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Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 119 Issue 7

1 April 2013

Volume 119, Issue 7

Pages 1291–1446

  1. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
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  2. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
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      Is 20% of a loaf enough? (pages 1294–1297)

      Larry Kessler

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27811

      As a result of recent successful studies on lung cancer screening, it was learned that approximately 12,000 deaths can be averted if screening is implemented among the entire screening-eligible population. A variety of considerations make this finding important, although it is not clear that clinicians are ready for a policy change concerning cancer screening.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
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      Navigating Latinas with breast screen abnormalities to diagnosis : The Six Cities Study (pages 1298–1305)

      Amelie G. Ramirez, Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, Frank J. Penedo, Gregory A. Talavera, J. Emilio Carrillo, Maria E. Fernandez, Alan E. C. Holden, Edgar Munoz, Sandra San Miguel and Kip Gallion

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27912

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      Patient-centered navigation to assist Latina women with abnormal screening mammograms appears to reduce the time to diagnosis and increase rates of timely diagnosis overall. However, results from stratified analysis indicate that only navigated Latinas with an initial Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) screening result of BI-RADS-3 are diagnosed more quickly and more often within 30 or 60 days of mammogram abnormality detection.

    2. Chest and Lung Disease
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      Examining whether lung screening changes risk perceptions: National Lung Screening Trial participants at 1-year follow-up (pages 1306–1313)

      Elyse R. Park, Ilana F. Gareen, Amanda Jain, Jamie S. Ostroff, Fenghai Duan, JoRean D. Sicks, William Rakowski, Michael Diefenbach and Nancy A. Rigotti

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27925

      Overall, lung screening does not significantly change risk perceptions for lung cancer or smoking-related disease. The authors recommend that tobacco risk communication and cessation become an integral part of the lung screening process.

    3. Gastrointestinal Disease
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      Antioxidant intake and pancreatic cancer risk : The Vitamins and Lifestyle (VITAL) Study (pages 1314–1320)

      Xuesong Han, Jingjing Li, Theodore M. Brasky, Pengcheng Xun, June Stevens, Emily White, Marilie D. Gammon and Ka He

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27936

      Dietary selenium intake is inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. The observed association is attenuated by selenium supplementation.

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      Inhibition of farnesoid X receptor controls esophageal cancer cell growth in vitro and in nude mouse xenografts (pages 1321–1329)

      Baoxiang Guan, Hao Li, Zhengduo Yang, Ashraful Hoque and Xiaochun Xu

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27910

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      Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is overexpressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma tissues, and inhibition of FXR suppresses tumor cell viability by inducing apoptosis in vitro and reduces tumor formation and growth in nude mouse xenografts. FXR also mediates the effects of bile acids on the expression of cell growth-related genes in esophageal cancer cells.

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      The superiority of the seventh edition of the TNM classification depends on the overall survival of the patient cohort : Comparative analysis of the sixth and seventh TNM editions in patients with gastric cancer from Japan and the United Kingdom (pages 1330–1337)

      Tsutomu Hayashi, Takaki Yoshikawa, Kiran Bonam, Henry M. Sue-Ling, Masataka Taguri, Satoshi Morita, Akira Tsuburaya, Jeremy D. Hayden and Heike I. Grabsch

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27928

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      The seventh edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union Against Cancer TNM classification (TNM7) demonstrates superior discriminatory ability compared with the sixth edition in 2 cohorts (a Japanese cohort and a United Kingdom cohort) of patients with gastric cancer. When using TNM7, the improvement in the ability to discriminate patients with different survival probability is greater in the United Kingdom cohort than in the Japanese cohort.

    6. Genitourinary Disease
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      Association between exercise and primary incidence of prostate cancer : Does race matter? (pages 1338–1343)

      Abhay A. Singh, Lee W. Jones, Jodi A. Antonelli, Leah Gerber, Elizabeth E. Calloway, Kathleen H. Shuler, Stephen J. Freedland, Delores J. Grant, Cathrine Hoyo and Lionel L. Bañez

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27791

      In a prospective cohort of men undergoing biopsy, an increased amount of exercise was associated with a risk reduction for prostate cancer in white men but not black men. White men who exercised ≥ 9 metabolic equivalent (MET) hours per week were less likely to have a positive biopsy compared with men exercising < 9 MET hours per week (odds ratio, 0.47; P = .047).

    7. Gynecologic Oncology
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      Risk of metachronous breast cancer after BRCA mutation–associated ovarian cancer (pages 1344–1348)

      Susan M. Domchek, Komal Jhaveri, Sujata Patil, Jill E. Stopfer, Clifford Hudis, Jacquelyn Powers, Zsofia Stadler, Laura Goldstein, Noah Kauff, Mustafa Khasraw, Kenneth Offit, Katherine L. Nathanson and Mark Robson

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27842

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      The risk of breast cancer after BRCA (breast cancer, early onset) mutation–associated breast cancer does not justify a surgical approach to prevention in women with this mutation. Survival is dominated by ovarian cancer deaths.

    8. Head and Neck Disease
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      Impact of positron emission tomography/computed tomography surveillance at 12 and 24 months for detecting head and neck cancer recurrence (pages 1349–1356)

      Allen S. Ho, Gabriel J. Tsao, Frank W. Chen, Tianjie Shen, Michael J. Kaplan, A. Dimitrios Colevas, Nancy J. Fischbein, Andrew Quon, Quynh-Thu Le, Harlan A. Pinto, Willard E. Fee Jr, John B. Sunwoo, Davud Sirjani, Wendy Hara and Mike Yao

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27892

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      Surveillance 12- and 24-month post-treatment positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans are of limited yield in head and neck cancer patients with negative 3-month imaging. No survival differences are observed between PET/CT-detected and clinically detected recurrences.

    9. Discipline

      Clinical Trials
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      Feasibility and safety of sequential research-related tumor core biopsies in clinical trials (pages 1357–1364)

      Jung-min Lee, John L. Hays, Anne M. Noonan, Jennifer Squires, Lori Minasian, Christina Annunziata, Bradford J. Wood, Minshu Yu, Katherine R. Calvo, Nicole Houston, Nilofer Azad and Elise C. Kohn

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27916

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      Good-quality, sequential, percutaneous core-needle biopsies can be obtained safely in patients who are receiving targeted therapies. Obesity, depth of lesion, and concomitant receipt of antiangiogenic agents do not increase the risk or reduce the successful acquisition of useful tissue.

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      AMIGAS: A multicity, multicomponent cervical cancer prevention trial among Mexican American women (pages 1365–1372)

      Theresa L. Byrd, Katherine M. Wilson, Judith Lee Smith, Gloria Coronado, Sally W. Vernon, Maria Eugenia Fernandez-Esquer, Beti Thompson, Melchor Ortiz, David Lairson and Maria E. Fernandez

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27926

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      In the AMIGAS (Ayudando a las Mujeres con Informacion, Guia, y Amor para su Salud [helping women with information, guidance, and love for their health]) trial, women in any of 3 intervention arms are statistically significantly more likely to report being screened than those in the usual care group in both an intent-to-treat analysis and a per-protocol analysis. AMIGAS is effective in increasing Papanicolaou test screening in women of Mexican descent when used in a 1-to-1 setting.

    11. Disparities Research
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      The risk of developing invasive breast cancer in Hispanic women : A look across Hispanic subgroups (pages 1373–1380)

      Matthew P. Banegas, Mei Leng, Barry I. Graubard and Leo S. Morales

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27896

      Findings from this study indicate that Hispanic women have a significantly lower risk of breast cancer compared with non-Hispanic white women, and that breast cancer risk significantly differs between specific Hispanic subgroups, based on the Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT). Approximately 2.6% of Hispanic women, ranging from 1% of Central/South Americans to 3.7% of Puerto Ricans, are at high risk for breast cancer (BCRAT 5-year risk ≥1.67%) and may be eligible for prophylactic breast cancer chemoprevention.

    12. Epidemiology
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      Annual number of lung cancer deaths potentially avertable by screening in the United States (pages 1381–1385)

      Jiemin Ma, Elizabeth M. Ward, Robert Smith and Ahmedin Jemal

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27813

      In 2010, approximately 8.6 million Americans were eligible for low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for lung cancer according to the criteria used in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). Approximately 12,000 lung cancer deaths could potentially be averted in the United States each year if LDCT screening is fully implemented among the entire screening-eligible population following the screening protocol and regimens adopted in the NLST.

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      Human papillomavirus vaccine uptake among 18- to 26-year-old women in the United States : National Health Interview Survey, 2010 (pages 1386–1392)

      Tabassum H. Laz, Mahbubur Rahman and Abbey B. Berenson

      Article first published online: 26 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27894

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      One in 8 young adult women complete 3 doses of the human papillomavirus vaccine. Educational and vaccine financing programs are needed to improve vaccine uptake.

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      An aggregated analysis of hormonal factors and endometrial cancer risk by parity (pages 1393–1401)

      Sara J. Schonfeld, Patricia Hartge, Ruth M. Pfeiffer, D. Michal Freedman, Robert T. Greenlee, Martha S. Linet, Yikyung Park, Catherine Schairer, Kala Visvanathan and James V. Lacey Jr.

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27909

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      The results from this large pooled analysis of data from 4 large prospective studies suggest that nulliparity, which is an established endometrial cancer risk factor, does not modify the risks associated with other hormone-related risk factors.

    15. Outcomes Research
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      Survival after lumpectomy and mastectomy for early stage invasive breast cancer : The effect of age and hormone receptor status (pages 1402–1411)

      E. Shelley Hwang, Daphne Y. Lichtensztajn, Scarlett Lin Gomez, Barbara Fowble and Christina A. Clarke

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27795

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      Among patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer in a large statewide cancer registry, breast-conserving therapy was associated with improved disease-specific survival compared to mastectomy; this benefit was greater among women age ≥ 50 with hormone receptor (HR)-positive disease (hazard ratio =–0.86, 95% confidence interval =–0.82-0.91) than among women age < 50 with HR-negative disease (hazard ratio =–0.88, 95% confidence interval =–0.79-0.98). These data provide confidence that breast-conserving therapy remains an effective alternative to mastectomy for early-stage disease, regardless of age or HR status.

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      Effect of including cancer-specific variables on models examining short-term outcomes (pages 1412–1419)

      Ryan P. Merkow, Thomas E. Kmiecik, David J. Bentrem, David P. Winchester, Andrew K. Stewart, Clifford Y. Ko and Karl Y. Bilimoria

      Article first published online: 26 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27891

      Increasing numbers of studies are using American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data to study cancer surgery, but it is unknown whether the addition of cancer-specific variables improves the modeling of short-term outcomes. The current results indicate that, although advanced disease stage and neoadjuvant therapy variables are predictors of short-term outcomes, their inclusion does not improve the models.

    17. Psychosocial Oncology
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      Predictors of smoking relapse in patients with thoracic cancer or head and neck cancer (pages 1420–1427)

      Vani Nath Simmons, Erika B. Litvin, Paul B. Jacobsen, Riddhi D. Patel, Judith C. McCaffrey, Jason A. Oliver, Steven K. Sutton and Thomas H. Brandon

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27880

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      Despite the increased need and motivation of patients with cancer to quit smoking, findings suggest substantial smoking relapse rates after surgery. This longitudinal study identified several modifiable variables to target in future smoking relapse-prevention interventions for patients with cancer.

    18. Supportive Care
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      Adherence to national guidelines for antiemesis prophylaxis in patients undergoing chemotherapy for lung cancer : A population-based study (pages 1428–1436)

      Daniel R. Gomez, Kai-Ping Liao, Sharon Giordano, Hoang Nguyen, Benjamin D. Smith and Linda S. Elting

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27899

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      Adherence to antiemetic prophylaxis for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting can have a significant impact on clinical and economic outcomes. The authors use a population database both to assess the rate of adherence to antiemetic prophylaxis in patients with lung cancer and to determine the factors that predict for improved compliance.

    19. Symptom Control and Palliative Care
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      A Web-based communication aid for patients with cancer : The CONNECT Study (pages 1437–1445)

      Neal J. Meropol, Brian L. Egleston, Joanne S. Buzaglo, Andrew Balshem, Al B. Benson III, Donald J. Cegala, Roger B. Cohen, Michael Collins, Michael A. Diefenbach, Suzanne M. Miller, Linda Fleisher, Jennifer L. Millard, Eric A. Ross, Kevin A. Schulman, Allison Silver, Elyse Slater, Nicholas Solarino, Daniel P. Sulmasy, Jonathan Trinastic and Kevin P. Weinfurt

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27874

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      CONNECT is a computer-based tool to provide communication skills training to cancer patients. In a prospective randomized clinical trial, patients assigned to CONNECT reported improved satisfaction with physician communication and improved decision making when compared to those patients who did not receive online skills training.

  4. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Editorials
    4. Original Articles
    5. Correspondence
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