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Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 119 Issue 24

15 December 2013

Volume 119, Issue 24

Pages 4213–4378

  1. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Erratum
    7. Information Item
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  2. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Erratum
    7. Information Item
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      Which of these things is not like the others? (pages 4216–4222)

      Jay S. Kaufman and Richard F. MacLehose

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28359

      Many published reports in cancer epidemiology assert subgroup-specific effects without adequate justification. Heterogeneity tests play an important role in justifying claims that an exposure has an effect only on one or another subgroup.

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Erratum: Kaufman JS and MacLehose RF. Which of these things is not like the others? Cancer doi: 10.1002/cncr.28359

      Vol. 120, Issue 6, 926, Article first published online: 2 DEC 2013

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Erratum
    7. Information Item
    1. Disease Site

      Gastrointestinal Disease
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      Randomized phase 2 study of pegylated SN-38 (EZN-2208) or irinotecan plus cetuximab in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (pages 4223–4230)

      Christopher R. Garrett, Tanios S. Bekaii-Saab, Theresa Ryan, George A. Fisher, Sally Clive, Petr Kavan, Einat Shacham-Shmueli, Aby Buchbinder and Richard M. Goldberg

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28358

      The pegylated formulation of the active moiety of irinotecan SN-38 (10-hydroxy-7-ethyl-camptothecin), called EZN-2208, when used in combination with cetuximab in patients with metastatic KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer, is well tolerated; in a randomized phase 2 study, treatment with EZN-2208 plus cetuximab is not associated with improved progression-free survival compared with irinotecan plus cetuximab. Objective radiographic responses are not observed in EZN-2208-treated patients with metastatic, KRAS-mutant colorectal cancer who received prior irinotecan chemotherapy.

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      Quantified pathologic response assessed as residual tumor burden is a predictor of recurrence-free survival in patients with rectal cancer who undergo resection after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (pages 4231–4241)

      Atin Agarwal, George J. Chang, Chung-Yuan Hu, Melissa Taggart, Asif Rashid, In J. Park, Y. Nancy You, Prajnan Das, Sunil Krishnan, Christopher H. Crane, Miguel Rodriguez-Bigas, John Skibber, Lee Ellis, Cathy Eng, Scott Kopetz and Dipen M. Maru

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28331

      The quantified pathologic response assessed as the percentage of residual tumor cells is a predictor of recurrence-free survival in patients with rectal cancer and stratifies patients with high pathologic stage disease. Patients with a complete or near-complete response have a low risk of disease recurrence. These findings have potential implications for prognosis and treatment strategies that rely on pathologic response to chemoradiotherapy.

    3. Head and Neck Disease
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      Improvement in survival of patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: An international collaborative study (pages 4242–4248)

      Moran Amit, Tzu-Chen Yen, Chun-Ta Liao, Pankaj Chaturvedi, Jai Prakash Agarwal, Luiz P. Kowalski, Ardalan Ebrahimi, Jonathan R. Clark, Matthias Kreppel, Joachim Zöller, Eran Fridman, Villaret A. Bolzoni, Jatin P. Shah, Yoav Binenbaum, Snehal G. Patel, Ziv Gil and The International Consortium for Outcome Research (ICOR) in Head and Neck Cancer

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28357

      The survival rate of patients with oral cavity cancer has improved significantly during the past 2 decades despite higher stage disease, and a higher rate of distant metastases. The decade of treatment is identified as an independent prognostic factor for outcome with a hazard ratio of 0.42 for cancer-specific mortality.

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      Identification of FOXM1-induced epigenetic markers for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (pages 4249–4258)

      Sungjae Hwang, Swarna Mahadevan, Fatima Qadir, Iain L. Hutchison, Daniela Elena Costea, Evelyn Neppelberg, Per Gunnar Liavaag, Ahmad Waseem and Muy-Teck Teh

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28354

      Epigenetic reprogramming is thought to induce oncogenesis. This study validated epigenetic markers that could be clinically exploited as biomarkers for early precancer screening of head and neck cancer.

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      Histone modification patterns correlate with patient outcome in oral squamous cell carcinoma (pages 4259–4267)

      Ya-Wei Chen, Shou-Yen Kao, Hsiao-Jung Wang and Muh-Hwa Yang

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28356

      Low H3K4ac and high H3K27me3 are associated with advanced stage and poor prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma. The results demonstrate the potential prognostic utility of global histone modification analysis for oral squamous cell carcinoma.

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      Phase 1b, multicenter, single blinded, placebo-controlled, sequential dose escalation study to assess the safety and tolerability of topically applied AG013 in subjects with locally advanced head and neck cancer receiving induction chemotherapy (pages 4268–4276)

      Sewanti Atul Limaye, Robert I. Haddad, Fiona Cilli, Stephen T. Sonis, A. Dimitrios Colevas, Michael T. Brennan, Kenneth S. Hu and Barbara A. Murphy

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28365

      An oral rinse formulation of AG013 containing recombinant Lactococcus lactis secreting the mucosal protectant human Trefoil Factor 1 (hTFF1) was evaluated in a phase 1b study in subjects with locally advanced head and neck cancer who were receiving induction chemotherapy with cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil with or without docetaxel. AG013 rinse was found to be safe and tolerable with preliminary efficacy data warranting further study.

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      Short telomere lengths in peripheral blood leukocytes are associated with an increased risk of oral premalignant lesion and oral squamous cell carcinoma (pages 4277–4283)

      Da-Tian Bau, Scott M. Lippman, Enping Xu, Yilei Gong, J. Jack Lee, Xifeng Wu and Jian Gu

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28367

      This is the first study to evaluate leukocyte telomere length (LTL) in relation to oral premalignant lesions and oral squamous cell carcinoma. The data indicate that short LTL is associated with an increased risk of developing both oral premalignant lesions and oral squamous cell carcinoma, and short LTL also may predispose patients to progression of oral premalignant lesions.

    8. Hematologic Malignancies
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      Tolerability and efficacy of pegylated interferon-α-2a in combination with imatinib for patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (pages 4284–4289)

      Hyacinthe Johnson-Ansah, Joelle Guilhot, Philippe Rousselot, Delphine Rea, Laurence Legros, Françoise Rigal-Huguet, Franck Emmanuel Nicolini, François-Xavier Mahon, Claude Preudhomme and François Guilhot

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28328

      The pegylated form of interferon-α-2a (PegIFNa2a) in combination with imatinib has demonstrated a molecular improvement in patients in chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia. Reducing the dose of PegIFNa2a from 90 μg per week to 45 μg per week was found to improve the tolerability and preserve the molecular responses.

    9. Discipline

      Clinical Trials
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      TRAIL receptor agonist conatumumab with modified FOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab for first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer : A randomized phase 1b/2 trial (pages 4290–4298)

      Charles S. Fuchs, Marwan Fakih, Lee Schwartzberg, Allen L. Cohn, Lorrin Yee, Luke Dreisbach, Mark F. Kozloff, Yong-jiang Hei, Francesco Galimi, Yang Pan, Vincent Haddad, Cheng-Pang Hsu, Antony Sabin and Leonard Saltz

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28353

      In this phase 1b/randomized phase 2 trial of conatumumab with mFOLFOX6/bevacizumab for first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer, conatumumab had a manageable toxicity profile but did not significantly improve progression-free survival or overall survival compared with placebo. These data do not support further development of conatumumab in advanced colorectal cancer.

    10. Outcomes Research
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      Cost effectiveness of proton therapy compared with photon therapy in the management of pediatric medulloblastoma (pages 4299–4307)

      Raymond B. Mailhot Vega, Jane Kim, Marc Bussière, Jona Hattangadi, Abby Hollander, Jeff Michalski, Nancy J. Tarbell, Torunn Yock and Shannon M. MacDonald

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28322

      Results from a base-case analysis demonstrate that proton therapy is associated with higher quality-adjusted life years and lower costs; thus, it dominates photon therapy. By using current risk estimates and data on required capital investments, proton therapy is a cost-effective strategy for the management of pediatric patients with medulloblastoma compared with standard of care photon therapy.

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      Treatment trade-offs in myeloma: A survey of consecutive patients about contemporary maintenance strategies (pages 4308–4315)

      Brian L. Burnette, Angela Dispenzieri, Shaji Kumar, Ann M. Harris, Jeff A. Sloan, Jon C. Tilburt, Robert A. Kyle and S. Vincent Rajkumar

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28340

      In a large survey of consecutive patients with multiple myeloma, there is a wide range of perspectives regarding maintenance therapy in terms of accepting toxicity and expectation of benefit. With such information, it is imperative to have detailed discussions with patients to optimally personalize care.

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      Use of imaging and biomarker tests for posttreatment care of early-stage breast cancer survivors (pages 4316–4324)

      Erin E. Hahn, Ron D. Hays, Katherine L. Kahn, Mark S. Litwin and Patricia A. Ganz

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28363

      Despite the recent emphasis on reducing unnecessary care for cancer survivors, many breast cancer survivors are receiving nonrecommended, and potentially harmful, posttreatment services for surveillance purposes. In addition, recommended posttreatment mammograms remain underused, and many breast cancer survivors do not receive a mammogram within 2 years after the cessation of active treatment.

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      Rebiopsy of non–small cell lung cancer patients with acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor : Comparison between T790M mutation-positive and mutation-negative populations (pages 4325–4332)

      Akito Hata, Nobuyuki Katakami, Hiroshige Yoshioka, Jumpei Takeshita, Kosuke Tanaka, Shigeki Nanjo, Shiro Fujita, Reiko Kaji, Yukihiro Imai, Kazuya Monden, Takeshi Matsumoto, Kazuma Nagata, Kyoko Otsuka, Ryo Tachikawa, Keisuke Tomii, Kei Kunimasa, Masahiro Iwasaku, Akihiro Nishiyama, Tadashi Ishida and Yoshihiro Nishimura

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28364

      Rebiopsy to confirm T790M status can be challenging due to limited tissue availability and procedural feasibility, and little is known regarding the differences among patients with or without T790M. Results of this study demonstrated low prevalence of T790M in central nervous system and prognostic impact of T790M after acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

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      The symptom burden of cancer: Evidence for a core set of cancer-related and treatment-related symptoms from the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Symptom Outcomes and Practice Patterns study (pages 4333–4340)

      Charles S. Cleeland, Fengmin Zhao, Victor T. Chang, Jeff A. Sloan, Ann M. O'Mara, Paul B. Gilman, Matthias Weiss, Tito R. Mendoza, Ju-Whei Lee and Michael J. Fisch

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28376

      Using data from a multicenter study, the authors assessed the effects of cancer site and clinical variables on the percentages of patients rating common cancer-related symptoms as moderate to severe. Assessing a core symptom set should enhance clinical care, quality of care, and evaluation of treatment benefit and progression-free survival as trial outcomes.

    15. Pediatric Oncology
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      Li-Fraumeni and Li-Fraumeni—like syndrome among children diagnosed with pediatric cancer in Southern Brazil (pages 4341–4349)

      Juliana Giacomazzi, Simone G. Selistre, Cristina Rossi, Barbara Alemar, Patricia Santos-Silva, Fernando S. Pereira, Cristina B. Netto, Silvia L. Cossio, Daniela E. Roth, Algemir L. Brunetto, Marcelo Zagonel-Oliveira, Ghyslaine Martel-Planche, Jose R. Goldim, Pierre Hainaut, Suzi A. Camey and Patricia Ashton-Prolla

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28346

      In southern Brazil, the TP53 p.R337H mutation is prevalent among children with adrenocortical and choroid plexus carcinomas. A significant percentage (25%) of children with cancer in the current series had a cancer family history fulfilling criteria for Li-Fraumeni–like syndrome and required referral for genetic risk assessment.

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      Morbidity in survivors of child and adolescent meningioma (pages 4350–4357)

      Rishi S. Kotecha, Peter Jacoby, Catherine H. Cole and Nicholas G. Gottardo

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28366

      Morbidity in survivors of child and adolescent meningioma is favorable compared to adults, with an increased risk of morbidity occurring in children and adolescents with relapsed disease. Morbidity predominantly occurs as a consequence of the meningioma itself, justifying aggressive surgery to achieve gross total resection, with caveats being patients who have neurofibromatosis and skull base tumors.

    17. Translational Research
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      MicroRNA-222 and MicroRNA-146b are tissue and circulating biomarkers of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer (pages 4358–4365)

      James C. Lee, Jing Ting Zhao, Roderick J. Clifton-Bligh, Anthony Gill, Justin S. Gundara, Julian C. Ip, Anthony Glover, Mark S. Sywak, Leigh W. Delbridge, Bruce G. Robinson and Stanley B. Sidhu

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28254

      MicroRNA-222 and microRNA-146b are over-expressed in papillary thyroid cancers associated with recurrence and in the circulation of patients before papillary thyroid cancer surgery. Therefore, they are tissue markers of the risk of recurrence and potential circulating tumor markers of recurrence.

  4. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Erratum
    7. Information Item
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    2. You have free access to this content
  5. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Erratum
    7. Information Item
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  6. Information Item

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    6. Erratum
    7. Information Item
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