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Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 120 Issue 11

1 June 2014

Volume 120, Issue 11

Pages 1597–1754

  1. Issue information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentary
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Errata
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      Issue information (pages i–ix)

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29665

  2. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentary
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Errata
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    3. You have free access to this content
  3. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentary
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Errata
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      The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: Is it good or bad for oncology? (pages 1600–1603)

      Hagop M. Kantarjian, David P. Steensma and Donald W. Light

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28673

      The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) has many flaws that need to be addressed, but it is better than what was. Oncologists should advocate for the ACA and work on improving it.

  4. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentary
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Errata
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      Ramucirumab in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: The beginning or the end? (pages 1604–1607)

      Sumanta K. Pal and Robert A. Figlin

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28636

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      The current editorial focuses on a phase 2 study evaluating ramucirumab in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) who have received prior sunitinib and/or sorafenib therapy. The potential for further development is discussed in the context of the rapidly changing landscape of therapy for mRCC.

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      Local treatment of high risk prostate cancer: Role of surgery and radiation therapy (pages 1608–1610)

      Tudor Borza and Adam S. Kibel

      Version of Record online: 19 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28645

      The current management of patients with high-risk prostate cancer is hampered by overstaging. This editorial reviews the referenced article as well as outlines the treatment strategies for patients with aggressive disease.

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      Increasing complexity of high-grade B-cell lymphomas (pages 1611–1613)

      James O. Armitage and R. Gregory Bociek

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28637

      Morphologic heterogeneity is only part of the picture for patients with high-grade B-cell lymphomas, and many of these lymphomas are biologically driven by equally complex variations in genetics and protein expression. In this patient population, novel targeted therapies need to be tested in combination with chemoimmunotherapy in the front-line setting, because the proportion of patients who progress early is so high, and many patients do not appear to be salvageable with further conventional chemotherapy regimens.

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      Fishing for myelodysplastic syndromes finds uncaptured cases by state cancer registries: Need for more resources (pages 1614–1616)

      Christopher R. Cogle

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28638

      There is a high number of uncaptured cases with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) by population-based cancer registries. A novel method of capture-recapture was used to identify uncaptured MDS cases.

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      Ipilimumab before BRAF inhibitor treatment may be more beneficial than vice versa for the majority of patients with advanced melanoma (pages 1617–1619)

      Paolo A. Ascierto and Kim Margolin

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28622

      The use of sequential therapy with ipilimumab and vemurafenib reported by Ackerman et al in this issue demonstrates that patients who failed BRAF inhibitor therapy appeared to have an inferior outcome than patients who received ipilimumab followed by BRAF inhibitor therapy. These results are in line with previous experience and provide additional evidence to support the use of ipilimumab before a BRAF inhibitor in the majority of patients with advanced melanoma who have an activating BRAF mutation and who are treated outside of a clinical trial.

  5. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentary
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Errata
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      Current trends for the use of androgen deprivation therapy in conjunction with radiotherapy for patients with unfavorable intermediate-risk, high-risk, localized, and locally advanced prostate cancer (pages 1620–1629)

      Mack Roach III

      Version of Record online: 3 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28594

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      This review examines the clinical evidence underpinning the use of androgen deprivation therapy and radiotherapy for patients with high-risk localized and locally advanced prostate cancer in the United States. It also considers the rationale for moving from traditional luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists to more recently developed gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonists.

  6. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentary
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Errata
    1. Disease Site

      Genitourinary Disease
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      Perioperative chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer: A population-based outcomes study (pages 1630–1638)

      Christopher M. Booth, D. Robert Siemens, Gavin Li, Yingwei Peng, Ian F. Tannock, Weidong Kong, David M. Berman and William J. Mackillop

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28510

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      Perioperative chemotherapy remains underutilized in routine clinical practice. The results of this large contemporary population-based study suggest that adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with substantial improvement in the general population.

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      Brain metastases associated with germ cell tumors may be treated with chemotherapy alone (pages 1639–1646)

      Anna Hardt, Jonathan Krell, Peter D. Wilson, Victoria Harding, Simon Chowdhury, Danish Mazhar, Dan Berney, Justin Stebbing and Jonathan Shamash

      Version of Record online: 25 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28629

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      Current data from a single-institution study of patients with advanced testicular germ cell tumors and brain metastases suggest that GAMEC chemotherapy (14-day cisplatin, high-dose methotrexate, etoposide, and actinomycin-D with filgrastim support) can achieve long-term survival on its own, without the need for additional treatment modalities.

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      A phase 2, single-arm study of ramucirumab in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma with disease progression on or intolerance to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy (pages 1647–1655)

      Jorge A. Garcia, Gary R. Hudes, Toni K. Choueiri, Walter M. Stadler, Laura S. Wood, Jayne Gurtler, Shailender Bhatia, Adarsh Joshi, Rebecca R. Hozak, Yihuan Xu, Jonathan D. Schwartz and John A. Thompson

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28634

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      In this single-arm, phase 2 trial, ramucirumab monotherapy had a limited impact on the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors–defined response of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who either had progression on or developed drug intolerance to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitory tyrosine kinase inhibitors. However, the median and 1-year progression-free survival rates were encouraging, and ramucirumab was safe and well tolerated.

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      The impact of pathologic staging on the long-term oncologic outcomes of patients with clinically high-risk prostate cancer (pages 1656–1662)

      Michael R. Abern, Martha K. Terris, William J. Aronson, Christopher J. Kane, Christopher L. Amling, Matthew R. Cooperberg and Stephen J. Freedland

      Version of Record online: 19 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28647

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      A significant number of men with clinically high-risk prostate cancer have favorable radical prostatectomy pathology. These patients have excellent long-term oncologic outcomes and many will not require adjuvant or salvage therapy.

    5. Gynecologic Oncology
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      Clinical outcomes of carbon ion radiotherapy for locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix in phase 1/2 clinical trial (protocol 9704) (pages 1663–1669)

      Masaru Wakatsuki, Shingo Kato, Tatsuya Ohno, Kumiko Karasawa, Hiroki Kiyohara, Tomoaki Tamaki, Ken Ando, Hirohiko Tsujii, Takashi Nakano, Tadashi Kamada, Makio Shozu and The Working Group of the Gynecological Tumor

      Version of Record online: 3 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28621

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      This is the first clinical trial and dose escalation study of carbon ion radiotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix. Dose escalation of carbon ion radiotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix was accomplished safely, with no severe toxicities.

    6. Hematologic Malignancies
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      Disparity in perceptions of disease characteristics, treatment effectiveness, and factors influencing treatment adherence between physicians and patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (pages 1670–1676)

      David P. Steensma, Rami S. Komrokji, Richard M. Stone, Alan F. List, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, John M. Huber, Betsy Dennison and Mikkael A. Sekeres

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28631

      Patients, physicians, and nonphysician health care professionals have differing perspectives on myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and MDS therapy, with physicians viewing the treatment experience less favorably than patients but having a more favorable view of the potential benefits of therapy than patients. Patients with MDS often do not consider MDS a “cancer,” although MDS is classified as such by the World Health Organization, and most patients and nonphysician health care professionals are unaware that MDS can be cured through stem cell transplantation.

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      Complete response to induction therapy in patients with Myc-positive and double-hit non-Hodgkin lymphoma is associated with prolonged progression-free survival (pages 1677–1685)

      Jonathon B. Cohen, Susan M. Geyer, Gerard Lozanski, Weiqiang Zhao, Nyla A. Heerema, Nathan C. Hall, Veena A. Nagar, Jessica A. Hemminger, Jeffrey A. Jones, Pierluigi Porcu, Beth A. Christian, Robert A. Baiocchi, Kami J. Maddocks, Joseph M. Flynn, Steven M. Devine and Kristie A. Blum

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28642

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      Patients with Myc-positive or double-hit non-Hodgkin lymphoma have inferior progression-free and overall survival. The authors identify a subset of patients who achieve a complete response to induction therapy who have prolonged remission durations.

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      Underestimation of myelodysplastic syndrome incidence by cancer registries: Results from a population-based data linkage study (pages 1686–1694)

      Zoe K. McQuilten, Erica M. Wood, Mark N. Polizzotto, Lynda J. Campbell, Meaghan Wall, David J. Curtis, Helen Farrugia, John J. McNeil and Vijaya Sundararajan

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28641

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      Previous reports have suggested that myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are underreported to cancer registries, and therefore may have a substantially higher incidence. However, whether these findings are broadly applicable is unknown. Using 2 data sources from a different population, a higher incidence of MDS was found than was reported using cancer registry notifications alone as well as differences between reported and nonreported cases.

    9. Melanoma
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      Outcomes of patients with metastatic melanoma treated with immunotherapy prior to or after BRAF inhibitors (pages 1695–1701)

      Allison Ackerman, Oliver Klein, David F. McDermott, Wei Wang, Nageatte Ibrahim, Donald P. Lawrence, Anasuya Gunturi, Keith T. Flaherty, F. Stephen Hodi, Richard Kefford, Alexander M. Menzies, Michael B. Atkins, Georgina V. Long and Ryan J. Sullivan

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28620

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      Four new therapies have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration from 2011 to 2013 for the treatment of metastatic melanoma, yet there are little data to guide sequencing of these therapies. In a retrospective analysis, immunotherapy does not alter treatment effect of the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib, and treatment with an immunotherapeutic, ipilimumab, is not effective following prior therapy with vemurafenib in patients with BRAF-mutant, metastatic melanoma.

    10. Discipline

      Disparities Research
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      Improving colorectal cancer screening in Asian Americans: Results of a randomized intervention study (pages 1702–1712)

      Patricia A. Carney, Frances Lee-Lin, Solange Mongoue-Tchokote, Motomi Mori, Holden Leung, Christine Lau, T. Domi Le and David A. Lieberman

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28640

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      An intervention has the greatest influence on a Chinese subgroup, which has improved scores relative to a control group for perceived behavior control and intentions, for behavioral beliefs on cancer screening, and for attitudes toward behavior. An educational program delivered by culturally specific community health educators using culturally appropriate language influences some knowledge, attitude, and behavioral beliefs but not others.

    11. Outcomes Research
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      Comparative analysis of 5 lung cancer natural history and screening models that reproduce outcomes of the NLST and PLCO trials (pages 1713–1724)

      Rafael Meza, Kevin ten Haaf, Chung Yin Kong, Ayca Erdogan, William C. Black, Martin C. Tammemagi, Sung Eun Choi, Jihyoun Jeon, Summer S. Han, Vidit Munshi, Joost van Rosmalen, Paul Pinsky, Pamela M. McMahon, Harry J. de Koning, Eric J. Feuer, William D. Hazelton and Sylvia K. Plevritis

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28623

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      Five lung cancer natural history models demonstrated that the National Lung Screening Trial and Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial have produced consistent results. The resulting models can be important tools to assess the effectiveness of lung cancer screening strategies using low-dose computed tomography.

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      Approximately one-half of patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma meeting Milan criteria did not receive local tumor destructive or curative surgery in the post-MELD exception era (pages 1725–1732)

      Pardha Devaki, Robert J. Wong, Vidyasagargoud Marupakula, Sharad Nangia, Long Nguyen, Ivo C. Ditah, Murray N. Ehrinpreis and Mindie H. Nguyen

      Version of Record online: 3 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28639

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      Despite meeting the criteria for liver transplantation, nearly one-half of eligible patients with localized hepatocellular carcinoma did not receive any therapy. Even in this current era, racial disparities in long-term survival exist, with black patients found to have the worst survival.

    13. Radiation Oncology
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      Chromosomal instability portends superior response of rectal adenocarcinoma to chemoradiation therapy (pages 1733–1742)

      Bassem I. Zaki, Arief A. Suriawinata, Alan R. Eastman, Kristen M. Garner and Samuel F. Bakhoum

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28656

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      The role of chromosomal instability (CIN) in tumor response to therapy is poorly understood and has generally been associated with poor prognosis. In the current study, the authors demonstrate that CIN is surprisingly correlated to a favorable response in patients with rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy.

    14. Symptom Control and Palliative Care
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      Impact of timing and setting of palliative care referral on quality of end-of-life care in cancer patients (pages 1743–1749)

      David Hui, Sun Hyun Kim, Joyce Roquemore, Rony Dev, Gary Chisholm and Eduardo Bruera

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28628

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      In this retrospective cohort study, patients with advanced cancer who have early access to outpatient palliative care receive less aggressive care at the end of life compared with those who have delayed access to palliative care and those who receive inpatient palliative care. These findings support the need to increase the availability of palliative care clinics and to streamline the process of early referral.

  7. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentary
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Errata
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      How can patients who are not referred for treatment receive the best treatment available? (pages 1750–1751)

      Graham W. Warren, James R. Marshall, K. Michael Cummings, Anurag K. Singh and Mary E. Reid

      Version of Record online: 20 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28590

  8. Errata

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Commentary
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Errata
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