You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article

Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 117 Issue 6

15 March 2011

Volume 117, Issue 6

Pages 1107–1391

  1. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
      HER2 studies look promising (page 1109)

      Funda Meric-Bernstam

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26024

  2. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Editorial for “prediction of significant prostate cancer diagnosed 20 to 30 years later with a single measure of prostate-specific antigen at or before age 50” (pages 1110–1112)

      Gerald L. Andriole and Adam S. Kibel

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25559

      Prostate cancer screening with PSA as currently practiced is fraught with overdetection. Finding a new way to use PSA may allow us to focus our screening and diagnostic efforts on the men most in need.

  3. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Monitoring molecular response in chronic myeloid leukemia (pages 1113–1122)

      Jorge Cortes, Alfonso Quintás-Cardama and Hagop M. Kantarjian

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25527

      Before the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, the evaluation of hematologic and cytogenetic responses was sufficient to gauge treatment efficacy in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Deeper molecular responses are now commonly achieved, necessitating a reliance on molecular monitoring to assess residual leukemic disease. Still, complete cytogenetic response remains the gold standard for an adequate response in CML.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Screening, risk assessment, and the approach to therapy in patients with prostate cancer (pages 1123–1135)

      Stephen J. Freedland

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25477

      Accurate risk assessment in patients with prostate cancer is critical to ensuring appropriate treatment for those at significant risk of progression while avoiding unnecessary intervention in low-risk patients. This review discusses the tools available for the stratification of risk at each clinical stage of the disease.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Conservative and dietary interventions for cancer-related lymphedema : A Systematic review and meta-analysis (pages 1136–1148)

      Margaret L. McNeely, Carolyn J. Peddle, Janice L. Yurick, Ian S. Dayes and John R. Mackey

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25513

      The findings support the use of compression garments and compression bandaging for reducing lymphedema volume in upper and lower extremity cancer-related lymphedema. Specific to breast cancer, a statistically significant, clinically small beneficial effect was found from the addition of manual lymph drainage massage to compression therapy for upper extremity lymphedema volume.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Ductal carcinoma in situ treated with breast-conserving surgery and accelerated partial breast irradiation : Comparison of the Mammosite registry trial with intergroup study E5194 (pages 1149–1155)

      Sharad Goyal, Frank Vicini, Peter D. Beitsch, Henry Kuerer, Martin Keisch, Sabin Motwani, Jacqueline S. Jeruss, Maureen Lyden and Bruce G. Haffty

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25615

      The purpose of this study was to determine the ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in ductal carcinoma in situ patients treated in the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial who met the criteria of E5194 treated with local excision and adjuvant accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). It was found that patients who met the criteria for E5194 treated with APBI had extremely low rates of recurrence (0% vs 6.1% in the LIG cohort and 5.3% vs 15.3% in the HG cohort).

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Ductal carcinoma in situ treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy: A comparison with ECOG study 5194 (pages 1156–1162)

      Sabin B. Motwani, Sharad Goyal, Meena S. Moran, Arpit Chhabra and Bruce G. Haffty

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25623

      Recent data from Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Study 5194 (E5194) prospectively defined a low-risk subset of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) patients where radiation therapy was omitted after lumpectomy alone. Adjuvant whole breast radiation therapy reduced the rate of local recurrence by more than 70% in patients with DCIS who met the criteria of E5194.

    3. Gastrointestinal Disease
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Autoimmune disease and subsequent risk of developing alimentary tract cancers among 4.5 million US male veterans (pages 1163–1171)

      Annelie M. Landgren, Ola Landgren, Gloria Gridley, Graça M. Dores, Martha S. Linet and Lindsay M. Morton

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25524

      In a study of autoimmune disease and alimentary tract cancer risk among 4,501,578 US male veterans, the authors found that a prior history of certain autoimmune conditions with known alimentary tract involvement was associated with increased risks of developing alimentary tract cancers, supporting the importance of localized inflammation in carcinogenesis. Future research is needed to confirm these findings and improve understanding of underlying mechanisms by which autoimmune diseases contribute to alimentary tract carcinogenesis.

    4. Genitourinary Disease
      You have free access to this content
      Recurrence-free survival in prostate cancer is related to increased stromal TRAIL expression (pages 1172–1182)

      Mariam Anees, Peter Horak, Ahmed El-Gazzar, Martin Susani, Georg Heinze, Paul Perco, Massimo Loda, Rosina Lis, Michael Krainer and William K. Oh

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25504

      Expression of the components of the pro-apoptotic TRAIL pathway is altered in prostate cancer. TRAIL expression in the tumor microenvironment may affect recurrence-free survival rate of prostate cancer patients.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The impact of tumor burden characteristics in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with sunitinib (pages 1183–1189)

      Naveen S. Basappa, Paul Elson, Ali-Reza Golshayan, Laura Wood, Jorge A. Garcia, Robert Dreicer and Brian I. Rini

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25713

      Tumor burden characteristics over time are significantly and independently associated with clinical outcome in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who are treated with sunitinib. In general, a lower tumor burden at baseline and a greater reduction in tumor burden with therapy are associated with more favorable outcome.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Gemcitabine and radiotherapy plus cisplatin after transurethral resection as conservative treatment for infiltrating bladder cancer : Long-term cumulative results of 2 prospective single-institution studies (pages 1190–1196)

      Orazio Caffo, Gianni Fellin, Umberto Graffer, Salvatore Mussari, Luigi Tomio and Enzo Galligioni

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25667

      Long-term follow-up results confirmed that the addition of gemcitabine in the conservative treatment of patients with infiltrating bladder cancer produces good clinical outcomes, mainly in terms of bladder preservation.

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Association of hyaluronic acid family members (HAS1, HAS2, and HYAL-1) with bladder cancer diagnosis and prognosis (pages 1197–1209)

      Mario W. Kramer, Diogo O. Escudero, Soum D. Lokeshwar, Roozbeh Golshani, Obi O. Ekwenna, Kristell Acosta, Axel S. Merseburger, Mark Soloway and Vinata B. Lokeshwar

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25565

      Among hyaluronic acid (HA) family members—HA synthases (HAS1, HAS2, HAS3), HA receptors (CD44s, CDD4v, RHAMM), and HYAL-1 hyaluronidase—HYAL-1 expression correlated with both metastasis and disease-specific mortality, and HAS1 expression correlated with metastasis. Combined HAS2–HYAL-1 mRNA levels in exfoliated urothelial cells detected BCa with high accuracy and were associated with subsequent recurrence.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Prediction of significant prostate cancer diagnosed 20 to 30 years later with a single measure of prostate-specific antigen at or before age 50 (pages 1210–1219)

      Hans Lilja, Angel M. Cronin, Anders Dahlin, Jonas Manjer, Peter M. Nilsson, James A. Eastham, Anders S. Bjartell, Peter T. Scardino, David Ulmert and Andrew J. Vickers

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25568

      In a case-control study nested within a large population-based cohort not subject to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, PSA before age 50 strongly predicted long-term risk of prostate cancer diagnosis, providing independent replication of a prior finding. Seventy-nine percent of prostate cancer diagnoses and 81% of advanced cancer diagnoses occurred in men whose PSA at ages 44-50 was above the median, suggesting that PSA at this age could be used to stratify men for frequency of subsequent prostate cancer screening.

    9. Gynecologic Oncology
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The use of recombinant erythropoietin for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia in patients with ovarian cancer does not affect progression-free or overall survival (pages 1220–1226)

      Leigh A. Cantrell, Shannon N. Westin and Linda Van Le

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25590

      Erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs) are indicated to treat chemotherapy-induced anemia; however, recent questions regarding their safety have been raised. In this study, the authors observed that ESAs were not associated with more rapid disease progression or increased mortality in patients with ovarian cancer.

    10. Head and Neck Disease
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      p14ARF genetic polymorphisms and susceptibility to second primary malignancy in patients with index squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (pages 1227–1235)

      Yang Zhang, Erich M. Sturgis, Mark E. Zafereo, Qingyi Wei and Guojun Li

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25605

      The current results indicated that polymorphisms of the tumor suppressor gene p14ARF, an alternate reading frame (ARF) product of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (or INK4a) locus, may modulate the risk of second primary malignancy in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. These p14ARF polymorphisms may be risk markers for genetic susceptibility to SPMs in patients who have primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    11. Hematologic Malignancies
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A phase 1-2 study of a farnesyltransferase inhibitor, tipifarnib, combined with idarubicin and cytarabine for patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (pages 1236–1244)

      Elias Jabbour, Hagop Kantarjian, Farhad Ravandi, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, Zeev Estrov, Srdan Verstovsek, Susan O'Brien, Stefan Faderl, Deborah A. Thomas, John J. Wright and Jorge Cortes

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25575

      A phase 1/2 study of tipifarnib in combination with idarubicin and cytarabine (IA) was conducted in 95 patients with previously untreated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. With a median follow-up of 33 months, 61 patients achieved complete remission (64%) and 9 achieved CRp (9%). The median complete remission duration and overall survival were 19 and 17 months, respectively. The most common grade 3 adverse events included gastrointestinal toxicities, liver dysfunction, and skin rash. In conclusion, the combination of IA and tipifarnib is safe and active. Further studies exploring different dosages and schedules are warranted, particularly in patients with high-risk AML.

    12. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Peripheral blood monitoring of chronic myeloid leukemia during treatment with imatinib, second-line agents, and beyond (pages 1245–1252)

      Lisa Lima, Leon Bernal-Mizrachi, Debra Saxe, Karen P. Mann, Mourad Tighiouart, Martha Arellano, Leonard Heffner, Morgan McLemore, Amelia Langston, Elliott Winton and Hanna Jean Khoury

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25678

      In this article, the authors analyzed simultaneously obtained bone marrow cytogenetics (CTG)/ fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and blood FISH/PCR in 70 patients with all phases of chronic myeloid leukemia who were treated with modern therapies. To the authors' knowledge, the current study is the first to provide information regarding correlations obtained on simultaneously obtained BM and blood FISH and PCR and marrow CTG simultaneous FISH, PCR, and CTG; and provides correlations in patients treated with imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, bosutinib, and homoharringtonine.

    13. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A Phase 2 study of combination therapy with arsenic trioxide and gemtuzumab ozogamicin in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes or secondary acute myeloid leukemia (pages 1253–1261)

      Mikkael A. Sekeres, Jaroslaw P. Maciejewski, Harry P. Erba, Manuel Afable, Ricki Englehaupt, Ronald Sobecks, Anjali Advani, Sherry Seel, Josephine Chan and Matt E. Kalaycio

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25686

      This Phase 2 study explored the safety and efficacy of combination therapy with arsenic trioxide (ATO) and gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) in patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or secondary (arising from MDS) acute myeloid leukemia. The outpatient regimen of ATO plus GO represents a reasonable alternative to remission induction therapy, and a novel approach to treating patients who have failed standard hypomethylator therapy for higher-risk MDS.

    14. Lung Disease
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Tumor response and progression-free survival as potential surrogate endpoints for overall survival in extensive stage small-cell lung cancer : Findings on the basis of North Central Cancer Treatment Group trials (pages 1262–1271)

      Nathan R. Foster, Yingwei Qi, Qian Shi, James E. Krook, John W. Kugler, James R. Jett, Julian R. Molina, Steven E. Schild, Alex A. Adjei and Sumithra J. Mandrekar

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25526

      A pooled analysis of 9 extensive stage small-cell lung cancer studies found that progression-free survival (PFS) is an improved endpoint over tumor response at predicting overall survival (OS) and subsequent survival. PFS also shows promise as a potential surrogate for OS, but further validation is needed using data from a larger number of randomized phase 3 trials.

    15. Neuro-Oncology
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Anatomic location is a risk factor for atypical and malignant meningiomas (pages 1272–1278)

      Ari J. Kane, Michael E. Sughrue, Martin J. Rutkowski, Gopal Shangari, Shanna Fang, Michael W. McDermott, Mitchel S. Berger and Andrew T. Parsa

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25591

      Nonskull base meningiomas, male sex, and prior surgery impart increased risk for grade II or III pathology. This increased risk translates to probable poorer prognosis and increased likelihood of recurrence after treatment. Thus, it is prudent to take these variables into consideration in conjunction with the complete clinical presentation when advising patients regarding their prognosis.

    16. Sarcoma
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A prognostic model for soft tissue sarcoma of the extremities and trunk wall based on size, vascular invasion, necrosis, and growth pattern (pages 1279–1287)

      Ana Carneiro, Par-Ola Bendahl, Jacob Engellau, Henryk A. Domanski, Christopher D. Fletcher, Pehr Rissler, Anders Rydholm and Mef Nilbert

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25621

      The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that size, vascular invasion, necrosis, and peripheral tumor growth pattern independently predict metastasis in soft tissue sarcoma. The combination of these factors into a prognostic model, referred to as SING, compared favorably with other widely used prognostic systems.

    17. Discipline

      Epidemiology
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Lung cancer mortality risk among breast cancer patients treated with anti-estrogens (pages 1288–1295)

      Christine Bouchardy, Simone Benhamou, Robin Schaffar, Helena M. Verkooijen, Gerald Fioretta, Hyma Schubert, Vincent Vinh-Hung, Jean-Charles Soria, Georges Vlastos and Elisabetta Rapiti

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25638

      The Women's Health Initiative study reported that menopausal hormone therapy increases the risk of lung cancer mortality. In our population-based study, we show that use of anti-estrogens among breast cancer patients is associated with a decreased risk in lung cancer mortality.

    18. Medical Oncology
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Timing of administration of bevacizumab chemotherapy affects wound healing after chest wall port placement (pages 1296–1301)

      Joseph P. Erinjeri, Abigail J. Fong, Nancy E. Kemeny, Karen T. Brown, George I. Getrajdman and Stephen B. Solomon

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25573

      The risk of a wound dehiscence requiring chest wall port explant in patients treated with bevacizumab was inversely proportional to the interval between bevacizumab administration and port placement. There was significantly higher risk of wound dehiscence when the interval between bevacizumab administration and chest wall port placement was less than 14 days.

    19. Outcomes Research
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Prospective evaluation of the reliability, validity, and minimally important difference of the functional assessment of cancer therapy-gastric (FACT-Ga) quality-of-life instrument (pages 1302–1312)

      Sheila N. Garland, Guy Pelletier, Andrew Lawe, Bradly J. Biagioni, Jay Easaw, Michael Eliasziw, David Cella and Oliver F. Bathe

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25556

      The current results indicated that the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Gastric version (FACT-Ga) provides a valid and reliable measurement of quality of life (QoL) in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. It is a useful instrument for QoL assessment in clinical trials and for the detection of significant changes in the QoL of individual patients.

    20. Pediatric Oncology
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Randomized trial of 2 dosages of prophylactic granulocyte–colony-stimulating factor after induction chemotherapy in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (pages 1313–1320)

      Hiroto Inaba, Xueyuan Cao, Stanley Pounds, Ching-Hon Pui, Jeffrey E. Rubnitz, Raul C. Ribeiro and Bassem I. Razzouk

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25536

      In this double-blind study, the authors analyzed the effect of 2 randomly assigned dose levels (5 μg/kg daily and 10 μg/kg daily) of granulocyte–colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) given after induction chemotherapy to 46 pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia. The higher G-CSF dose offered no greater benefit than the lower dose in the number of days of G-CSF treatment, neutropenia, or hospitalization; the number of episodes of febrile neutropenia, grade 2 through 4 infection, or antimicrobial therapy; transfusion requirements; the cost of supportive care; or survival.

    21. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The selective Trk inhibitor AZ623 inhibits brain-derived neurotrophic factor–mediated neuroblastoma cell proliferation and signaling and is synergistic with topotecan (pages 1321–1391)

      Peter E. Zage, Timothy C. Graham, Lizhi Zeng, Wendy Fang, Christine Pien, Ken Thress, Charles Omer, Jeffrey L. Brown and Patrick A. Zweidler -McKay

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.25674

      Children with high-risk and recurrent or refractory neuroblastoma have extremely poor outcomes, and have a critical need for new treatment options. The authors demonstrated that AZ623 inhibits TrkB signaling in neuroblastoma cells and that the combination of Trk inhibition with AZ623 and topotecan is effective against neuroblastoma tumor cells in both in vitro and in vivo model systems.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION