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Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 120 Issue 4

15 February 2014

Volume 120, Issue 4

Pages 457–613

  1. Issue information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Communication
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
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      Issue information (pages i–viii)

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29594

  2. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Communication
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
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    2. You have free access to this content
    3. You have free access to this content
    4. You have free access to this content
  3. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Communication
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Communication
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
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    2. You have free access to this content
      “Meaningful use” provides a meaningful opportunity (pages 464–468)

      Vance Rabius, Maher Karam-Hage, Janice A. Blalock and Paul M. Cinciripini

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28436

      A model is described for meeting the mandate that includes implementation of a comprehensive smoking (tobacco) cessation program for cancer patients as an alternative to the minimal intervention approach. The importance of an institution-wide, automated system to identify and refer tobacco users to treatment is discussed within the context of implementing the meaningful use regulations for electronic health records.

  5. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Communication
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
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      Cardiovascular disease in survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation (pages 469–479)

      Saro H. Armenian and Eric J. Chow

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28444

      Survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation are at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular complications after hematopoietic cell transplantation. The current report is an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding pathogenesis, risk factors, and strategies for cardiovascular disease prevention in these survivors.

  6. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Communication
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    1. Disease Site

      Gastrointestinal Disease
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      Autophagy and enhanced chemosensitivity in experimental pancreatic cancers induced by noninvasive radiofrequency field treatment (pages 480–491)

      Nadezhda V. Koshkina, Katrina Briggs, Flavio Palalon and Steven A. Curley

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28453

      In the current study, the authors demonstrated the feasibility of a noninvasive method of cancer treatment using electromagnetic waves at a frequency of short radio waves. This principally novel method of treatment can enhance the anticancer effect of chemotherapy.

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      Nomogram for predicting the benefit of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for patients with esophageal cancer: A SEER-Medicare analysis (pages 492–498)

      Robert Eil, Brian S. Diggs, Samuel J. Wang, James P. Dolan, John G. Hunter and Charles R. Thomas

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28447

      A user-friendly Web-based survival prediction tool for patients with esophageal cancer was developed and implemented. This tool is of potential use for patients and practitioners and provides personalized outcome estimates.

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      Chemoradiation therapy sequencing for resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma in the National Cancer Data Base (pages 499–506)

      Lauren E. Colbert, William A. Hall, Dana Nickleach, Jeffrey Switchenko, David A. Kooby, Yuan Liu, Theresa Gillespie, Joseph Lipscomb, John Kauh and Jerome C. Landry

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28530

      This analysis of the National Cancer Data Base describes the relationship between radiation therapy (RT) and surgery sequencing in patients receiving preoperative RT and postoperative RT for resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma. No significant difference in overall survival was found between these 2 groups. Preoperative RT was significantly associated with a higher rate of margin negativity and lymph node negativity at resection.

    4. Genitourinary Disease
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      Temporal trends and predictors of salvage cancer treatment after failure following radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy: An analysis from the CaPSURE registry (pages 507–512)

      K. Clint Cary, Alan Paciorek, Mahesh J. Fuldeore, Peter R. Carroll and Matthew R. Cooperberg

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28446

      There is an increasing trend in the utilization of local salvage therapy in prostate cancer patients over the past decade. The type of primary prostate cancer treatment and biopsy Gleason score are most predictive of type of salvage therapy.

    5. Hematologic Malignancies
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      A phase 2 study of ruxolitinib, an oral JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor, in patients with advanced polycythemia vera who are refractory or intolerant to hydroxyurea (pages 513–520)

      Srdan Verstovsek, Francesco Passamonti, Alessandro Rambaldi, Giovanni Barosi, Peter J. Rosen, Elisa Rumi, Elisabetta Gattoni, Lisa Pieri, Paola Guglielmelli, Chiara Elena, Shui He, Nancy Contel, Bijoyesh Mookerjee, Victor Sandor, Mario Cazzola, Hagop M. Kantarjian, Tiziano Barbui and Alessandro M. Vannucchi

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28441

      In the current study, patients with polycythemia vera who were refractory or intolerant to hydroxyurea achieved clinically meaningful and durable benefit from treatment with ruxolitinib with respect to reductions in hematocrit, platelet and white blood cell counts, splenomegaly, and symptoms. Given the limited therapeutic options for patients with advanced polycythemia vera, these results suggest that ruxolitinib has the potential to address an important unmet medical need in this patient population.

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      Low 25(OH) vitamin D3 levels are associated with adverse outcome in newly diagnosed, intensively treated adult acute myeloid leukemia (pages 521–529)

      Hun Ju Lee, Josephia R. Muindi, Wei Tan, Qiang Hu, Dan Wang, Song Liu, Gregory E. Wilding, Laurie A. Ford, Sheila N. J. Sait, Annemarie W. Block, Araba A. Adjei, Maurice Barcos, Elizabeth A. Griffiths, James E Thompson, Eunice S. Wang, Candace S. Johnson, Donald L. Trump and Meir Wetzler

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28368

      Low 25(OH) vitamin D3 levels are associated with a worse outcome in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. One vitamin D3 receptor single nucleotide polymorphism, rs10783219, is associated with a worse outcome.

    7. Melanoma
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      Patterns of response and progression in patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma metastatic to the brain who were treated with dabrafenib (pages 530–536)

      Mary W. F . Azer, Alexander M. Menzies, Lauren E. Haydu, Richard F. Kefford and Georgina V. Long

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28445

      Dabrafenib is highly active in patients with brain metastases, but little is known of the relative efficacy of treatment within and outside the brain. This study demonstrates that in patients with melanoma brain metastases, intra- and extracranial metastases respond similarly to dabrafenib, the brain is not always the site of treatment failure, and most patients can receive effective salvage local treatment to the brain upon intracranial disease progression

    8. Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma
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      Involvement and targeted intervention of dysregulated Hedgehog signaling in osteosarcoma (pages 537–547)

      Winnie W. Lo, Jay S. Wunder, Brendan C. Dickson, Veronica Campbell, Karen McGovern, Benjamin A. Alman and Irene L. Andrulis

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28439

      Dysregulated Hedgehog signaling is investigated as a targeted intervention for osteosarcoma using small-molecule modulators of the Hedgehog pathway in cell lines and IPI-926 (saridegib), a specific Smoothened inhibitor, in patient-derived xenograft models. Ligand-dependent and ligand-independent dysregulation and signaling crosstalk between the tumor and the stroma is identified and is supported by specific blockage of signaling exerted by the inhibitors.

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      Ganglioside GD2 as a therapeutic target for antibody-mediated therapy in patients with osteosarcoma (pages 548–554)

      Michael Roth, Marissa Linkowski, John Tarim, Sajida Piperdi, Rebecca Sowers, David Geller, Jonathan Gill and Richard Gorlick

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28461

      Ganglioside GD2 is highly expressed in osteosarcomas. Clinical trials are needed to assess the efficacy of targeting GD2 in patients with osteosarcoma.

    10. Discipline

      Disparities Research
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      Sex disparities in diagnosis of bladder cancer after initial presentation with hematuria: A nationwide claims-based investigation (pages 555–561)

      Joshua A. Cohn, Benjamin Vekhter, Christopher Lyttle, Gary D. Steinberg and Michael C. Large

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28416

      Multiple etiologies have been proposed for the disparate mortality observed for men and women with bladder cancer, including delay in diagnosis and treatment. In a nationwide claims-based MarketScan investigation, this study found that women experience significantly longer delays in diagnosis after presenting with hematuria.

    11. Epidemiology
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      Automated tobacco assessment and cessation support for cancer patients (pages 562–569)

      Graham W. Warren, James R. Marshall, K. Michael Cummings, Michael A. Zevon, Robert Reed, Pat Hysert, Martin C. Mahoney, Andrew J. Hyland, Chukwumere Nwogu, Todd Demmy, Elisabeth Dexter, Maureen Kelly, Richard J. O'Connor, Teresa Houstin, Dana Jenkins, Pamela Germain, Anurag K. Singh, Jennifer Epstein, Katharine A. Dobson Amato and Mary E. Reid

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28440

      Although tobacco use increases the risk of adverse outcomes in cancer patients, tobacco assessment and cessation support are not routinely included in cancer care. The reported results demonstrate that structured tobacco assessment with automatic referral to a dedicated cessation program can increase patient access to cessation support with high patient interest.

    12. Outcomes Research
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      Costs and outcomes evaluation of patient navigation after abnormal cancer screening: Evidence from the Patient Navigation Research Program (pages 570–578)

      Mark E. Bensink, Scott D. Ramsey, Tracy Battaglia, Kevin Fiscella, Thelma C. Hurd, June M. McKoy, Steven R. Patierno, Peter C. Raich, Eric E. Seiber, Victoria Warren-Mears, Elizabeth Whitley, Electra D. Paskett, S. Mandelblatt and Patient Navigation Research Program

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28438

      Patient navigation adds costs to screening programs and modestly increases the probability of diagnostic resolution. The navigation of patients with abnormal results from screening for breast, colorectal, cervical, and prostate cancer is only likely to be cost-effective if increases in resolution translate into the detection of earlier cancer stage at diagnosis.

    13. Pediatric Oncology
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      EWS-FLI-1 regulates the neuronal repressor gene REST, which controls Ewing sarcoma growth and vascular morphology (pages 579–588)

      Zhichao Zhou, Ling Yu and Eugenie S. Kleinerman

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28555

      EWS-FLI-1 regulates the neuronal repressor gene REST (RE1-silencing transcription factor). Inhibition of REST was found to reduce tumor growth and tumor vasculature in Ewing sarcoma.

    14. Translational Research
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      Design, development, and validation of a high-throughput drug-screening assay for targeting of human leukemia (pages 589–602)

      Katja Karjalainen, Renata Pasqualini, Jorge E. Cortes, Steven M. Kornblau, Benjamin Lichtiger, Susan O'Brien, Hagop M. Kantarjian, Richard L. Sidman, Wadih Arap and Erkki Koivunen

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28419

      It is fundamental to develop screening platforms that can assess the therapeutic relevance of drug candidates within the appropriate disease microenvironment. Therefore, the authors have developed a new functional screening assay that identifies potential antileukemia agents in the presence of human blood or bone marrow.

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      Molecular determinants of outcome with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition in endometrial cancer (pages 603–610)

      Helen J. Mackay, Elizabeth A. Eisenhauer, Suzanne Kamel-Reid, Ming Tsao, Blaise Clarke, Katherine Karakasis, Henrica M. J. Werner, Jone Trovik, Lars A. Akslen, Helga B. Salvesen, Dongsheng Tu and Amit M. Oza

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28414

      Despite extensive molecular profiling, no predictive biomarker for inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin was identified. Restriction and enrichment of study entry, especially based on archival tumor tissue, should be undertaken with caution.

  7. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. CancerScope
    4. Communication
    5. Editorials
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
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    2. You have free access to this content

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