factors and tumor phenotype in 2473 breast cancer patients supported an a priori hypothesis that triple-negative phenotype would be associated with shorter duration of breastfeeding and higher parity, theoretically related to progenitor cell retention within breast tissues.

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      Evaluation of a breast cancer risk prediction model expanded to include category of prior benign breast disease lesion (pages 4944–4953)

      Rulla M. Tamimi, Bernard Rosner and Graham A. Colditz

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25386

      Given the substantial heterogeneity in breast cancer risk dependent on the type of benign lesion, the authors evaluated whether incorporating more detail on the type of histologic lesion improved the discriminatory power of the Rosner-Colditz breast cancer risk prediction model in the Nurses' Health Study. The results indicated that including the histologic classification of benign breast lesion significantly improved the risk prediction model.

    4. Gastrointestinal Disease
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      The prognostic value of c-Kit, K-ras codon 12, and p53 codon 72 mutations in Egyptian patients with stage II colorectal cancer (pages 4954–4964)

      Mostafa M. El-Serafi, Abeer A. Bahnassy, Nasr M. Ali, Salem M. Eid, Mahmoud M. Kamel, Nayera A. Abdel-Hamid and Abdel-Rahman N. Zekri

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25417

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      In this study, c-Kit overexpression, mutations in codons 12 and 13 of the Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (K-ras) gene, and mutations in codon 72 of the tumor protein 53 (p53) gene proved to be independent prognostic factors in patients with stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) and should be added to standard prognostic factors for better evaluation of patients. In addition, the current results indicated that Egyptian patients with stage II CRC have a unique mutational pattern of p53 that differs from the pattern reported among patients in the United States and Western countries.

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      Microsatellite instability among individuals of Hispanic origin with colorectal cancer (pages 4965–4972)

      Samir Gupta, Raheela Ashfaq, Payal Kapur, Bianca B. Afonso, Thuy-Phuong T. Nguyen, Faryal Ansari, C. Richard Boland, Ajay Goel and Don C. Rockey

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25486

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      Among individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC), microsatellite instability (MSI) status may have implications for prognosis, therapy, and counseling, but to the authors' knowledge, MSI prevalence has not been clearly defined among individuals of Hispanic origin with CRC. In the current study, the authors report that the prevalence of MSI CRC among Hispanic individuals may be similar to that of other races and ethnicities, but clinicopathological characteristics, including age at diagnosis and type of abnormal mismatch repair protein expression, suggest that sporadic MSI CRC may be less common in individuals of Hispanic origin.

    6. Gynecologic Oncology
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      Combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin is highly active in women with endometrial carcinoma : Results of a prospective phase 2 trial (pages 4973–4979)

      Jubilee Brown, Judith A. Smith, Lois M. Ramondetta, Anil K. Sood, Pedro T. Ramirez, Robert L. Coleman, Charles F. Levenback, Mark F. Munsell, Maria Jung and Judith K. Wolf

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25498

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      The combination chemotherapy regimen of gemcitabine and cisplatin appears to be active in women with recurrent or advanced endometrial cancer. This therapy results in a 50% objective response rate and manageable toxicity.

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      Dasatinib induces autophagic cell death in human ovarian cancer (pages 4980–4990)

      Xiao-Feng Le, Weiqun Mao, Zhen Lu, Bing Z. Carter and Robert C. Bast Jr

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25426

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      Dasatinib induces autophagic cell death in ovarian cancer that partially depends on beclin 1, AKT, and Bcl-2. These results may have implications for clinical use of dasatinib.

    8. Hematologic Malignancies
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      Current patient management of chronic myeloid leukemia in Latin America : A study by the Latin American Leukemia Net (LALNET) (pages 4991–5000)

      Jorge Cortes, Carmino De Souza, Manuel Ayala-Sanchez, Israel Bendit, Carlos Best-Aguilera, Alicia Enrico, Nelson Hamerschlak, Katia Pagnano, Ricardo Pasquini and Luis Meillon

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25273

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      A survey of 435 physicians in 16 Latin American countries revealed that in general most follow current recommendations for the use of imatinib to treat patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, significant variability is evident regarding the management of CML patients, determined in great part by availability of resources.

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      Pretransplantation [18-F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan predicts outcome in patients with recurrent Hodgkin lymphoma or aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma undergoing reduced-intensity conditioning followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation (pages 5001–5011)

      Anna Dodero, Roberto Crocchiolo, Francesca Patriarca, Rosalba Miceli, Luca Castagna, Fabio Ciceri, Stefania Bramanti, Niccolo Frungillo, Raffaella Milani, Flavio Crippa, Federico Fallanca, Emanuela Englaro and Paolo Corradini

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25357

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      Disease assessment on an [18-F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) scan before allogeneic stem cell transplantation was capable of predicting long-term survival in patients with recurrent and chemosensitive Hodgkin lymphoma or aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma, because the patients who had negative PET scans were at lower risk of recurrence and had better progression-free and overall survival than the patients who had positive PET scans. The predictive value of PET was independent of graft-versus-host disease and the graft-versus-lymphoma effect.

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      Adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia who achieve complete remission after 1 or 2 cycles of induction have a similar prognosis : A report on 1980 patients registered to 6 studies conducted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (pages 5012–5021)

      Jacob M. Rowe, Haesook T. Kim, Peter A. Cassileth, Hillard M. Lazarus, Mark R. Litzow, Peter H. Wiernik and Martin S. Tallman

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25263

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      For patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia, the presence of residual leukemia in bone marrow 10 to 14 days after the start of induction therapy did not predict a worse prognosis if a second, similar cycle of induction therapy was administered and if complete remission was achieved.

    11. Hepatobiliary Disease
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      Phase 1-2 trial of PTK787/ZK222584 combined with intravenous doxorubicin for treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma : Implication for antiangiogenic approach to hepatocellular carcinoma (pages 5022–5029)

      Thomas Yau, Pierre Chan, Roberta Pang, Kelvin Ng, S. T. Fan and Ronnie T. Poon

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25372

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      The combination of PTK787 and doxorubicin shows encouraging activity in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Thus, the idea of combining an antiangiogenic agent together with chemotherapy warrants further evaluation in future clinical trials.

    12. Lung Disease
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      High rates of tumor growth and disease progression detected on serial pretreatment fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography scans in radical radiotherapy candidates with nonsmall cell lung cancer (pages 5030–5037)

      Sarah Everitt, Alan Herschtal, Jason Callahan, Nikki Plumridge, David Ball, Tomas Kron, Michal Schneider-Kolsky, David Binns, Rodney J. Hicks and Michael MacManus

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25392

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      The authors studied growth and progression of untreated nonsmall cell lung cancer by comparing diagnostic and radiotherapy (RT) planning fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography scans before proposed radical chemo-RT. Interscan disease progression occurred in 39% of patients, 28% were unsuitable for radical therapy after the second PET scan, and the estimated doubling time of FDG avid tumor was only 66 days.

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      Factors associated with the development of brain metastases : Analysis of 975 patients with early stage nonsmall cell lung cancer (pages 5038–5046)

      Jessica L. Hubbs, Jessamy A. Boyd, Donna Hollis, Junzo P. Chino, Mert Saynak and Chris R. Kelsey

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25254

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      The actuarial risk of developing brain metastases in early stage NSCLC is 10%. Risk factors include younger age, larger tumor size, lymphovascular space invasion, and hilar lymph node involvement.

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      Limited resection followed by intraoperative seed implantation is comparable to stereotactic body radiotherapy for solitary lung cancer (pages 5047–5053)

      Bhupesh Parashar, Priti Patel, Stefano Monni, Prabhsimranjot Singh, Nikki Sood, Samuel Trichter, Albert Sabbas, A. Gabriella Wernicke, Dattatreyudu Nori and K. S. Clifford Chao

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25441

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      The current results demonstrated comparable efficacy in outcome and toxicity between surgical resection with radioactive seed implantation and stereotactic body radiotherapy for the treatment of single malignant lung nodules in patients who were not candidates for lobectomy/pneumonectomy.

    15. Discipline

      Epidemiology
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      Obesity adversely affects survival in pancreatic cancer patients (pages 5054–5062)

      Robert R. McWilliams, Martha E. Matsumoto, Patrick A. Burch, George P. Kim, Thorvardur R. Halfdanarson, Mariza de Andrade, Kaye Reid-Lombardo and William R. Bamlet

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25465

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      Obesity as measured by increased body mass index (BMI) is associated with decreased survival in those diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, after adjusting for known confounders. BMI should be considered as a covariate in prospective studies of pancreatic cancer.

    16. Pediatric Oncology
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      Childhood cancer mortality in America, Asia, and Oceania, 1970 through 2007 (pages 5063–5074)

      Liliane Chatenoud, Paola Bertuccio, Cristina Bosetti, Fabio Levi, Eva Negri and Carlo La Vecchia

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25406

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      From 1970 to 2005, mortality rates for all childhood cancers were halved in North America and in Japan, reaching rates of 3 per 100,000 boys and 2 per 100,000 girls. However, in most Latin American countries and in other middle-income countries during 2005 through 2007, the rates were approximately 5 per 100,000 boys and 4 per 100,000 girls, which were similar to the rates reported in most developed countries during the 1980s. The smaller and later decline in childhood cancer mortality in several middle-income countries reflected delays in the adoption of newer integrated therapies in those countries.

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      The tyrosine kinase c-Abl promotes proliferation and is expressed in atypical teratoid and malignant rhabdoid tumors (pages 5075–5081)

      Björn Koos, Astrid Jeibmann, Henning Lünenbürger, Sonja Mertsch, Nina N. Nupponen, Annariikka Roselli, Ivo Leuschner, Werner Paulus, Michael C. Frühwald and Martin Hasselblatt

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25420

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      The current results indicated that c-Abl, a target of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (eg, imatinib), is highly expressed and involved in the biology of malignant rhabdoid tumors. This finding provides a first rationale for targeting c-Abl in malignant rhabdoid tumors.

    18. Radiation Oncology
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      Change in fibroblast growth factor 2 expression as an early phase radiotherapy-responsive marker in sequential biopsy samples from patients with cervical cancer during fractionated radiotherapy (pages 5082–5092)

      Miyako Nakawatari, Mayumi Iwakawa, Tatsuya Ohno, Shingo Kato, Etsuko Nakamura, Yu Ohkubo, Tomoaki Tamaki and Takashi Imai

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25433

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      The results from this study indicated that changes in immunohistologic fibroblast growth factor 2 expression in cervical cancer cells obtained from biopsies before and during radiotherapy can be used as a marker to monitor the effectiveness of radiotherapy.

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      Sequential magnetic resonance imaging of cervical cancer : The predictive value of absolute tumor volume and regression ratio measured before, during, and after radiation therapy (pages 5093–5101)

      Jian Z. Wang, Nina A. Mayr, Dongqing Zhang, Kaile Li, John C. Grecula, Joseph F. Montebello, Simon S. Lo and William T. C. Yuh

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25260

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      In this study, the authors investigated the efficacy of outcome prediction using serial magnetic resonance imaging examinations to measure both tumor volumes and regression ratios before, during, and after radiotherapy and developed algorithms to identify early those patients with cervical cancer who were at risk of treatment failure.

    20. Symptom Control and Palliative Care
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      Methylphenidate for fatigue in ambulatory men with prostate cancer (pages 5102–5110)

      Andrew J. Roth, Christian Nelson, Barry Rosenfeld, Howard Scher, Susan Slovin, Michael Morris, Noelle O'Shea, Gabrielle Arauz and William Breitbart

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25424

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      This is the first randomized placebo-controlled trial of a psychostimulant for fatigue in a prostate cancer population. Data from this study, which should be considered preliminary, suggest that methylphenidate is effective in treating fatigue in men with prostate cancer; however, oncologists need to monitor these men regularly for possible pulse and blood pressure elevations.

  5. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
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      Decreased cancer survival in individuals separated at time of diagnosis: Critical period for cancer pathophysiology? (page 5111)

      Laura J. Hanisch, James C. Coyne and Steven C. Palmer

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25238

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