Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 120 Issue 5

1 March 2014

Volume 120, Issue 5

Pages 615–769

  1. CancerScope

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Communication
    6. Correspondence
    7. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
  2. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Communication
    6. Correspondence
    7. Erratum
    1. The effects of bortezomib on bone disease in patients with multiple myeloma (pages 618–623)

      Mohamad Mohty, Florent Malard, Bilal Mohty, Bipin Savani, Philippe Moreau and Evangelos Terpos

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28481

      Beyond antimyeloma activity, bortezomib demonstrates significant effects on bone metabolism. Preclinical and clinical data have suggested that bortezomib directly stimulates osteoblast growth and differentiation while also inhibiting osteoclast development and activity.

    2. Integrating novel therapeutic monoclonal antibodies into the management of head and neck cancer (pages 624–632)

      Julie E. Bauman and Robert L. Ferris

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28380

      Monoclonal antibodies are clinically effective for head and neck cancer but only in a minority of patients. Understanding the mechanism of action and potential combinations may help stimulate antitumor immunity and improve clinical responses.

    3. Managing body image difficulties of adult cancer patients: Lessons from available research (pages 633–641)

      Michelle Cororve Fingeret, Irene Teo and Daniel E. Epner

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28469

      This review article reports on a growing body of research documenting body image concerns of patients with cancer and adverse psychosocial outcomes associated with these concerns. Support was found for cognitive-behavioral therapy interventions to treat body image difficulties in this population, and a practical strategy was proposed for the oncologic health care team to facilitate addressing body image concerns in a clinic setting.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Communication
    6. Correspondence
    7. Erratum
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Patient-reported outcomes from EMILIA, a randomized phase 3 study of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) versus capecitabine and lapatinib in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (pages 642–651)

      Manfred Welslau, Veronique Diéras, Joo-Hyuk Sohn, Sara A. Hurvitz, Deepa Lalla, Liang Fang, Betsy Althaus, Ellie Guardino and David Miles

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28465

      Patient-reported outcomes from the phase 3 EMILIA study showed trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) to have a more favorable effect on patient-reported health outcomes than capecitabine plus lapatinib. These results, coupled with the EMILIA efficacy and safety data, support the concept that T-DM1 has greater overall clinical benefit than capecitabine plus lapatinib in this population of patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)–positive metastatic breast cancer previously treated with a taxane and trastuzumab.

    2. Chest and Lung Disease
      The overexpression of 14-3-3ζ and Hsp27 promotes non–small cell lung cancer progression (pages 652–663)

      Guang-Yin Zhao, Jian-Yong Ding, Jie Gu, Chun-Lai Lu, Zong-Wu Lin, Jing Guo and Di Ge

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28452

      The combined expression of 14-3-3ζ and heat shock protein 27 may be a biomarker for predicting survival in patients with non–small cell lung cancer. This combination may have potential as a therapeutic target for non–small cell lung cancer.

    3. Drug-induced reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer treated with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib (pages 664–674)

      Evelyn M. Brosnan, Andrew J. Weickhardt, Xian Lu, Delee A. Maxon, Anna E. Barón, Michel Chonchol and D. Ross Camidge

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28478

      The creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is reduced by treatment with crizotinib, but the majority of patients will recover their eGFR after the cessation of therapy. Because the etiology is unclear, increased vigilance with regard to the concomitant use of renally cleared medications or nephrotoxic agents should be considered for patients receiving crizotinib and, when the eGFR is reduced, additional renal investigations should be undertaken.

    4. Gastrointestinal Disease
      MET amplification is not rare and predicts unfavorable clinical outcomes in patients with recurrent/metastatic gastric cancer after chemotherapy (pages 675–682)

      Xin An, Fang Wang, Qiong Shao, Feng-Hua Wang, Zhi-Qiang Wang, Cui Chen, Cong Li, Hui-Yan Luo, Dong-Sheng Zhang, Rui-Hua Xu and Yu-Hong Li

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28454

      The current study was performed to evaluate the prevalence and prognostic role of MET in patients with recurrent/metastatic gastric cancer who received chemotherapy. In patients with recurrent/metastatic gastric cancer, MET amplification and strong protein expression are not rare and are significantly associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes.

    5. Survival impact of surgical resection of primary tumor in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer: Results from a large population-based cohort study (pages 683–691)

      Shahid Ahmed, Anne Leis, Anthony Fields, Selliah Chandra-Kanthan, Kamal Haider, Riaz Alvi, Bruce Reeder and Punam Pahwa

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28464

      Currently, there is very low-quality evidence available regarding benefit of surgical resection of the primary tumor in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer. This large population-based cohort study demonstrated that primary tumor resection improves survival of patients with advanced colorectal cancer, independent of other prognostic variables such as age, performance status, comorbid illness, and chemotherapy.

    6. Genitourinary Disease
      Double-blind, randomized, phase 2 trial of maintenance sunitinib versus placebo after response to chemotherapy in patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma (pages 692–701)

      Petros D. Grivas, Stephanie Daignault, Scott T. Tagawa, David M. Nanus, Walter M. Stadler, Robert Dreicer, Manish Kohli, Daniel P. Petrylak, David J. Vaughn, Kathryn A. Bylow, Steven G. Wong, Joseph L. Sottnik, Evan T. Keller, Mahmoud Al-Hawary, David C. Smith and Maha Hussain

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28477

      The authors investigated the role of maintenance sunitinib in patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma. Maintenance sunitinib did not improve the 6-month progression rate and appeared to have only modest activity.

    7. Head and Neck Disease
      Improved survival using intensity-modulated radiation therapy in head and neck cancers: A SEER-Medicare analysis (pages 702–710)

      Beth M. Beadle, Kai-Ping Liao, Linda S. Elting, Thomas A. Buchholz, K. Kian Ang, Adam S. Garden and B. Ashleigh Guadagnolo

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28372

      The goal of this analysis was to compare the cause-specific survival for patients with head and neck cancers treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus non-IMRT using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results linked with Medicare (SEER-Medicare) database. Patients with head and neck cancers treated with IMRT experienced significant improvements in cause-specific survival compared with patients treated with non-IMRT techniques.

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Erratum: Improved survival using intensity-modulated radiation therapy in head and neck cancers: A SEER-Medicare analysis

      Vol. 120, Issue 11, 1754, Article first published online: 22 FEB 2014

    8. Discipline

      Diagnostic Imaging
      Intraobserver and interobserver variability in computed tomography size and attenuation measurements in patients with renal cell carcinoma receiving antiangiogenic therapy: Implications for alternative response criteria (pages 711–721)

      Katherine M. Krajewski, Mizuki Nishino, Yoko Franchetti, Nikhil H. Ramaiya, Annick D. Van den Abbeele and Toni K. Choueiri

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28493

      A tumor shrinkage threshold of 10% is a reproducible radiologic response indicator when baseline and follow-up computed tomography studies are measured by a single radiologist. Lesion location contributes significantly to measurement variability.

    9. Outcomes Research
      Survivorship care plans: Is there buy-in from community oncology providers? (pages 722–730)

      Talya Salz, Mary S. McCabe, Erin E. Onstad, Shrujal S. Baxi, Richard L. Deming, Regina A. Franco, Lyn A. Glenn, Gregory R. Harper, Alcee J. Jumonville IV, Roxanne M. Payne, Elissa A. Peters, Andrew L. Salner, John M. Schallenkamp, Sheron R. Williams, Kevin Yiee and Kevin C. Oeffinger

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28472

      A survey of 245 community oncology providers found that despite widespread enthusiasm for survivorship care plans (SCPs) among primary care providers and survivors of cancer, the provision of SCPs by oncology providers will likely remain limited unless oncology practices receive additional resources to overcome significant barriers to implementation. Tempered enthusiasm for SCPs was noted among oncology providers, many of whom 1) perceived limited value for survivors or 2) did not believe themselves to be responsible for SCP dissemination.

    10. Radiation Oncology
      Patterns of care of radiation therapy in patients with stage IV rectal cancer: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results analysis of patients from 2004 to 2009 (pages 731–737)

      Jennifer K. Logan, Kathryn E. Huber, Thomas A. DiPetrillo, David E. Wazer and Kara L. Leonard

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28467

      In the past decade, radiation therapy has been used more commonly to treat patients who have stage IV rectal cancer versus rectosigmoid cancer, no lymph node involvement, or Tis through T2 tumors. Treatment with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy is associated with prolonged survival.

    11. Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma
      Phase 2 trial of aromatase inhibition with letrozole in patients with uterine leiomyosarcomas expressing estrogen and/or progesterone receptors (pages 738–743)

      Suzanne George, Yang Feng, Judith Manola, Marisa R. Nucci, James E. Butrynski, Jeffrey A. Morgan, Nikhil Ramaiya, Richard Quek, Richard T. Penson, Andrew J. Wagner, David Harmon, George D. Demetri and Carolyn Krasner

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28476

      To the authors' knowledge, the current study is the first prospective trial of aromatase inhibition in patients with advanced uterine leiomyosarcoma. Letrozole met protocol-defined criteria as an agent with activity in patients with advanced uterine leiomyosarcoma.

    12. Supportive Care
      Tolvaptan in hospitalized cancer patients with hyponatremia: A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial on efficacy and safety (pages 744–751)

      Abdulla K. Salahudeen, Najeeba Ali, Marina George, Amit Lahoti and Shana Palla

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28468

      Tolvaptan is more effective than placebo in correcting hyponatremia among patients with cancer. The main adverse effects are dry mouth, polydipsia, and polyuria.

    13. Translational Research
      Reducing time-to-treatment in underserved Latinas with breast cancer: The Six Cities Study (pages 752–760)

      Amelie Ramirez, Eliseo Perez-Stable, Frank Penedo, Gregory Talavera, J. Emilio Carrillo, María Fernández, Alan Holden, Edgar Munoz, Sandra San Miguel and Kipling Gallion

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28450

      A theory-driven, culturally sensitive breast cancer patient navigation program for Latinas was evaluated. Navigated patients achieved treatment initiation significantly faster than non-navigated patients.

  4. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Communication
    6. Correspondence
    7. Erratum
    1. Pain palliation measurement in cancer clinical trials: The US Food and Drug Administration perspective (pages 761–767)

      Ethan Basch, Ann Marie Trentacosti, Laurie B. Burke, Virginia Kwitkowski, Robert C. Kane, Karen A. Autio, Elektra Papadopoulos, James P. Stansbury, Paul G. Kluetz, Harry Smith, Robert Justice and Richard Pazdur

      Article first published online: 5 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28470

      Pain is an important endpoint in cancer clinical trials but is methodologically challenging to measure. This article provides the perspective of the US Food and Drug Administration regarding pain palliation measurement, with examples from past industry applications.

  5. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Communication
    6. Correspondence
    7. Erratum
  6. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. CancerScope
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Communication
    6. Correspondence
    7. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content

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