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Cancer

Cover image for Cancer

15 March 2010

Volume 116, Issue 6

Pages 1393–1616

  1. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Editorials
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Original Article
    8. Original Articles
    9. Correspondence
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  2. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Editorials
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Original Article
    8. Original Articles
    9. Correspondence
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      Guide for investigators conducting international cancer research involving developing nations (pages 1396–1399)

      Iman K. Martin, Baffour Awuah and Lisa A. Newman

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24860

      International studies of cancer will increasingly involve collaboration with underdeveloped countries. These research partnerships will also strengthen communication and understanding between diverse populations.

  3. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Editorials
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Original Article
    8. Original Articles
    9. Correspondence
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      The heterogeneity of epithelial ovarian cancer : Getting it right (pages 1400–1402)

      David M. Gershenson

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24926

      Epithelial ovarian cancer is heterogeneous and comprises 4 major rare subtypes—mucinous, clear cell, low-grade serous, and endometrioid—all distinct from the more common high-grade serous carcinoma. Women with uncommon histotypes should be triaged to separate clinical trials.

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      Refining the criteria for sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with thinner melanoma : A roadmap for the future (pages 1403–1405)

      Jane L. Messina and Vernon K. Sondak

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24908

      Numerous studies validate the standard practice of sentinel lymph node biopsy for patients with melanoma, and recent results from the Sunbelt Melanoma Trial highlight its important prognostic role in patients with thinner (1.0 mm–2.0 mm) melanomas. Future studies including large, unselected groups of patients with thin melanoma undergoing thorough pathologic microstaging of both the primary and the sentinel node are necessary to address remaining questions and aid in refining selection criteria for this procedure.

  4. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Editorials
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Original Article
    8. Original Articles
    9. Correspondence
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      Pathogenesis of osteoblastic bone metastases from prostate cancer (pages 1406–1418)

      Toni Ibrahim, Emanuela Flamini, Laura Mercatali, Emanuele Sacanna, Patrizia Serra and Dino Amadori

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24896

      Prostate cancer cells metastasize to bone, undergoing an epithelial-mesenchymal transition to disseminate and acquire a bone-like phenotype to grow in bone tissue. Metastasization is the result of dynamic crosstalk between metastatic cancer cells, and cellular components of the bone marrow microenvironment and bone matrix (osteoblasts and osteoclasts).

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Erratum: Pathogenesis of osteoblastic bone metastases from prostate cancer

      Vol. 116, Issue 10, 2503, Article first published online: 2 MAR 2010

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      Optimizing therapy for patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase (pages 1419–1430)

      Hagop M. Kantarjian, Jorge Cortes, Paul La Rosée and Andreas Hochhaus

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24928

      Although the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) has improved significantly since the advent of imatinib and, more recently, the second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors dasatinib and nilotinib, there remains an urgent need to optimize therapy for individual patients. The objectives of this review article are to offer physicians a comprehensive review of the current literature and provide data supporting various treatment options for patients with CML throughout the course of imatinib therapy and beyond.

  5. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Editorials
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Original Article
    8. Original Articles
    9. Correspondence
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
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      Immunohistochemical surrogate markers of breast cancer molecular classes predicts response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy : A single institutional experience with 359 cases (pages 1431–1439)

      Rohit Bhargava, Sushil Beriwal, David J. Dabbs, Umut Ozbek, Atilla Soran, Ronald R. Johnson, Adam M. Brufsky, Barry C. Lembersky and Gretchen M. Ahrendt

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24876

      Immunohistochemical criteria for corresponding molecular classes of breast cancer predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. These criteria can be reliably applied in routine practice for prognostic/predictive information.

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Erratum: Immunohistochemical Surrogate Markers of Breast Cancer Molecular Classes Predicts Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

      Vol. 117, Issue 10, 2238, Article first published online: 10 NOV 2010

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      A phase 2 study of a fixed combination of uracil and ftorafur (UFT) and leucovorin given orally in a 3-times-daily regimen to treat patients with recurrent metastatic breast cancer (pages 1440–1445)

      Gabriel N. Hortobagyi, William Heim, Laura Hutchins, Edgardo Rivera, Bernard Mason, Daniel J. Booser and Jeffrey Kirshner

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24900

      The combination of uracil and ftorafur (UFT) and leucovorin administered orally in a 3-times-daily regimen is reported to have modest activity in patients with metastatic breast cancer who had been previously treated with anthracyclines and/or taxanes. Grade 3 toxicities were manageable.

    3. Gastrointestinal Disease
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      Weekly docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil as initial therapy for patients with advanced gastric and esophageal cancer (pages 1446–1453)

      Michael J. Overman, Syed M. Kazmi, Jagriti Jhamb, E Lin, James C. Yao, James L. Abbruzzese, Linus Ho, Jaffer Ajani and Alexandria Phan

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24925

      In patients with advanced gastroesophageal cancer who were not candidates for therapy with every-3-week docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-flurouracil (DCF), a weekly formulation of DCF demonstrated modest activity with minimal hematologic toxicity. Further schedule optimization for these 3 active agents is recommended.

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      Ability of integrated positron emission and computed tomography to detect significant colonic pathology : The experience of a tertiary cancer center (pages 1454–1461)

      Brian R. Weston, Revathy B. Iyer, Wei Qiao, Jeffrey H. Lee, Robert S. Bresalier and William A. Ross

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24885

      A negative positron emission tomography and computed axial tomography does not rule out colon cancer, colonic lymphoma, advanced adenomas, or inflammatory conditions in the colon. Standardized uptake value readings had no relation to lesion size and were not useful in distinguishing true-positive exams from false-positive exams.

    5. Gynecologic Oncology
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      Mucinous but not clear cell histology is associated with inferior survival in patients with advanced stage ovarian carcinoma treated with platinum-paclitaxel chemotherapy (pages 1462–1468)

      Aristotle Bamias, Theodora Psaltopoulou, Maria Sotiropoulou, Dimitrios Haidopoulos, Evangelos Lianos, Evangelos Bournakis, Christos Papadimitriou, Alexandros Rodolakis, George Vlahos and Meletius A. Dimopoulos

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24915

      Mucinous but not clear cell histology is associated with significantly worse prognosis in advanced ovarian cancer treated with combination platinum/paclitaxel. Different therapeutic strategies should be studied in this entity.

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      Pelvic lymph node F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose uptake as a prognostic biomarker in newly diagnosed patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (pages 1469–1475)

      Elizabeth A. Kidd, Barry A. Siegel, Farrokh Dehdashti and Perry W. Grigsby

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24972

      In the current study, the authors evaluated the prognostic significance of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) of pelvic lymph nodes in patients with cervical cancer. The SUV in pelvic lymph nodes was found to be a prognostic biomarker, predicting treatment response, risk of pelvic disease recurrence, and disease-specific survival.

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      Ten-year follow-up of a phase 2 study of dose-intense paclitaxel with cisplatin and cyclophosphamide as initial therapy for poor-prognosis, advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer (pages 1476–1484)

      Gisele A. Sarosy, Mahrukh M. Hussain, Michael V. Seiden, Arlan F. Fuller, Najmosama Nikrui, Annekathryn Goodman, Lori Minasian, Eddie Reed, Seth M. Steinberg and Elise C. Kohn

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24861

      Dose-intense paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, and cisplatin with flexible filgrastim dosing yielded a high surgical response rate and encouraging overall survival in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. These data and those recently reported by the Japanese Oncology Group suggest that further study of dose-dense or dose-intense regimens may be warranted.

    8. Hematologic Malignancies
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      Azacitidine for the treatment of lower risk myelodysplastic syndromes : A retrospective study of 74 patients enrolled in an Italian named patient program (pages 1485–1494)

      Pellegrino Musto, Luca Maurillo, Alessandra Spagnoli, Antonella Gozzini, Flavia Rivellini, Monia Lunghi, Oreste Villani, Maria Antonietta Aloe-Spiriti, Adriano Venditti and Valeria Santini

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24894

      In this retrospective study, 74 patients with lower risk myelodysplastic syndromes received azacitidine in a named patient program. Overall, the response rate was 45.9%, and a survival benefit was observed in responding patients, indicating that azacitidine may be a feasible and effective therapeutic option for these patients.

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      Phase 2 study of intrathecal, long-acting liposomal cytarabine in the prophylaxis of lymphomatous meningitis in human immunodeficiency virus-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma (pages 1495–1501)

      Michele Spina, Emanuela Chimienti, Ferdinando Martellotta, Emanuela Vaccher, Massimiliano Berretta, Ernesto Zanet, Arben Lleshi, Vincenzo Canzonieri, Pietro Bulian and Umberto Tirelli

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24922

      Patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and human immunodeficiency virus infection benefit from the use of liposomal cytarabine (DepoCyte) as prophylaxis against meningeal disease recurrence or progression.

    10. Hepatobiliary Disease
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      Predictors of a true complete response among disappearing liver metastases from colorectal cancer after chemotherapy (pages 1502–1509)

      Rebecca C. Auer, Rebekah R. White, Nancy E. Kemeny, Lawrence H. Schwartz, Jinru Shia, Leslie H. Blumgart, Ronald P. DeMatteo, Yuman Fong, William R. Jarnagin and Michael I. D'Angelica

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24912

      Approximately 66% of patients who have disappearing liver metastases have a true complete response according to assessment by resection or radiologic follow-up. Predictive factors, such as the use of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, inability to observe the metastasis on magnetic resonance imaging, and normalization of the serum carcinoembryonic antigen level, help to stratify patients who are likely to harbor residual disease.

    11. Lung Disease
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      Proposed adjustments to pathologic staging of epithelial malignant pleural mesothelioma based on analysis of 354 cases (pages 1510–1517)

      William G. Richards, John J. Godleski, Beow Y. Yeap, Joseph M. Corson, Lucian R. Chirieac, Lambros Zellos, Aneil Mujoomdar, Michael T. Jaklitsch, Raphael Bueno and David J. Sugarbaker

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24886

      Existing staging systems for diffuse malignant pleural mesothelioma do not provide accurate survival stratification for patients undergoing primary surgery. Proposed adjustments to pathologic TNM staging criteria improve outcome stratification of patients with epithelial tumor histology who receive definitive surgical therapy by extrapleural pneumonectomy.

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Erratum: Proposed adjustments to pathologic staging of epithelial malignant pleural mesothelioma based on analysis of 354 cases

      Vol. 116, Issue 10, 2503, Article first published online: 11 MAR 2010

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      Five-year lung cancer survival : Which advanced stage nonsmall cell lung cancer patients attain long-term survival? (pages 1518–1525)

      Tina Wang, Rebecca A. Nelson, Alicia Bogardus and Frederic W. Grannis Jr

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24871

      Despite aggressive multimodality therapy, 5-year survival in patients with advanced stage nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was very poor and for the most part limited to small and specific pathologic subsets including resectable N2 disease, multiple primary tumors, T3N0, and single site distant metastasis. Patients with advanced stage NSCLC who did not fit into 1 of these subsets had a small chance of long-term survival.

    13. Melanoma
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      A randomized phase 2 study of etaracizumab, a monoclonal antibody against integrin αvβ3, ± dacarbazine in patients with stage IV metastatic melanoma (pages 1526–1534)

      Peter Hersey, Jeffrey Sosman, Steven O'Day, Jon Richards, Agop Bedikian, Rene Gonzalez, William Sharfman, Robert Weber, Theodore Logan, Manuela Buzoianu, Luz Hammershaimb and John M. Kirkwood

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24821

      Preclinical studies suggested that antibodies against the αvβ3 adhesion molecule on melanoma cells could inhibit the growth of melanoma xenografts and induce tumor cell death. The present study evaluated safety characteristics and therapeutic effects of anti-αvβ3 antibody given alone or with standard dacarbazine chemotherapy in patients with metastatic melanoma. The results did not show major effects on progression-free survival or overall survival with or without chemotherapy and did not warrant further evaluation in phase 3 trials.

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      Should all patients with melanoma between 1 and 2 mm Breslow thickness undergo sentinel lymph node biopsy? (pages 1535–1544)

      Michael P. Mays, Robert C. G. Martin, Alison Burton, Brooke Ginter, Michael J. Edwards, Douglas S. Reintgen, Merrick I. Ross, Marshall M. Urist, Arnold J. Stromberg, Kelly M. McMasters and Charles R. Scoggins

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24895

      The authors observed that there is significant diversity of biologic behavior of melanoma between 1 mm and 2 mm in thickness. Sentinel lymph node biopsy is recommended for all such patients to identify those with lymph node metastasis who are at the greatest risk of recurrence and mortality.

    15. Neuro-Oncology
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      5-Aminolevulinic acid is a promising marker for detection of anaplastic foci in diffusely infiltrating gliomas with nonsignificant contrast enhancement (pages 1545–1552)

      Georg Widhalm, Stefan Wolfsberger, Georgi Minchev, Adelheid Woehrer, Martin Krssak, Thomas Czech, Daniela Prayer, Susanne Asenbaum, Johannes A. Hainfellner and Engelbert Knosp

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24903

      Data indicate that 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is a promising marker for intraoperative visualization of anaplastic foci in diffusely infiltrating gliomas with nonsignificant contrast enhancement. The use of 5-ALA may become a novel standard for intraoperative tissue sampling in these tumors, and may therefore optimize allocation of patients to adjuvant treatments.

    16. Sarcoma
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      Prediction of pathologic fracture risk of the femur after combined modality treatment of soft tissue sarcoma of the thigh (pages 1553–1559)

      Yair Gortzak, Gina A. Lockwood, Ashish Mahendra, Ying Wang, Peter W. M. Chung, Charles N. Catton, Brian O'Sullivan, Benjamin M. Deheshi, Jay S. Wunder and Peter C. Ferguson

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24949

      Radiation-related fractures of the femur occurring after surgery and radiotherapy for soft tissue sarcoma are uncommon but difficult to manage, and their nonunion rate is extremely high. The proposed model, presented as a nomogram, suggests that it is possible to predict a patient's risk of fracture with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity, which would allow for the identification of high-risk patients before fracture occurs.

    17. Discipline

      Disparities Research
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      Native American breast cancer survivors' physical conditions and quality of life (pages 1560–1571)

      Linda Burhansstipanov, Linda U. Krebs, Brenda F. Seals, Alice A. Bradley, Judith S. Kaur, Pamela Iron, Mark B. Dignan, Carol Thiel and Eduard Gamito

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24924

      For the first time, survivorship issues are reported specifically for Native American breast cancer patients (n = 266). Half of the patients had difficulties accessing treatment services, and unmanaged cancer pain was among the more prevalent problems.

    18. Epidemiology
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      The association of menstrual and reproductive factors with upper gastrointestinal tract cancers in the NIH-AARP cohort (pages 1572–1581)

      Neal D. Freedman, James V. Lacey Jr, Albert R. Hollenbeck, Michael F. Leitzmann, Arthur Schatzkin and Christian C. Abnet

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24880

      Incidence rates of upper gastrointestinal tract cancers are substantially higher in men than women worldwide. Use of estrogen-progestin menopausal hormone therapy was associated with lower cancer risk, suggesting a possible role of sex hormones in the etiology of these cancers.

    19. Medical Oncology
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      Phase 1 pharmacokinetic and drug-interaction study of dasatinib in patients with advanced solid tumors (pages 1582–1591)

      Faye M. Johnson, Shruti Agrawal, Howard Burris, Lee Rosen, Navneet Dhillon, David Hong, Anne Blackwood-Chirchir, Feng R. Luo, Oumar Sy, Sanjeev Kaul and Alberto A. Chiappori

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24927

      The authors conducted a phase 1 trial of dasatinib in patients with advanced solid tumors and determined a maximum recommended dose of 180 mg once daily based on the incidence of pleural effusion. Coadministration of dasatinib with the cytochrome P450 3A4 inhibitor ketoconazole led to a marked increase in dasatinib exposure, which was correlated with an increase in corrected QT values but not with cardiac toxicity.

  6. Original Article

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Editorials
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Original Article
    8. Original Articles
    9. Correspondence
    1. Discipline

      Outcomes Research
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      Quality of life, self-esteem, fatigue, and sexual function in young men after cancer : A controlled cross-sectional study (pages 1592–1601)

      Diana M. Greenfield, Stephen J. Walters, Robert E. Coleman, Barry W. Hancock, John A. Snowden, Stephen M. Shalet, Leonard R. DeRogatis and Richard J. M. Ross

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24898

      Young male cancer survivors reported a marked impairment in quality of life, energy levels, and quality of sexual functioning, which was worse in those with low testosterone levels. However, psychological distress was not elevated, self-esteem was normal, and sexual relationships were not impaired. The relationship with testosterone is complex, and appears dependent on a threshold level rather than direct correlation.

  7. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Editorials
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Original Article
    8. Original Articles
    9. Correspondence
    1. Discipline

      Symptom Control and Palliative Care
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      Nurses provide valuable proxy assessment of the health-related quality of life of children with Hodgkin disease (pages 1602–1607)

      Robert J. Klaassen, Ronald D. Barr, Joanna Hughes, Paul Rogers, Ronald Anderson, Paul Grundy, S. Kaiser Ali, Rochelle Yanofsky, Oussama Abla, Mariana Silva, Anne-Sophie Carret and Mario Cappelli

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24888

      We prospectively compared the proxy reporting of health-related quality of life (HRQL) by parents and nurses of children with Hodgkin disease to see how well they correlated with the children's report. There was substantial agreement among the parent's, nurse's, and children's reported HRQL scores; moreover, nurses contribute valuable additional information as proxy respondents.

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      Evaluating the ability to detect change of health-related quality of life in children with Hodgkin disease (pages 1608–1614)

      Robert J Klaassen, Murray Krahn, Isabelle Gaboury, Joanna Hughes, Ronald Anderson, Paul Grundy, S. Kaiser Ali, Lawrence Jardine, Oussama Abla, Mariana Silva, Dorothy Barnard and Mario Cappelli

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.24883

      We evaluated 4 different health-related quality of life measures prospectively to determine their ability to detect change over time: the Health Utilities Index Mark 2 and Mark 3, the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) 4.0 Generic Core and Cancer Module, the EuroQol EQ-5D visual analogue scale (EuroQol), and the Lansky Play-Performance Scale. All of the measures were able to detect change in a diverse group of children with Hodgkin disease, with the PedsQL and the EuroQol appearing to be the most sensitive to change.

  8. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Editorials
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Original Article
    8. Original Articles
    9. Correspondence
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