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Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 119 Issue 22

15 November 2013

Volume 119, Issue 22

Pages 3897–4054

  1. Issue information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Articles
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
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      Issue information (pages i–viii)

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29789

  2. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Articles
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
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      New method to predict DCIS recurrence (page 3899)

      Carrie Printz

      Version of Record online: 4 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28458

  3. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Articles
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
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      Market spiral pricing of cancer drugs (pages 3900–3902)

      Donald W . Light and Hagop Kantarjian

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28321

      High patented cancer drug prices are not related to the high cost of development or to the relative benefit of individual drugs over available ones. Several steps could be implemented to reduce these high prices to more acceptable ones.

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      Cancer drug prices and the free-market forces (pages 3903–3905)

      Hagop Kantarjian and Leonard Zwelling

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28330

      The authors discuss why market forces have not been effective in setting cancer drug prices to reasonable levels. Generic cancer drugs are priced too low, which results in drug shortages. Patented cancer drugs are priced too high, which may be harming patients with cancer and the health care system.

  4. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Articles
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
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      Managing localized prostate cancer in the era of prostate-specific antigen screening (pages 3906–3909)

      James D. Brooks

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28301

      A predictive tool has been developed and validated that identifies patients with low-risk cancer on biopsy who are at risk for upgrading at surgery. This tool could help increase acceptance and safety of active surveillance and lower the number of men overtreated for low-risk prostate cancer.

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      Is pediatric melanoma always malignant? (pages 3910–3913)

      Daniel G. Coit, Marc S. Ernstoff and Klaus J. Busam

      Version of Record online: 10 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28291

      Pediatric melanoma is a rare disease about which there is little agreement as to the accurate diagnosis of borderline lesions or early lymph node metastases. A better understanding of the natural history of this condition will require large centralized registries, consistent histopathologic and cytogenetic review, and long term clinical follow-up.

  5. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Articles
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
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      Integration of cancer genomics with treatment selection: From the genome to predictive biomarkers (pages 3914–3928)

      Thomas J. Ow, Vlad C. Sandulache, Heath D. Skinner and Jeffrey N. Myers

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28304

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      There have been unprecedented advances in genomics and cancer therapeutics in recent times. Advances in predictive biomarkers in cancer depend on efficient and effective integration and application of new data.

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      Multidisciplinary approaches to intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (pages 3929–3942)

      Shishir K. Maithel, T. Clark Gamblin, Ihab Kamel, Celia Pamela Corona-Villalobos, Melanie Thomas and Timothy M. Pawlik

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28312

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      Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is the second most common primary hepatic malignancy. In this review, the authors provide a multidisciplinary appraisal of the current therapeutic approaches to intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

  6. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Articles
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
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      Long-term cardiac safety and outcomes of dose-dense doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel and trastuzumab with and without lapatinib in patients with early breast cancer (pages 3943–3951)

      Patrick G. Morris, Neil M. Iyengar, Sujata Patil, Carol Chen, Alyson Abbruzzi, Robert Lehman, Richard Steingart, Kevin C. Oeffinger, Nancy Lin, Beverley Moy, Steven E. Come, Eric P. Winer, Larry Norton, Clifford A. Hudis and Chau T. Dang

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28284

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      The authors conducted 2 consecutive phase 2 trials for early breast cancer that overexpresses human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) and concluded that, with up to 7 years of follow-up, dose-dense, anthracycline-based chemotherapy can be safely combined with sequential anti-HER2 therapy with acceptable cardiac toxicity. Furthermore, disease control rates in these studies appear to be encouraging.

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      The cumulative risk of false-positive results in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program: Updated results (pages 3952–3958)

      Marta Roman, Rebecca A. Hubbard, Sofie Sebuodegard, Diana L. Miglioretti, Xavier Castells and Solveig Hofvind

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28320

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      In this analysis based on individual-level data from the national breast cancer screening program in Norway, it is estimated that approximately 1 in 5 women undergoing biennial mammography screening between ages 50 years to 69 years will have at least 1 false-positive screening result during those 20 years, and < 5% will undergo an invasive procedure with a benign outcome. The harm of false-positive recalls must be balanced against the goal of maintaining reasonable detection rates.

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      Mammographic screening interval in relation to tumor characteristics and false-positive risk by race/ethnicity and age (pages 3959–3967)

      Ellen S. O'Meara, Weiwei Zhu, Rebecca A. Hubbard, Dejana Braithwaite, Karla Kerlikowske, Kim L. Dittus, Berta Geller, Karen J. Wernli and Diana L. Miglioretti

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28310

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      Biennial versus annual mammographic screening was found to be infrequently associated with an increased risk of adverse breast cancer characteristics, whereas cumulative false-positive risks were lower. However, elevated risks of late-stage disease in Hispanic women and lymph node-positive disease in younger Asian women who were screened less often than annually warrant consideration and replication.

    4. Chest and Lung Disease
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      Native and rearranged ALK copy number and rearranged cell count in non–small cell lung cancer: Implications for ALK inhibitor therapy (pages 3968–3975)

      D. Ross Camidge, Margaret Skokan, Porntip Kiatsimkul, Barbara Helfrich, Xian Lu, Anna E. Barón, Nathan Schulte, DeLee Maxson, Dara L. Aisner, Wilbur A. Franklin, Robert C. Doebele and Marileila Varella-Garcia

      Version of Record online: 10 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28311

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      Florescence in situ hybridization analysis is used to define non-small cell lung cancer as anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive if a rearrangement is detected in at least 15% of tumor cells. Cases with borderline frequencies up to this threshold and with atypical patterns, such as partial and complete duplication and focal amplification of native ALK amplification, also exist that should be explored with additional ALK diagnostic techniques.

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      The National Lung Screening Trial: Results stratified by demographics, smoking history, and lung cancer histology (pages 3976–3983)

      Paul F. Pinsky, Timothy R. Church, Grant Izmirlian and Barnett S. Kramer

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28326

      The benefit of computed tomography screening in the National Lung Screening Trial did not vary substantially by age or smoking status; there was weak evidence of a differential benefit by sex. A differential benefit across lung cancer histologies may exist.

    6. Gastrointestinal Disease
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      Clinical significance of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood from patients with gastric cancer (pages 3984–3991)

      Yoshikazu Uenosono, Takaaki Arigami, Tsutomu Kozono, Shigehiro Yanagita, Takahiko Hagihara, Naoto Haraguchi, Daisuke Matsushita, Munetsugu Hirata, Hideo Arima, Yawara Funasako, Yuko Kijima, Akihiro Nakajo, Hiroshi Okumura, Sumiya Ishigami, Shuichi Hokita, Shinichi Ueno and Shoji Natsugoe

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28309

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      The impact of enumerating circulating tumor cells is evaluated in the prognosis of 265 patients with gastric cancer. The evaluation of circulating tumor cells may be a useful tool for management of gastric cancer.

    7. Genitourinary Disease
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      Development and multi-institutional validation of an upgrading risk tool for Gleason 6 prostate cancer (pages 3992–4002)

      Matthew Truong, Jon A. Slezak, Chee Paul Lin, Viacheslav Iremashvili, Martins Sado, Aria A. Razmaria, Glen Leverson, Mark S. Soloway, Scott E. Eggener, E. Jason Abel, Tracy M. Downs and David F. Jarrard

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28303

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      A novel nomogram was developed and externally validated at multiple centers for predicting Gleason score upgrading at radical prostatectomy, for use in patients with Gleason 6 prostate cancer on biopsy. This nomogram may be used in counseling patients regarding their management options.

    8. Head and Neck Disease
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      Overexpression of caldesmon is associated with lymph node metastasis and poorer prognosis in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (pages 4003–4011)

      Kai-Ping Chang, Chih-Lueh Albert Wang, Huang-Kai Kao, Ying Liang, Shiau-Chin Liu, Ling-Ling Huang, Chuen Hseuh, Ya-Ju Hsieh, Kun-Yi Chien, Yu-Sun Chang, Jau-Song Yu and Lang-Ming Chi

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28300

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      High rates of expression of caldesmon (CaD) are associated with several clinicopathological manifestations in terms of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tumor progression and metastasis and poorer prognosis after treatment. In vitro suppression, rescue, and overexpression of CaD in OSCC cells demonstrated that CaD promotes migration and invasive processes in these cells.

    9. Melanoma
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      Pediatric melanoma: Analysis of an international registry (pages 4012–4019)

      Bruce J. Averbook, Sandra J. Lee, Keith A. Delman, Kenneth W. Gow, Jonathan S. Zager, Vernon K. Sondak, Jane L. Messina, Michael S. Sabel, Mark R. Pittelkow, Phillip M. Ecker, Svetomir N. Markovic, Susan M. Swetter, Sancy A. Leachman, Alessandro Testori, Clara Curiel-Lewandrowski, Ronald S. Go, Drazen M. Jukic and John M. Kirkwood

      Version of Record online: 10 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28289

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      In an international, multicenter, pediatric melanoma registry, tumor thickness, ulceration, lymph node status, and patient age were found to be significant predictors of survival, similar to adult melanoma. There was a trend toward increased survival in children aged ≤ 10 years compared with adolescents aged > 10 years. Additional analyses are warranted to examine the potential biological and behavioral differences in pediatric versus adult melanoma.

    10. Discipline

      Disparities Research
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      Incidence and prognosis of gastroesophageal cancer in rural, urban, and metropolitan areas of the United States (pages 4020–4027)

      Zhensheng Wang, Michael Goodman, Nabil Saba and Bassel F. El-Rayes

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28313

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      Cancers located in gastroesophageal sites are expected to have different incidence and outcomes based on the patient's area of residence. The results from this study suggest that the preconceptions about urban/rural disparities in relation to gastroesophageal cancers in the United States are either unwarranted or out of date.

    11. Epidemiology
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      Clinical effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine among adult cancer patients (pages 4028–4035)

      Inbal Vinograd, Noa Eliakim-Raz, Laura Farbman, Rina Baslo, Ahmed Taha, Ali Sakhnini, Adi Lador, Salomon M. Stemmer, Anat Gafter-Gvili, Leonard Leibovici and Mical Paul

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28351

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      In this observational, prospective study, influenza vaccine does not reduce respiratory infections in patients with cancer, but mortality is lower in vaccinated patients than in unvaccinated patients. The data from this study are in favor of a serious effort to increase the rate of influenza vaccination in immune-suppressed cancer patients.

    12. Pediatric Oncology
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      Gemtuzumab ozogamicin can reduce minimal residual disease in patients with childhood acute myeloid leukemia (pages 4036–4043)

      Carol O'Hear, Hiroto Inaba, Stanley Pounds, Lei Shi, Gary Dahl, W. Paul Bowman, Jeffrey W. Taub, Ching-Hon Pui, Raul C. Ribeiro, Elaine Coustan-Smith, Dario Campana and Jeffrey E. Rubnitz

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28334

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      The addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) to standard chemotherapy has recently been demonstrated to improve the outcome of specific subgroups of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, the authors demonstrate that GO is also effective in reducing minimal residual disease in patients with AML.

    13. Psychosocial Oncology
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      To preserve or not to preserve: How difficult is the decision about fertility preservation? (pages 4044–4050)

      Jennifer E. Mersereau, Linnea R. Goodman, Allison M. Deal, Jessica R. Gorman, Brian W. Whitcomb and H. Irene Su

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28317

      This study examined potentially modifiable risk factors associated with decisional conflict related to fertility preservation choices. Increasing fertility preservation consultation referrals and access to treatment may decrease decisional conflict.

  7. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Articles
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
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      Reply to subgroup analysis comment on amiodarone and the risk of cancer (page 4052)

      Vincent Yi-Fong Su, Yu-Wen Hu and Chia-Jen Liu

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28265

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