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Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 119 Issue 8

15 April 2013

Volume 119, Issue 8

Pages 1447–1604

  1. Issue information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Erratum
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      Issue information (pages i–vii)

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29967

  2. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Erratum
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    3. You have free access to this content
  3. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Erratum
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      A note from history: Landmarks in history of cancer, part 5 (pages 1450–1466)

      Steven I. Hajdu and Farbod Darvishian

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27889

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      Major events and discoveries in cancer research, diagnosis, and treatment that took place between 1910 and 1940 are reviewed.

  4. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Erratum
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      Diagnostic assays for identification of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non–small cell lung cancer (pages 1467–1477)

      Andrew J. Weickhardt, Dara L. Aisner, Wilbur A. Franklin, Marileila Varella-Garcia, Robert C. Doebele and D. Ross Camidge

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27913

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      There is a range of diagnostic tests for the detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements in non–small cell lung cancer, and each test has its own benefits and weaknesses. In this review, the authors summarize ALK testing methodologies for clinicians and pathologists.

  5. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Erratum
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
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      Incident malignancies among older long-term breast cancer survivors and an age-matched and site-matched nonbreast cancer comparison group over 10 years of follow-up (pages 1478–1485)

      Kerri M. Clough-Gorr, Soe Soe Thwin, Jaclyn L. F. Bosco, Rebecca A. Silliman, Diana S. M. Buist, Pamala A. Pawloski, Virginia P. Quinn and Marianne N. Prout

      Article first published online: 26 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27914

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      The authors examine incident malignancies in a cohort of older breast cancer survivors and a comparison group of women in long-term follow-up (6-15 years) after a breast cancer diagnosis. The results indicate that older women who survive for 5 years after an early stage breast cancer diagnosis are not at elevated risk for developing subsequent incident malignancies up to 15 years after their breast cancer diagnosis.

    2. Chest and Lung Disease
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      KIF5B-RET fusions in Chinese patients with non–small cell lung cancer (pages 1486–1494)

      Weijing Cai, Chunxia Su, Xuefei Li, Lihong Fan, Limou Zheng, Ke Fei and Caicun Zhou

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27940

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      KIF5B-RET fusions (fusions of the ret proto-oncogene [RET] and kinesin family member 5B [KIF5B] genes) occur in approximately 1.5% of Chinese patients with non–small cell lung cancer and were first identified in squamous cell carcinoma and low-grade malignant neuroendocrine tumor.

    3. Endocrine Disease
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      Preoperative BRAF(V600E) mutation screening is unlikely to alter initial surgical treatment of patients with indeterminate thyroid nodules : A prospective case series of 960 patients (pages 1495–1502)

      David A. Kleiman, Matthew J. Sporn, Toni Beninato, Michael J. Crowley, Anvy Nguyen, Alessia Uccelli, Theresa Scognamiglio, Rasa Zarnegar and Thomas J. Fahey III

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27888

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      The B-type Raf kinase Val600Glu mutation, or BRAF(V600E), is most common in indeterminate thyroid nodules with other cytologic risk factors for malignancy which already warrant a total thyroidectomy. Therefore, single mutation screening for BRAF(V600E) does not meaningfully improve preoperative risk stratification and is unlikely to alter the initial management of patients with indeterminate nodules.

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      Soluble FAS ligand as a biomarker of disease recurrence in differentiated thyroid cancer (pages 1503–1511)

      Taofeek K. Owonikoko, Mohammad S. Hossain, Chandar Bhimani, Zhengjia Chen, Sungjin Kim, Suresh S. Ramalingam, Shi-Yong Sun, Dong M. Shin, Edmund K. Waller and Fadlo R. Khuri

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27937

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      Disease recurrence remains a major challenge in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer. Serum FAS (tumor necrosis receptor superfamily, member 6) ligand levels demonstrate a significant association with disease recurrence in this patient population.

    5. Gastrointestinal Disease
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      Effect of metabolic syndrome and its components on recurrence and survival in colon cancer patients (pages 1512–1520)

      Yang Yang, Patrick D. Mauldin, Myla Ebeling, Thomas C. Hulsey, Baorui Liu, Melanie B. Thomas, Ernest R. Camp and Nestor F. Esnaola

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27923

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      Metabolic syndrome has no apparent effect on colon cancer outcomes. This effect probably is attributable to the combined adverse effects of elevated glucose/diabetes mellitus and hypertension and the protective effect of dyslipidemia in patients with nonmetastatic disease.

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      Phase 2 study of preoperative radiation with concurrent capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab followed by surgery and postoperative 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin (FOLFOX), and bevacizumab in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer: ECOG 3204 (pages 1521–1527)

      Jerome C. Landry, Yang Feng, Steven J. Cohen, Charles A. Staley III, Richard Whittington, Elin Ruth Sigurdson, Halla Nimeiri, Udit Verma, Roshan S. Prabhu and Al Bowen Benson

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27890

      The addition of oxaliplatin and bevacizumab to fluoropyrimidine-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer resulted in pathologic tumor downstaging in the majority of patients, with a pathologic complete response rate of 17%. Increased wound healing delays and complications may have been related to the addition of bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, or both.

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      Body mass index at diagnosis and survival among colon cancer patients enrolled in clinical trials of adjuvant chemotherapy (pages 1528–1536)

      Frank A. Sinicrope, Nathan R. Foster, Greg Yothers, Al Benson, Jean Francois Seitz, Roberto Labianca, Richard M. Goldberg, Aimery DeGramont, Michael J. O'Connell, Daniel J. Sargent and for the Adjuvant Colon Cancer Endpoints (ACCENT) Group

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27938

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      Patients with colon cancer who are obese or underweight at enrollment into postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy studies have inferior survival rates compared with normal-weight patients. In addition, the risk of mortality for patients in these body mass index subgroups is greater in men than in women.

    8. Genitourinary Disease
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      Population-based 10-year oncologic outcomes after low-dose-rate brachytherapy for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer (pages 1537–1546)

      W. James Morris, Mira Keyes, Ingrid Spadinger, Winkle Kwan, Mitchell Liu, Michael McKenzie, Howard Pai, Tom Pickles and Scott Tyldesley

      Article first published online: 26 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27911

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      In a population-based cohort of 1006 patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer, the actuarial disease-free survival (DFS) rates using competing risks (Fine and Gray) analysis after low-dose-rate brachytherapy are 96.7% at 5 years and 94.1% at 10 years using the standard Phoenix definition for biochemical recurrence. None of the traditional prognostic factors reaches statistical significance for DFS in univariate or multivariate analysis; however, among men who do not receive neoadjuvant and concomitant androgen-deprivation therapy (N = 348), increasing values for dose metrics predict improved DFS (P = .043).

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      Deletions of chromosomes 3p and 14q molecularly subclassify clear cell renal cell carcinoma (pages 1547–1554)

      Nils Kroeger, Tobias Klatte, Karim Chamie, P. Nagesh Rao, Frédéric D. Birkhäuser, Geoffrey A. Sonn, Joseph Riss, Fairooz F. Kabbinavar, Arie S. Belldegrun and Allan J. Pantuck

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27947

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      In patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma, loss of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene is associated with more favorable pathologic features and with improved recurrence-free and cancer-specific survival, whereas loss of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) gene is associated with worse recurrence-free and cancer-specific survival. Combined loss of chromosome 3p/14q is a strong predictor of disease recurrence in patients with low-stage (pathologic T1) renal cell carcinoma, supporting the hypothesis that HIF-1α functions as a tumor suppressor gene in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    10. Gynecologic Oncology
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      Adjuvant therapy for high-grade, uterus-limited leiomyosarcoma : Results of a phase 2 trial (SARC 005) (pages 1555–1561)

      Martee L. Hensley, J. Kyle Wathen, Robert G. Maki, Dejka M. Araujo, Gregory Sutton, Dennis A. Priebat, Suzanne George, Robert A. Soslow and Laurence H. Baker

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27942

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      Among women with high-grade, uterus-limited leiomyosarcoma who receive treatment with adjuvant gemcitabine plus docetaxel followed by doxorubicin, 78% remain progression-free at 2 years, and 57% remain progression-free at 3 years.

    11. Melanoma
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      Aspirin is associated with lower melanoma risk among postmenopausal Caucasian women : The Women's Health Initiative (pages 1562–1569)

      Christina A. Gamba, Susan M. Swetter, Marcia L. Stefanick, Jessica Kubo, Manisha Desai, Katrina M. Spaunhurst, Animesh A. Sinha, Maryam M. Asgari, Susan Sturgeon and Jean Y. Tang

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27817

      Aspirin use is associated with a lower risk of melanoma among 59,806 postmenopausal Caucasian women in a prospective cohort. Longer duration of aspirin use is associated with greater protection.

    12. Discipline

      Epidemiology
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      Using primary site as a predictor of survival in mantle cell lymphoma (pages 1570–1577)

      Alexander J. Ambinder, Pareen J. Shenoy, Loretta J. Nastoupil and Christopher R. Flowers

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27898

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      In an analysis of patients with mantle cell lymphoma in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database, patients with primary disease of the gastrointestinal tract and of the head and neck had improved survival compared to those with primary disease of the lymph nodes. Primary site of disease may be associated with favorable treatment strategies or tumor biology in patients with mantle cell lymphoma.

    13. Pediatric Oncology
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      Radiation therapy target volume reduction in pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma : Implications for patterns of disease recurrence and overall survival (pages 1578–1585)

      Bree R. Eaton, Mark W. McDonald, Sungjin Kim, Robert B. Marcus Jr., Anna L. Sutter, Zhengjia Chen and Natia Esiashvili

      Article first published online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27934

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      In this review of 55 children with non-metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma, 28 patients (51%) received a radiation therapy cone-down boost with a median relative reduction in the high-dose treatment volume of 56% (range, 5%-91%). The local control rate was 91% with no recognized detriment to the receipt of reduced volume RT; however, in the subset of patients with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma and intracranial tumor extension, 4 patients (30%) who received reduced volume RT experienced leptomeningeal failure as their first site of disease progression.

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      Synchronous bilateral Wilms tumor : A report from the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) (pages 1586–1592)

      Paolo Indolfi, Alessandro Jenkner, Monica Terenziani, Alessandro Crocoli, Annalisa Serra, Paola Collini, Davide Biasoni, Lorenza Gandola, Gianni Bisogno, Giovanni Cecchetto, Martina Di Martino, Paolo D'Angelo, Maurizio Bianchi, Massimo Conte, Alessandro Inserra, Andrea Pession, Filippo Spreafico and on behalf of the AIEOP Wilms Tumor Working Group

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27897

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      In this study, evidence was sought to support the choices usually made concerning the management of bilateral Wilms tumor, through analysis of a large series of 90 cases. The optimal duration and choice of drugs for preoperative chemotherapy, particularly the addition of doxorubicin, remain an open question.

    15. Outcomes Research
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      Association between adherence to National Comprehensive Cancer Network treatment guidelines and improved survival in patients with colon cancer (pages 1593–1601)

      Genevieve M. Boland, George J. Chang, Alex B. Haynes, Yi-Ju Chiang, Ryaz Chagpar, Yan Xing, Chung-Yuan Hu, Barry W. Feig, Y. Nancy You and Janice N. Cormier

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27935

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      Significant variability in the treatment of stage III and high-risk stage II colon cancer have been documented. National Comprehensive Cancer Network guideline-based treatment recommendations for stage III and high-risk stage II colon cancer are associated with improved survival outcomes.

  6. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review Articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content

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