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Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 118 Issue 24

15 December 2012

Volume 118, Issue 24

Pages 6015–6314

  1. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Errata
    7. Information Item
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    2. You have free access to this content
    3. You have free access to this content
  2. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Errata
    7. Information Item
    1. You have free access to this content
      Young adults, cancer, health insurance, socioeconomic status, and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (pages 6018–6021)

      Archie Bleyer, Corinne Ulrich and Sean Martin

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27685

      The lack of health insurance in young adults in the United States explains much of the delay in the diagnosis of, and more advanced cancer in, this age group compared with younger and older persons. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act should begin to rectify the disparity as evidenced by the 2.5-million increase in the number of individuals aged 19 years to 25 years covered by health insurance since passage of the Act in September 2010.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Errata
    7. Information Item
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
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      Pathologic characteristics of second breast cancers after breast conservation for ductal carcinoma in situ (pages 6022–6030)

      Nils D. Arvold, Rinaa S. Punglia, Melissa E. Hughes, Wei Jiang, Stephen B. Edge, Sara H. Javid, Christine Laronga, Joyce C. Niland, Richard L. Theriault, Jane C. Weeks, Yu-Ning Wong, Sandra J. Lee and Michael J. Hassett

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27691

      Among women who undergo breast conservation for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and later develop a second breast cancer in either breast, both grade and estrogen receptor status are associated significantly between the index DCIS and the second breast cancer. These data suggest that women with DCIS may be more likely to experience second breast cancers of a phenotype similar to that of their index DCIS regardless of breast laterality.

    2. Gastrointestinal Disease
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      Value of cytologic Papanicolaou smears and polymerase chain reaction screening for human papillomavirus DNA in detecting anal intraepithelial neoplasia : Comparison with histology of a surgical sample (pages 6031–6038)

      Isabelle Etienney, Sarra Vuong, Ali Si-Mohamed, Jean-François Fléjou, Patrick Atienza, Pierre Bauer and and the Cytological Diaconesses Group

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27671

      Compared with a large surgical sample, anal cytologic Papanicolaou smears and human papillomavirus polymerase chain reaction exhibited varied sensitivity and specificity according to the risk of human papillomavirus infection and anal intraepithelial neoplasia. This study explores the potential of these examinations as screening strategies for precancerous anal lesions based on the population at risk.

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      Molecular investigation of lymph nodes in colon cancer patients using one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) : A new road to better staging? (pages 6039–6045)

      Ulrich Güller, Andreas Zettl, Mathias Worni, Igor Langer, Daniela Cabalzar-Wondberg, Carsten T. Viehl, Nicolas Demartines and Markus Zuber

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27667

      The authors assessed 313 lymph nodes from consecutive patients with colon cancer using one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA). OSNA is a powerful molecular tool for the detection of lymph node metastases in patients with colon cancer and has improved performance compared with standard hematoxylin and eosin analysis.

    4. Genitourinary Disease
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      The quantitative Gleason score improves prostate cancer risk assessment (pages 6046–6054)

      Adam C. Reese, Janet E. Cowan, Jonathan S. Brajtbord, Catherine R. Harris, Peter R. Carroll and Matthew R. Cooperberg

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27670

      The current study proposes a modification of the Gleason score used to grade prostate cancer, converting it to a continuous score based on the weighted average of Gleason patterns present in the pathology specimen. This quantitative Gleason score improves prostate cancer risk assessment, both before and after radical prostatectomy.

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      Two phase 2 trials of the novel Akt inhibitor perifosine in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma after progression on vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy (pages 6055–6062)

      Daniel C. Cho, Thomas E. Hutson, Wolfram Samlowski, Peter Sportelli, Brad Somer, Paul Richards, Jeffrey A. Sosman, Igor Puzanov, M. Dror Michaelson, Keith T. Flaherty, Robert A. Figlin and Nicholas J. Vogelzang

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27668

      The novel Akt inhibitor perifosine demonstrates single-agent activity in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma who have failed on vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy. Perifosine is worthy of further investigation in renal cancer, particularly in combination with other molecularly targeted agents.

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      An immunohistochemical signature comprising PTEN, MYC, and Ki67 predicts progression in prostate cancer patients receiving adjuvant docetaxel after prostatectomy (pages 6063–6071)

      Emmanuel S. Antonarakis, Daniel Keizman, Zhe Zhang, Bora Gurel, Tamara L. Lotan, Jessica L. Hicks, Helen L. Fedor, Michael A. Carducci, Angelo M. De Marzo and Mario A. Eisenberger

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27689

      The authors previously conducted a prospective study evaluating adjuvant docetaxel chemotherapy in men with high-risk localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy. After performing immunohistochemical analysis on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from the resected prostate glands of these men, the authors now report that PTEN status, MYC expression, and Ki67 expression are useful predictors of progression in this patient population.

    7. Head and Neck Disease
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      Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy (pages 6072–6078)

      Paul B. Romesser, Jonathan C. Romanyshyn, Karen D. Schupak, Jeremy Setton, Nadeem Riaz, Suzanne L. Wolden, Daphna Y. Gelblum, Eric J. Sherman, Dennis Kraus and Nancy Y. Lee

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27633

      Although prophylactic percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes reduced absolute and percent weight loss and need for hospitalizations in our cohort of patients with oropharyngeal cancer who were undergoing chemoradiation, no differences were noted in radiation treatment duration, toxicity, and overall survival. Prolonged use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy correlated with age greater than 55 years, female sex, and T3/T4 tumors.

    8. Hematologic Malignancies
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      Comparative effectiveness and cost of adding rituximab to first-line chemotherapy for elderly patients diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (pages 6079–6088)

      Robert I. Griffiths, Michelle L. Gleeson, Joseph Mikhael, Martin H. Dreyling and Mark D. Danese

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27638

      In routine clinical practice, the comparative effectiveness of adding rituximab to first-line chemotherapy for elderly patients who are diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is similar to its efficacy as measured in randomized trials. However, the survival benefits observed in this study do not translate into cost offsets or savings as previously reported by several studies in the peer-reviewed literature.

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      Soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) provides a new delivery system for targeted treatment : sCD40L-caspase 3 chimeric protein for treating B-cell malignancies (pages 6089–6104)

      Rotem Kedar, Ofra Sabag, Michal Licthenstein and Haya Lorberboum-Galski

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27654

      Soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) provides a new delivery system for targeted treatment. The sCD40L-caspase 3 chimeric protein efficiently and specifically kills malignant B cells by apoptosis.

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      Ten-year survival after autologous stem cell transplantation for immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (pages 6105–6109)

      Stefan Cordes, Angela Dispenzieri, Martha Q. Lacy, Suzanne R. Hayman, Francis K. Buadi, David Dingli, Shaji K. Kumar, William J. Hogan and Morie A. Gertz

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27660

      Autologous stem cell transplantation can offer durable benefit for patients with immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis. The number of organs involved offers the greatest pretreatment prognostic value, whereas the lowest posttransplantation serum free light chain level offers the best posttreatment prognostic value.

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      Influence of FLT3-internal tandem duplication allele burden and white blood cell count on the outcome in patients with intermediate-risk karyotype acute myeloid leukemia (pages 6110–6117)

      Jonathan How, Jenna Sykes, Vikas Gupta, Karen W. L. Yee, Aaron D. Schimmer, Andre C. Schuh, Mark D. Minden, Suzanne Kamel-Reid and Joseph M. Brandwein

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27683

      In patients with acute myeloid leukemia and intermediate-risk cytogenetics, the white blood cell count at presentation is identified as the only prognostic factor for patients who have mutations in the fms-like tyrosine kinase-3–internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) gene. Correcting for the white blood count, FLT3-ITD allele burden does not correlate with survival.

    12. Hepatobiliary Disease
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      Pilot prognostic model of extremely poor survival among high-risk hepatocellular carcinoma patients (pages 6118–6125)

      Curtis J. Wray, John A. Harvin, Eric J. Silberfein, Tien C. Ko and Lillian S. Kao

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27649

      This pilot model of liver cancer survival may provide additional prognostic information to patients and providers. This information may facilitate informed decisions regarding treatment and associated risk.

    13. Lung Disease
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      A phase 3 study of induction treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy versus chemotherapy before surgery in patients with pathologically confirmed N2 stage IIIA nonsmall cell lung cancer (WJTOG9903) (pages 6126–6135)

      Nobuyuki Katakami, Hirohito Tada, Tetsuya Mitsudomi, Shinzoh Kudoh, Hiroshi Senba, Kaoru Matsui, Hideo Saka, Takayasu Kurata, Yasumasa Nishimura and Masahiro Fukuoka

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26689

      The addition of radiotherapy to induction chemotherapy conferred better local control without adding significant adverse events in patients with stage IIIA (N2) nonsmall cell lung cancer. Tumor downstaging is important for prolonging overall survival.

    14. Melanoma
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      A multi-institution experience comparing the clinical and physiologic differences between upper extremity and lower extremity melphalan-based isolated limb infusion (pages 6136–6143)

      Georgia M. Beasley, Ketan Sharma, Joyce Wong, Mike Miller, Ryan S. Turley, Michael Lidsky, Melanie Masoud, Mark W. Dewhirst, Paul J. Mosca, Jonathan S. Zager and Douglas S. Tyler

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27676

      Although studies of melphalan-based isolated limb infusion (ILI) combine data from upper extremity treatments with data from lower extremity treatments, differences between the 2 may be clinically important. The upper extremity appears to be relatively resistant to the toxic effects of melphalan-based ILI as it is currently performed, suggesting a potential for further optimization of drug dosing for upper extremity ILI.

    15. Discipline

      Clinical Trials
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      Safety, pharmacokinetics, and activity of EZN-2208, a novel conjugate of polyethylene glycol and SN38, in patients with advanced malignancies (pages 6144–6151)

      Razelle Kurzrock, Sanjay Goel, Jennifer Wheler, David Hong, Siqing Fu, Keyvan Rezai, Sonia K. Morgan-Linnell, Saik Urien, Sridhar Mani, Imran Chaudhary, Mohammed H. Ghalib, Aby Buchbinder, François Lokiec and Mary Mulcahy

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27647

      The authors evaluate the tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and activity of EZN-2208, a water-soluble, polyethylene glycol drug conjugate of SN38 (the active moiety of irinotecan), in adult patients with advanced solid tumors. EZN-2208 was well tolerated and produced stable disease for ≥4 months/unconfirmed partial responses in 7 of 39 heavily pretreated patients (18%) with advanced solid tumors, including those who failed on previous irinotecan therapy.

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      AMG 386 in combination with sorafenib in patients with metastatic clear cell carcinoma of the kidney : A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 study (pages 6152–6161)

      Brian Rini, Cezary Szczylik, Nizar M. Tannir, Piotr Koralewski, Piotr Tomczak, Andrzej Deptala, Luc Y. Dirix, Mayer Fishman, Rodryg Ramlau, Alain Ravaud, Wojciech Rogowski, Karolyn Kracht, Yu-Nien Sun, Michael B. Bass, Markus Puhlmann and Bernard Escudier

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27632

      This randomized, controlled study assessed the tolerability and antitumor activity of AMG 386 plus sorafenib in patients with clear cell metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The combination was tolerable but did not significantly improve progression-free survival compared with placebo plus sorafenib.

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      Phase 2 study of everolimus monotherapy in patients with nonfunctioning neuroendocrine tumors or pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas (pages 6162–6170)

      Do-Youn Oh, Tae-Won Kim, Young Suk Park, Sang Joon Shin, Seong Hoon Shin, Eun-Kee Song, Hyo Jin Lee, Kewn-wook Lee and Yung-Jue Bang

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27675

      Everolimus is a promising and well-tolerated agent for treating nonfunctioning neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) regardless of the origin of the primary tumor and demonstrates modest efficacy in the treatment of patients with pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas. The result of the current study support the further study of everolimus in patients with pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas and the incorporation of positron emission tomography in NET studies.

    18. Disparities Research
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      The effect of aging and cancer on the symptom experience and physical function of elderly breast cancer survivors (pages 6171–6178)

      Lanell Bellury, Marjorie A. Pett, Lee Ellington, Susan L. Beck, Jane C. Clark and Kevin D. Stein

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27656

      Findings indicate that physical function in older breast cancer survivors is significantly impacted by social support, emotional status, comorbidities, and symptom bother. These findings support a gero-oncology survivorship paradigm, the need for a conceptually integrated research agenda, and a comprehensive approach to health policy and clinical care for older cancer survivors.

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      Association between insurance and socioeconomic status and risk of advanced stage Hodgkin lymphoma in adolescents and young adults (pages 6179–6187)

      Erlyn C. Smith, Argyrios Ziogas and Hoda Anton-Culver

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27684

      The objective of the current study was to examine the association between possible barriers and characteristics (including gender, socioeconomic status [SES], and insurance status) that may increase the risk of advanced stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) being found at the time of diagnosis in a large cohort of adolescents and young adults. Patients with advanced stage HL were more likely to be males, of Hispanic or black race/ethnicity, foreign born, of lower SES, and uninsured or to have only public health insurance.

    20. Epidemiology
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      Identification of polymorphisms in ultraconserved elements associated with clinical outcomes in locally advanced colorectal adenocarcinoma (pages 6188–6198)

      Moubin Lin, Cathy Eng, Ernest T. Hawk, Maosheng Huang, Jie Lin, Jian Gu, Lee M. Ellis and Xifeng Wu

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27653

      In this study, the authors determine the associations of 48 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within ultraconserved elements—highly conserved genomic sequences that harbor critical biologic functions—with recurrence and survival in patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer stratified by stage. Eight individual, significant SNPs are identified in a testing set, 1 of which is validated in a validation set, and a significant cumulative effect of multiple risk genotypes and gene-gene interactions is observed on recurrence.

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      Prospective study on metabolic factors and risk of prostate cancer (pages 6199–6206)

      Christel Häggström, Tanja Stocks, David Ulmert, Tone Bjørge, Hanno Ulmer, Göran Hallmans, Jonas Manjer, Anders Engeland, Gabriele Nagel, Martin Almqvist, Randi Selmer, Hans Concin, Steinar Tretli, Håkan Jonsson and Pär Stattin

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27677

      There are inconsistent data regarding the association between metabolic factors, separately and combined, and the risk of prostate cancer and death. In the current study, high levels of metabolic factors were not found to be associated with the risk of prostate cancer but were associated with an increased risk of death from the disease.

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      Primary cancers before and after prostate cancer diagnosis (pages 6207–6216)

      Mieke Van Hemelrijck, Linda Drevin, Lars Holmberg, Hans Garmo, Jan Adolfsson and Pär Stattin

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27672

      Approximately 17% of prostate cancers occur in combination with another primary cancer before or after diagnosis. Cancers of the bladder, kidney, and colon are the most frequent. Patients with prostate cancer are and need to be monitored closely for other cancer risks, especially urologic cancers.

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      Influence of health insurance coverage on breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening in rural primary care settings (pages 6217–6225)

      Patricia A. Carney, Jean O'Malley, David I. Buckley, Motomi Mori, David A. Lieberman, Lyle J. Fagnan, James Wallace, Betty Liu and Cynthia Morris

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27635

      Overall, the percentage of patients who are up-to-date for any cancer screening, especially cervical cancer screening, was found to be very low in rural Oregon. Patients with some form of health insurance were more likely to have had a health maintenance visit within the previous 2 years and to be up-to-date for breast, cervical, and/or colorectal cancer screening.

    24. You have free access to this content
      The risk of hepatocellular carcinoma among individuals with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the United States (pages 6226–6233)

      Vikrant V. Sahasrabuddhe, Meredith S. Shiels, Katherine A. McGlynn and Eric A. Engels

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27694

      The risk of hepatocellular carcinoma is elevated almost 4 times in individuals with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome compared with individuals in the general population, and its incidence has increased over time despite improved treatment regimens for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The incidence is greater in older adults, suggesting that this cancer will increase in importance with aging of the HIV-infected population in the United States.

    25. Medical Oncology
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      Gefitinib versus pemetrexed as second-line treatment in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy (KCSG-LU08-01) : An open-label, phase 3 trial (pages 6234–6242)

      Jong-Mu Sun, Ki Hyeong Lee, Sang-we Kim, Dae Ho Lee, Young Joo Min, Hwan Jung Yun, Hoon Kyo Kim, Hong Suk Song, Yeul Hong Kim, Bong-Seog Kim, In Gyu Hwang, Keehyun Lee, Sook Jung Jo, Jae Won Lee, Jin Seok Ahn, Keunchil Park, Myung-Ju Ahn and for the Korean Cancer Study Group (KCSG)

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27630

      This is the first study that directly compares gefitinib with pemetrexed as second-line therapy for nonsmall cell lung cancer in a clinically selected population. Results indicate that gefitinib is superior to pemetrexed in a clinically defined population as well as in subgroups categorized by a molecular marker. This finding could help guide choice of second-line regimen based on clinical characteristics only.

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      Influence of KRAS mutation status in metachronous and synchronous metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma (pages 6243–6252)

      Jeffrey S. Rose, Derek S. Serna, Ludmila Katherine Martin, Xiaobai Li, Lynn M. Weatherby, Sherif Abdel-Misih, Weiqiang Zhao and Tanios Bekaii-Saab

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27666

      The prognostic value of v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) status in colorectal cancer remains poorly understood. In this study, KRAS mutation status does not influence overall survival in either synchronous or metachronous metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma and, as such, has no prognostic role in this disease setting.

    27. Pediatric Oncology
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      Treatment outcome in older patients with childhood acute myeloid leukemia (pages 6253–6259)

      Jeffrey E. Rubnitz, Stanley Pounds, Xueyuan Cao, Laura Jenkins, Gary Dahl, W. Paul Bowman, Jeffrey W Taub, Ching-Hon Pui, Raul C. Ribeiro, Dario Campana and Hiroto Inaba

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27659

      In recent trials, outcomes have improved for children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia. However, treatment-related mortality remains significantly higher for adolescents compared with younger patients.

    28. Psychosocial Oncology
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      How feasible is implementation of distress screening by cancer clinicians in routine clinical care? (pages 6260–6269)

      Alex J. Mitchell, Karen Lord, Jo Slattery, Lorraine Grainger and Paul Symonds

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27648

      In routine clinical settings, cancer clinicians consider distress screening not useful or impractical in approximately 33% of assessments but believe that it promotes good communication or helps with recognition in 50% of assessments.

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      Incorporating information regarding preimplantation genetic diagnosis into discussions concerning testing and risk management for BRCA1/2 mutations : A qualitative study of patient preferences (pages 6270–6277)

      Karen Hurley, Lisa R. Rubin, Allison Werner-Lin, Michal Sagi, Yelena Kemel, Rikki Stern, Aliza Phillips, Ina Cholst, Noah Kauff and Kenneth Offit

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27695

      A total of 33 participants in the current study who were BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and were of reproductive age and had previously undergone genetic counseling viewed a tutorial regarding PGD. The majority of individuals indicated that they preferred to be briefly informed of the availability of information regarding preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), and to receive written materials concerning PGD, but with the option of deferring detailed discussion if they already believed themselves to be overloaded or perceived that PGD was not immediately relevant to their risk management and/or childbearing plans. Providers offering cancer genetic testing can consider indicating that PGD information is available, while attending to the patients' level of interest and ability to absorb information.

    30. Symptom Control and Palliative Care
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      A longitudinal study of pain variability and its correlates in ambulatory patients with advanced stage cancer (pages 6278–6286)

      Junya Zhu, Roger B. Davis, Sherri O. Stuver, Donna L. Berry, Susan Block, Jane C. Weeks and Saul N. Weingart

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27673

      In this longitudinal study of 949 ambulatory patients with advanced stage cancer, minority patients, newly diagnosed patients, patients with head and neck cancer, and patients with moderate or severe pain at baseline were at higher risk of large fluctuations in pain intensity. High pain variability with worsening pain trajectory was associated with an increased risk of death.

    31. Translational Research
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      Impact of internal mammary lymph node drainage identified by preoperative lymphoscintigraphy on outcomes in patients with stage I to III breast cancer (pages 6287–6296)

      Amanda L. Kong, Welela Tereffe, Kelly K. Hunt, Min Yi, Taewoo Kang, Kimberly Weatherspoon, Elizabeth A. Mittendorf, Isabelle Bedrosian, Rosa F. Hwang, Gildy V. Babiera, Thomas A. Buchholz and Funda Meric-Bernstam

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27564

      This study examined whether internal mammary lymph node drainage observed on preoperative lymphoscintigraphy affected outcomes in breast cancer patients. On multivariate analysis, internal mammary drainage was significantly associated with worse distant disease-free survival.

  4. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Errata
    7. Information Item
    1. You have free access to this content
      A difficult detection can influence survival analysis (page 6297)

      Adele Caldarella, Emanuele Crocetti and Eugenio Paci

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27620

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      Reply to a difficult detection can influence survival analysis (pages 6297–6298)

      Mark V. Mishra and Yaacov Richard Lawrence

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27618

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  5. Errata

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Errata
    7. Information Item
    1. You have free access to this content
      Erratum (page 6301)

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27678

      This article corrects:
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      Erratum (page 6301)

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27646

  6. Information Item

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Errata
    7. Information Item
    1. You have free access to this content

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