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Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 117 Issue S15

Supplement: National Patient Navigation Leadership Summit (NPNLS): Measuring the Impact and Potential of Patient Navigation, Supplement to Cancer

1 August 2011

Volume 117, Issue S15

Pages i–ii, 3535–3623

  1. Supplement

    1. Top of page
    2. Supplement
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      Measuring the impact and potential of patient navigation : Proposed common metrics and beyond (pages 3535–3536)

      Angelina Esparza and Elizabeth Calhoun

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26265

      In March 2010, the American Cancer Society hosted the National Patient Navigation Leadership Summit. The Summit organizers invited cancer clinicians, researchers, practicing public health experts, funders, and patient navigators to develop a national consensus on common outcomes of patient navigation. The goal of the Summit was to develop and propose core metrics for navigation programs to measure the impact on individuals and populations across the disease continuum. This article describes the Summit and outlines the need for such an endeavor in the effort to support the growth and sustainability of patient navigation.

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      History and principles of patient navigation (pages 3537–3540)

      Harold P. Freeman and Rian L. Rodriguez

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26262

      Patient navigation is a patient-centric health care service delivery intervention, the principal purpose of which is to eliminate barriers, which may occur across the health care continuum, to timely diagnosis and treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases. This intervention, which was pioneered in Harlem, NY, is being widely replicated nationally and is receiving considerable support for demonstration projects and research to test its effectiveness. This article reviews the history of the development of patient navigation and outlines the basic principles of this intervention based on two decades of experience.

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      The role of patient navigators in eliminating health disparities (pages 3541–3550)

      Ana Natale-Pereira, Kimberly R. Enard, Lucinda Nevarez and Lovell A. Jones

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26264

      Patient Navigators can play an integral role in the changing healthcare environment by facilitating access; addressing language, culture, literacy, communication and other barriers; and helping to deliver better quality and more efficient care contributing to the elimination of existing health disparities.

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      Assessing the impact of patient navigation : Prevention and early detection metrics (pages 3551–3562)

      Tracy A. Battaglia, Linda Burhansstipanov, Samantha S. Murrell, Andrea J. Dwyer, and Sarah E. Caron and on behalf of The Prevention and Early Detection Workgroup from the National Patient Navigation Leadership Summit

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26267

      The lack of comparable metrics to evaluate prevention and early detection patient navigation programs impeded the ability to identify best practices. The Prevention and Early Detection Workgroup of the Patient Navigation Leadership Summit conducted a synthesis of the literature to characterize variability in reported clinical metrics and create recommendations for researchers and program evaluators to consider adopting when measuring the impact of their navigation programs.

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      Metrics for evaluating patient navigation during cancer diagnosis and treatment : Crafting a policy-relevant research agenda for patient navigation in cancer care (pages 3563–3572)

      B. Ashleigh Guadagnolo, Daniel Dohan and Peter Raich

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26269

      Patient navigation during diagnosis and treatment of cancer is an emerging health care delivery innovation designed to facilitate care for patients who experience health access barriers. Core metrics are proposed to shape a policy-relevant research agenda for assessing the role of patient navigation in improving quality of cancer-care delivery during diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

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      Survivorship navigation outcome measures : A report from the acs patient navigation working group on survivorship navigation (pages 3573–3582)

      Mandi Pratt-Chapman, Melissa A. Simon, Angela K. Patterson, Betsy C. Risendal and Steven Patierno

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26261

      Survivorship navigation may improve appropriate health care utilization through education and care coordination, potentially improving health outcomes and quality of life of cancer survivors while reducing cost to the health care system.

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Erratum: Survivorship navigation outcome measures: A report from the ACS Patient Navigation Working Group on Survivorship Navigation

      Vol. 118, Issue 21, 5450, Article first published online: 20 MAR 2012

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      Navigation and palliative care (pages 3583–3589)

      Joshua Hauser, Melissa Sileo, Nicole Araneta, Rachel Kirk, Jeanne Martinez, Katie Finn, Joanne Calista, Ercilia Calcano, Lynda Thibodaux, Carol Harney, Kelli Bass and Mary Kathryn Rodrigue

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26266

      Patient navigation represents an opportunity to further the integration of palliative care with standard cancer care. This article defines palliative and hospice care and describes some of the current challenges of integrating palliative care into other forms of care. It also considers outcomes that navigation might be expected to improve for patients receiving palliative care or enrolled in hospice, including symptom relief; communication efficacy; transitions of care; and access to palliative care, hospice, and bereavement care for families.

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      Patients, family caregivers, and patient navigators : A partnership approach (pages 3590–3600)

      Guadalupe R. Palos and Martha Hare

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26263

      This article proposes strengthening patient navigation services by partnering with key persons from a patient's social support and network. The Partnership Approach recognizes the benefits of allowing members of the patient's social network to help in the care of the patient. This novel approach maximizes the family's role and efforts in helping to achieve a positive outcome for their loved one.

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      Patient-reported outcome measures suitable to assessment of patient navigation (pages 3601–3615)

      Kevin Fiscella, Sean Ransom, Pascal Jean-Pierre, David Cella, Kevin Stein, Joseph E. Bauer, Rebecca Crane-Okada, Sharon Gentry, Rosalie Canosa, Tenbroeck Smith, Jean Sellers, Emilia Jankowski and Karyn Walsh

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26260

      The Patient-Reported Outcomes Working Group developed a series of measures relevant to patient navigation for cancer-related care. These measures should prove useful for evaluation of patient navigation research and programs.

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      Establishing common cost measures to evaluate the economic value of patient navigation programs (pages 3616–3623)

      Elizabeth Whitley, Patricia Valverde, Kristen Wells, Loretta Williams, Taylor Teschner and Ya-Chen Tina Shih

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26268

      Evaluation of the costs of interventions and programs involving patient navigator services is important yet lacking in the literature. Common cost metrics are proposed to demonstrate the economic impact of patient navigation to facilitate decision making regarding sustainability.

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