You have free access to this content

Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 119 Issue 9

1 May 2013

Volume 119, Issue 9

Pages 1605–1763

  1. Issue information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Original Articles
    7. Correspondence
    8. Errata
    9. Miscellaneous
    1. You have free access to this content
      Issue information (pages i–vii)

      Version of Record online: 9 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29966

  2. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Original Articles
    7. Correspondence
    8. Errata
    9. Miscellaneous
    1. You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
      Cancer mortality declines 20% since 1991 (page 1607)

      Carrie Printz

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28123

      • original image
    3. You have free access to this content
  3. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Original Articles
    7. Correspondence
    8. Errata
    9. Miscellaneous
    1. You have free access to this content
      How is a molecular polymorphism defined? (page 1608)

      Verena Schildgen and Oliver Schildgen

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27966

      In this commentary, the authors address the question of how molecular polymorphisms are defined. Despite an overwhelming amount of literature reporting on single-nucleotide polymorphisms, there is still no harmonized definition of this term, which the authors believe is not acceptable in the area of personalized medicine.

  4. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Original Articles
    7. Correspondence
    8. Errata
    9. Miscellaneous
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The essential elements of a therapeutic presence (pages 1609–1610)

      Lidia Schapira

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27946

      The model of therapeutic effectiveness developed by Chochinov et al can be applied to oncology clinicians. Implementation requires changes in organizational culture and realignment of incentives.

  5. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Original Articles
    7. Correspondence
    8. Errata
    9. Miscellaneous
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
      You have free access to this content
      Male breast cancer according to tumor subtype and race : A population-based study (pages 1611–1617)

      Mariana Chavez-MacGregor, Christina A. Clarke, Daphne Lichtensztajn, Gabriel N. Hortobagyi and Sharon H. Giordano

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27905

      • original image
      • original image
      • original image

      In this large, population-based study of patients with male breast cancer, the majority of tumors are hormone receptor-positive (positive for both estrogen and progesterone receptor) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative; however, significant proportions of tumors are HER2-positive. The distribution of tumors according to subtype varies according to race/ethnicity.

    2. Gastrointestinal Disease
      You have free access to this content
      Gastric juice MicroRNAs as potential biomarkers for the screening of gastric cancer (pages 1618–1626)

      Long Cui, Xinjun Zhang, Guoliang Ye, Tuo Zheng, Haojun Song, Hongxia Deng, Bingxiu Xiao, Tian Xia, Xiuchong Yu, Yanping Le and Junming Guo

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27903

      • original image
      • original image
      • original image
      • original image
      • original image

      Stable microRNAs exist in gastric juice and can be detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Certain microRNAs in gastric juice, including microRNA-21 and microRNA-106a, can be used as biomarkers to detect gastric cancer with satisfactory specificity and sensitivity.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Identification of ROS1 rearrangement in gastric adenocarcinoma (pages 1627–1635)

      Jeeyun Lee, Seung Eun Lee, So Young Kang, In-Gu Do, Sujin Lee, Sang Yun Ha, Jeonghee Cho, Won Ki Kang, Jiryeon Jang, Sai-Hong Ignatius Ou and Kyoung-Mee Kim

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27967

      • original image
      • original image
      • original image

      An SLC34A2-ROS1 rearrangement is identified in gastric carcinoma (GC) that is unique from human epidermal growth factor receptor HER2-amplified GC. The results provide a rationale for investigating the clinical efficacy of ROS1 inhibitors in this unique molecular subset of GC.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Increased survival associated with surgery and radiation therapy in metastatic gastric cancer : A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database analysis (pages 1636–1642)

      Ravi Shridhar, Khaldoun Almhanna, Sarah E. Hoffe, William Fulp, Jill Weber, Michael D. Chuong and Kenneth L. Meredith

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27927

      • original image

      Patients with metastatic gastric cancer have poor survival. Analysis by these authors reveals significantly improved survival in metastatic gastric cancer patients undergoing surgery and radiation therapy compared with patients who do not receive any locoregional therapy.

    5. Genitourinary Disease
      You have free access to this content
      Genetic variations in regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) confer risk of bladder cancer (pages 1643–1651)

      Eugene K. Lee, Yuanquing Ye, Ashish M. Kamat and Xifeng Wu

      Version of Record online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27871

      • original image
      • original image

      Genetic variations in the regulator of G-protein signaling pathway are associated with the overall risk of bladder cancer, recurrence, and progression in patients with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer and with the risk of death in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    6. Gynecologic Oncology
      You have free access to this content
      Comparison of age at natural menopause in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with a non–clinic-based sample of women in northern California (pages 1652–1659)

      Wayne T. Lin, Mary Beattie, Lee-may Chen, Kutluk Oktay, Sybil L. Crawford, Ellen B. Gold, Marcelle Cedars and Mitchell Rosen

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27952

      • original image
      • original image
      • original image
      • original image
      • original image

      Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation tend to undergo earlier natural menopause compared with the general population, and current heavy smoking is associated with the onset of menopause at an even earlier age. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to explore the association between BRCA1/2 and age at the onset of menopause by comparing BRCA1/2 carriers with women in the general population.

    7. Hematologic Malignancies
      You have free access to this content
      Dose-intensive chemotherapy including rituximab in Burkitt's leukemia or lymphoma regardless of human immunodeficiency virus infection status : Final results of a phase 2 study (Burkimab) (pages 1660–1668)

      Josep-Maria Ribera, Olga García, Carlos Grande, Jordi Esteve, Albert Oriol, Juan Bergua, José González-Campos, Ferran Vall-llovera, Mar Tormo, Jesús-Maria Hernández-Rivas, Daniel García, Salut Brunet, Natalia Alonso, Pere Barba, Pilar Miralles, Andreu Llorente, Pau Montesinos, Maria-José Moreno, Jose-Ángel Hernández-Rivas and Teresa Bernal

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27918

      • original image
      • original image

      Age-adapted intensive immunochemotherapy is highly effective in both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative and HIV-positive patients. Poor general status and bone marrow involvement were associated with short survival.

    8. Hepatobiliary Disease
      You have free access to this content
      KRAS and GNAS mutations and p53 overexpression in biliary intraepithelial neoplasia and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (pages 1669–1674)

      Maylee Hsu, Motoko Sasaki, Saya Igarashi, Yasunori Sato and Yasuni Nakanuma

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27955

      • original image
      • original image
      • original image

      Mutations in the v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) occur as an early molecular event during the progression of biliary intraepithelial neoplasia to intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Biliary intraepithelial neoplasia may arise from large bile ducts and peribiliary glands with KRAS mutations in patients with hepatolithiasis.

    9. Melanoma
      You have free access to this content
      Patterns of onset and resolution of immune-related adverse events of special interest with ipilimumab : Detailed safety analysis from a phase 3 trial in patients with advanced melanoma (pages 1675–1682)

      Jeffrey S. Weber, Reinhard Dummer, Veerle de Pril, Celeste Lebbé, F. Stephen Hodi and for the MDX010-20 Investigators

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27969

      • original image
      • original image

      In the phase 3 MDX010-20 trial, treatment with ipilimumab resulted in a characteristic spectrum of adverse events of special interest, consistent with its immune-based mechanism of action. Most ipilimumab-associated adverse events developed within 12 weeks of initial dosing and could be managed using published algorithms.

    10. Discipline

      Clinical Trials
      You have free access to this content
      A phase 2 study of epothilone B analog BMS-247550 (NSC 710428) in patients with relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas (pages 1683–1689)

      Jane E. Churpek, Barbara Pro, Koen van Besien, Justin Kline, Kathy Conner, James L. Wade III, Fredrick Hagemeister, Theodore Karrison and Sonali M. Smith

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27917

      • original image

      Ixabepilone is a unique inhibitor of tubulin depolymerization. It has modest single-agent activity in heavily pretreated patients with relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    11. Complementary Medicine
      You have free access to this content
      Qigong improves quality of life in women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer : Results of a randomized controlled trial (pages 1690–1698)

      Zhen Chen, Zhiqiang Meng, Kathrin Milbury, Wenying Bei, Ying Zhang, Bob Thornton, Zhongxing Liao, Qi Wei, Jiayi Chen, Xiaoma Guo, Luming Liu, Jennifer McQuade, Clemens Kirschbaum and Lorenzo Cohen

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27904

      • original image
      • original image
      • original image

      The benefits of a qigong intervention during radiotherapy for women with breast cancer are examined. Qigong leads to reduced depressive symptoms over time and is especially beneficial for patients with preintervention elevated levels of depressive symptoms in the area of fatigue and quality of life.

    12. Epidemiology
      You have free access to this content
      Amiodarone and the risk of cancer : A nationwide population-based study (pages 1699–1705)

      Vincent Yi-Fong Su, Yu-Wen Hu, Kun-Ta Chou, Shuo-Ming Ou, Yu-Chin Lee, Elizabeth Ya-Hsuan Lin, Tzeng-Ji Chen, Cheng-Hwai Tzeng and Chia-Jen Liu

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27881

      • original image

      Amiodarone may be associated with an increased risk of incident cancer, especially in males. A dose-effect relation between amiodarone and cancer occurrence was found in the current study.

    13. Psychosocial Oncology
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Health care provider communication : An empirical model of therapeutic effectiveness (pages 1706–1713)

      Harvey M. Chochinov, Susan E. McClement, Thomas F. Hack, Nancy A. McKeen, Amanda M. Rach, Pierre Gagnon, Shane Sinclair and Jill Taylor-Brown

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27949

      • original image

      An empirical model of optimal therapeutic effectiveness developed by the authors offers cancer care professionals detailed insights regarding the elements and pedagogy of effective communication and psychosocial care for patients experiencing illness-related distress.

    14. You have free access to this content
      Screening for distress in cancer patients : A multicenter, nationwide study in Italy (pages 1714–1721)

      Luigi Grassi, Christoffer Johansen, Maria Antonietta Annunziata, Eleonora Capovilla, Anna Costantini, Paolo Gritti, Riccardo Torta, Marco Bellani and on behalf of the Italian Society of Psycho-Oncology Distress Thermometer Study Group

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27902

      • original image
      • original image

      Routine screening for distress is recommended internationally as a necessary standard for good cancer care. In a multicenter Italian study of screening for distress in patients with cancer, the Distress Thermometer was identified as a simple and effective screening tool for detecting distress.

    15. You have free access to this content
      The impact of having a sister diagnosed with breast cancer on cancer-related distress and breast cancer risk perception (pages 1722–1728)

      Kelly A. Metcalfe, May-Lynn Quan, Andrea Eisen, Tulin Cil, Ping Sun and Steven A. Narod

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27924

      The current study reports that levels of cancer-related distress in the sisters of women who are newly diagnosed with breast cancer (with no other family history of the disease) are high and are similar to those observed in women who have just learned of an inherited BRCA (breast cancer gene) mutation, and yet their personal risk of breast cancer is significantly lower. This finding has clinical implications, and future interventions may be necessary for this group of women.

    16. Quality of Life
      You have free access to this content
      Patient-reported outcomes after 3-dimensional conformal, intensity-modulated, or proton beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer (pages 1729–1735)

      Phillip J. Gray, Jonathan J. Paly, Beow Y. Yeap, Martin G. Sanda, Howard. M. Sandler, Jeff M. Michalski, James A. Talcott, John J. Coen, Daniel A. Hamstra, William U. Shipley, Stephen M. Hahn, Anthony L. Zietman, Justin E. Bekelman and Jason A. Efstathiou

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27956

      • original image

      Prostate cancer patients who receive 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, or proton beam therapy report distinct patterns of treatment-related quality of life. Although the timing of toxicity varies between cohorts, patients report similar modest quality-of-life decrements in the bowel domain and minimal QOL decrements in the urinary domains at 24 months.

    17. Radiation Oncology
      You have free access to this content
      Phase 2 study of pre-excision single-dose intraoperative radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancers : Six-year update with application of the ASTRO accelerated partial breast irradiation consensus statement criteria (pages 1736–1743)

      Noam A. VanderWalde, Ellen L. Jones, Randall J. Kimple, Dominic T. Moore, Nancy Klauber-DeMore, Carolyn I. Sartor and David W. Ollila

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27915

      • original image
      • original image
      • original image

      Between 2003 and 2007, a phase 2 study was performed to test the efficacy and toxicity of pre-excision intraoperative radiation therapy for patients with early-stage breast cancer. Of the patients who received this therapy without adjuvant local therapy, 15% had ipsilateral breast recurrences.

    18. Symptom Control and Palliative Care
      You have free access to this content
      An eHealth system supporting palliative care for patients with non–small cell lung cancer : A randomized trial (pages 1744–1751)

      David H. Gustafson, Lori L. DuBenske, Kang Namkoong, Robert Hawkins, Ming-Yuan Chih, Amy K. Atwood, Roberta Johnson, Abhik Bhattacharya, Cindy L. Carmack, Anne M. Traynor, Toby C. Campbell, Mary K. Buss, Ramaswamy Govindan, Joan H. Schiller and James F. Cleary

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27939

      • original image
      • original image

      Patients in caregiver-patient dyads who are randomized to an eHealth system that supports palliative care (Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System [CHESS]) for non–small cell lung cancer have significantly less physical symptom distress compared with patients in similar dyads from an Internet arm.

    19. Translational Research
      You have free access to this content
      Cohypermethylation of p14 in combination with CADM1 or DCC as a recurrence-related prognostic indicator in stage I esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (pages 1752–1760)

      Eunju Lee, Bo Bin Lee, Eunkyung Ko, Yujin Kim, Jungho Han, Young Mog Shim, Joobae Park and Duk-Hwan Kim

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27948

      • original image
      • original image
      • original image
      • original image

      Despite significant advances in the detection and treatment of esophageal cancer, the prognosis for patients with the disease is very poor, which results in part from the high rate of recurrence. This study indicates that the analysis of methylation statuses of the genes cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (p14), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), and deleted in colon carcinoma (DCC) in patients with stage I esophageal squamous cell carcinoma will allow the identification of patients who are at high risk of recurrence after esophagectomy.

  6. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Original Articles
    7. Correspondence
    8. Errata
    9. Miscellaneous
    1. You have free access to this content
  7. Errata

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Original Articles
    7. Correspondence
    8. Errata
    9. Miscellaneous
    1. You have free access to this content
      Erratum (page 1762)

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27958

    2. You have free access to this content
      Erratum (page 1762)

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27964

      This article corrects:
  8. Miscellaneous

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentaries
    5. Editorials
    6. Original Articles
    7. Correspondence
    8. Errata
    9. Miscellaneous
    1. Information Item

      You have free access to this content
      Follow-up to expression of concern (page 1763)

      Fadlo R. Khuri

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28096

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION