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Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 117 Issue 4

15 February 2011

Volume 117, Issue 4

Pages 657–878

  1. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    7. Erratum
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  2. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    7. Erratum
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      The relevant distinction between “progression” in ovarian cancer drug trials and the clinical decision to change therapy (pages 660–661)

      Maurie Markman

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25459

      It is rational to suggest that the decision to alter treatment in advanced ovarian cancer should be based on the totality of evidence that the disease is worsening, on patient tolerability of the therapy, and on a determination that the current regimen is providing no benefit or unacceptably limited benefit to the specific individual. Knowledge of an objective measure of “progression” should play an important, but not a singular, role.

  3. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    7. Erratum
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      Experimental therapeutics for patients with myeloproliferative neoplasias (pages 662–676)

      Meetu Agrawal, Ravin J. Garg, Jorge Cortes, Hagop Kantarjian, Srdan Verstovsek and Alfonso Quintas-Cardama

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25672

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      Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) such as essential thrombocythemia, polythemia vera, and primary myelofibrosis, have been historically managed with palliative intent. Recently, small molecule inhibitors of Janus kinase (JAK) 2, a kinase frequently mutated in MPNs, has spurred the development of novel therapeutics. Other novel non-tyrosine kinase inhibitor approaches such as immunomodulatory agents and pegylated interferon-α have also shown promising results in MPNs.

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      The role of epigenetic transcription repression and DNA methyltransferases in cancer (pages 677–687)

      Filipe Ivan Daniel, Karen Cherubini, Liliane Soares Yurgel, Maria Antonia Zancanaro de Figueiredo and Fernanda Gonçalves Salum

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25482

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      Epigenetic alterations such as global genomic hypomethylation and aberrant hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes have been implicated in the development of various cancers. As DNA methyltransferases may contribute to tumor progression through methylation-mediated gene inactivation, this article reviewed the main epigenetic mechanisms for regulating transcription and its implication in cancer development.

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      Intolerance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myeloid leukemia : Definitions and clinical implications (pages 688–697)

      Javier Pinilla-Ibarz, Jorge Cortes and Michael J. Mauro

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25648

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      This review evaluates the concept of intolerance to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy in light of new therapeutic options for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Current definitions of intolerance to available TKIs are reviewed.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    7. Erratum
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
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      Surgical treatment of breast cancer among the elderly in the United States (pages 698–704)

      Amy K. Alderman, Julie Bynum, Jason Sutherland, Nancy Birkmeyer, E. Dale Collins and John Birkmeyer

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25617

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      This is a description of the overall use of breast-conserving therapy among elderly breast cancer patients in the United States, and an evaluation of nonclinical factors associated with surgical breast cancer care.

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      Stability of estrogen receptor status in breast carcinoma : A comparison between primary and metastatic tumors with regard to disease course and intervening systemic therapy (pages 705–713)

      Yun Gong, Eric Yulong Han, Ming Guo, Lajos Pusztai and Nour Sneige

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25506

      This study demonstrates a high concordance in estrogen receptor (ER) status status between primary and paired metastatic carcinomas. ER status is not significantly influenced by metastatic site, intervening interval, or prior chemotherapy or endocrine therapy.

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      Effectiveness of population-based service screening with mammography for women ages 40 to 49 years : Evaluation of the Swedish Mammography Screening in Young Women (SCRY) cohort (pages 714–722)

      Barbro Numan Hellquist, Stephen W. Duffy, Shahin Abdsaleh, Lena Björneld, Pál Bordás, László Tabár, Bedrich Viták, Sophia Zackrisson, Lennarth Nyström and Håkan Jonsson

      Version of Record online: 29 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25650

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      There still is no consensus regarding the effectiveness of mammography screening for women ages 40 to 49 years. In the current study, which is the largest to date for this age group and included all of Sweden for an average follow-up of 16 years, mammography screening for women ages 40 to 49 years was effective for reducing breast cancer mortality.

    4. Gastrointestinal Disease
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      PDX-1 : Demonstration of oncogenic properties in pancreatic cancer (pages 723–733)

      Shi-He Liu, Sanjeet Patel, Marie-Claude Gingras, John Nemunaitis, Guisheng Zhou, Changyi Chen, Min Li, William Fisher, Richard Gibbs and F. Charles Brunicardi

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25629

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      PDX-1 is a potential oncogene to mediate tumorigenesis in light of its enhancement of cell proliferation, invasion, and induction of transformation in vitro and promotion of tumor growth in vivo.

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      Overexpression of receptor tyrosine kinase Axl promotes tumor cell invasion and survival in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (pages 734–743)

      Xianzhou Song, Hua Wang, Craig D. Logsdon, Asif Rashid, Jason B. Fleming, James L. Abbruzzese, Henry F. Gomez, Douglas B. Evans and Huamin Wang

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25483

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      Receptor tyrosine kinase Axl is associated with poor prognosis in patients with stage II pancreatic cancer and promotes invasion and survival of pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, targeting the Axl signaling pathway may represent a new approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

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      Association of multi-drug resistance gene polymorphisms with pancreatic cancer outcome (pages 744–751)

      Motofumi Tanaka, Taro Okazaki, Hideo Suzuki, James L. Abbruzzese and Donghui Li

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25510

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      In this study, we demonstrated that polymorphic variants of drug resistance genes MRP5 and MRP2 are associated with tumor response to gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy and overall survival in patients with potentially resectable pancreatic cancer. This information has the potential to help with treatment selection for individualized therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    7. Genitourinary Disease
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      Gemcitabine and docetaxel in metastatic, castrate-resistant prostate cancer : Results from a phase 2 trial (pages 752–757)

      Jorge A. Garcia, Thomas E. Hutson, Dale Shepard, Paul Elson and Robert Dreicer

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25457

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      In this study, the efficacy of combined gemcitabine plus docetaxel as treatment for patients with metastatic, castrate-resistant prostate cancer was similar to the efficacy of single-agent docetaxel. The combination was moderately toxic and primarily had an impact on bone marrow reserve.

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      Phase 1 dose-escalation trial of tremelimumab plus sunitinib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (pages 758–767)

      Brian I. Rini, Mark Stein, Pat Shannon, Simantini Eddy, Allison Tyler, Joe J. Stephenson Jr, Lorie Catlett, Bo Huang, Diane Healey and Michael Gordon

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25639

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      On the basis of potential additive or synergistic immunostimulatory antitumor effects, this phase 1 study evaluated the combination of sunitinib and tremelimumab (CP-675206, an antibody against cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4) in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. However, rapid-onset acute renal failure was observed unexpectedly in patients who received this combination, and further investigation of tremelimumab doses ≥6 mg/kg administered once every 12 weeks plus sunitinib 37.5 mg daily was not recommended.

    9. Gynecologic Oncology
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      Prognostic model for survival in patients with early stage cervical cancer (pages 768–776)

      Petra Biewenga, Jacobus van der Velden, Ben Willem J. Mol, Lukas J. A. Stalpers, Marten S. Schilthuis, Jan Willem van der Steeg, Matthé P. M. Burger and Marrije R. Buist

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25658

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      In patients with early stage cervical cancer, disease-specific survival can be predicted with a statistical model. Models, such as that presented here, should be used in clinical trials on the effects of adjuvant treatments in high-risk early cervical cancer patients, both to stratify and to include patients.

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      Ovarian cancer care for the underserved: Are surgical patterns of care different in a public hospital setting? (pages 777–783)

      Leslie R. Boyd, Akiva P. Novetsky and John P. Curtin

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25490

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      The public hospital system provides care for patients without regard to insurance status, largely serving patients of low socioeconomic status. Patients receiving ovarian cancer surgery in the nation's largest public hospital system were found to be less likely to be treated by subspecialist gynecologic oncologists and less likely to have high-volume surgeons involved in their care.

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      Trichostatin A restores Apaf-1 function in chemoresistant ovarian cancer cells (pages 784–794)

      Lijun Tan, Roland P. Kwok, Abhishek Shukla, Malti Kshirsagar, Lili Zhao, Anthony W. Opipari Jr and J. Rebecca Liu

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25649

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      Resistance of ovarian cancer cells to the proapoptotic effects of chemotherapy is due in part to deficient Apaf-1 activity. Trichostatin A restores Apaf-1 function independent of alterations in Apaf-1 expression.

    12. Head and Neck Disease
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      A phase 2 study of pemetrexed plus gemcitabine every 2 weeks for patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell cancer (pages 795–801)

      Matthew G. Fury, Sofia Haque, Hilda Stambuk, Ronglai Shen, Diane Carlson and David Pfister

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25464

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      Treatment with pemetrexed plus gemcitabine every 2 weeks with vitamin support generally was well tolerated in patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). The results from this study provided further evidence that pemetrexed may have significant palliative activity against advanced HNSCC.

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      Long-term outcomes of microsurgical reconstruction for large tracheal defects (pages 802–808)

      Peirong Yu, Gary L. Clayman and Garrett L. Walsh

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25492

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      Microsurgical reconstruction of long tracheal defects with radial forearm free flap for lining and prosthetic material for rigid support may yield good outcomes in selected patients.

    14. Lung Disease
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      Biomarker-based phase I dose-escalation, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic study of oral apricoxib in combination with erlotinib in advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (pages 809–818)

      Karen Reckamp, Barbara Gitlitz, Lin-Chi Chen, Ravi Patel, Ginger Milne, Mary Syto, Deborah Jezior and Sara Zaknoen

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25473

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      Twenty patients with stage IIIB/IV nonsmall cell lung cancer were treated with apricoxib, a novel cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (100, 200, or 400 mg/day), in combination with 150 mg/day erlotinib. Treatment was well tolerated and associated with a 60% disease control rate and greater antitumor activity in patients with a decrease from baseline prostaglandin E2 metabolite (PGE-M). Therefore, 400 mg/day apricoxib plus 150 mg/day erlotinib is being investigated in a phase II study in patients selected based on change in urinary PGE-M.

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      Association of diffuse, random pulmonary metastases, including miliary metastases, with epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in lung adenocarcinoma (pages 819–825)

      Yosuke Togashi, Katsuhiro Masago, Takeshi Kubo, Yuichi Sakamori, Young Hak Kim, Yukimasa Hatachi, Akiko Fukuhara, Tadashi Mio, Kaori Togashi and Michiaki Mishima

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25618

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      Lung adenocarcinoma with accompanying epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations tends to develop diffuse, random pulmonary metastases, including miliary metastases. In contrast, lung adenocarcinoma with the wild-type EGFR gene tends to develop other pulmonary metastases.

    16. Sarcoma
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      A phase 2 trial of imatinib mesylate in patients with recurrent nonresectable chondrosarcomas expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α or -β : An Italian Sarcoma Group study (pages 826–831)

      Giovanni Grignani, Emanuela Palmerini, Silvia Stacchiotti, Antonella Boglione, Virginia Ferraresi, Sergio Frustaci, Alessandro Comandone, Paolo G Casali, Stefano Ferrari and Massimo Aglietta

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25632

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      A prospective trial of imatinib mesylate was conducted in patients with nonresectable chondrosarcomas expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-α and PDGFR-β. This targeted therapy does not appear to improve prognosis in patients with chemorefractory disease.

    17. Discipline

      Clinical Trials
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      Reporting time-to-event endpoints and response rates in 4 decades of randomized controlled trials in advanced colorectal cancer (pages 832–840)

      Hendrik-Tobias Arkenau, Ina Nordman, Timothy Dobbins and Robyn Ward

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25636

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      Reports from trials in patients with advanced colorectal cancer revealed deficiencies in the capture of clinical endpoints. The current results indicated that only some intermediate endpoints serve as reliable historic benchmarks of the effect of 5-fluorouracil.

    18. Epidemiology
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      Short duration of sleep increases risk of colorectal adenoma (pages 841–847)

      Cheryl L. Thompson, Emma K. Larkin, Sanjay Patel, Nathan A. Berger, Susan Redline and Li Li

      Version of Record online: 8 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25507

      In this study, we present evidence that short sleep duration is associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas, a precursor of colorectal cancer. This research provides important epidemiological data of a novel risk factor for colorectal and highlights the potential of a sleep intervention to reduce colorectal adenoma incidence in individuals who average less than 6 hours of sleep per night.

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      Marijuana use and testicular germ cell tumors (pages 848–853)

      Britton Trabert, Alice J. Sigurdson, Anne M. Sweeney, Sara S. Strom and Katherine A. McGlynn

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25499

      Consistent with the findings of a previous report, the authors observed an association between frequent and long-term marijuana use and the occurrence of nonseminoma germ cell tumors of the testis in this hospital-based case-control study.

    20. Outcomes Research
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      Structural and reliability analysis of a patient satisfaction with cancer-related care measure : A Multisite patient navigation research program study (pages 854–861)

      Pascal Jean-Pierre, Kevin Fiscella, Karen M. Freund, Jack Clark, Julie Darnell, Alan Holden, Douglas Post, Steven R. Patierno, Paul C. Winters and the Patient Navigation Research Program Group

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25501

      The Patient Satisfaction With Cancer Care is a reliable tool for assessing satisfaction for cancer-related care across diverse racial/ethnic and socioeconomic populations.

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      Low triglyceride and nonuse of statins is associated with cancer in type 2 diabetes mellitus : The Hong Kong Diabetes Registry (pages 862–871)

      Xilin Yang, Ronald C.W. Ma, Wing Yee So, Linda W. L. Yu, Alice P. S. Kong, Gary T. C. Ko, Gang Xu, Risa Ozaki, Peter C. Y. Tong and Juliana C. N. Chan

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25455

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      In type 2 diabetic patients, low triglyceride defined as <1.70 mmol/L was associated with cancer, and the association was attenuated by use of statins. Patients with triglyceride <1.70 mmol/L plus nonuse of statins during follow-up had 2.74-fold increased cancer risk compared with their counterparts without copresence of both risk factors.

  5. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    7. Erratum
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      Bladder cancer and BCG response prediction : What we must know? (page 872)

      Tommaso Cai and Gianni Malossini

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25400

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      Reply to bladder cancer and BCG response prediction: What we must know? (pages 872–873)

      Peter U. Ardelt, Hubertus Riedmiller and Wadih Arap

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25388

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      Intra-arterial chemotherapy for head and neck cancer : Is there a verdict? (page 874)

      Coen R. N. Rasch, Michael Hauptmann and Alfons J. M. Balm

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25577

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      Reply to Intra-arterial chemotherapy for head and neck cancer : Is there a verdict? (pages 874–875)

      K. Thomas Robbins and Stephen B. Howell

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25576

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      Radiofrequency ablation as an adjunct to systemic chemotherapy for colorectal pulmonary metastases (page 876)

      Motoshi Takao, Koichiro Yamakado and Kan Takeda

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25549

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  6. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    7. Erratum
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      Erratum: Policy Implications of Early Onset Breast Cancer Among Mexican-Origin Women (page 878)

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25680

      This article corrects:

      Policy implications of early onset breast cancer among Mexican-origin women

      Vol. 117, Issue 2, 390–397, Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2010

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