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Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 120 Issue S7

Supplement: Enhancing minority participation in clinical trials (EMPaCT): Laying the Groundwork for Improving Minority Clinical Trial Accrual

April 1, 2014

Volume 120, Issue Supplement S7

Pages ii–vii, 1087–1130

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Acknowledgements
    4. Editorial
    5. Original Articles
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      Issue information (pages ii–v)

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30168

  2. Acknowledgements

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Acknowledgements
    4. Editorial
    5. Original Articles
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  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Acknowledgements
    4. Editorial
    5. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      An overview of EMPaCT and fundamental issues affecting minority participation in cancer clinical trials: Enhancing minority participation in clinical trials (EMPaCT): Laying the groundwork for improving minority clinical trial accrual (pages 1087–1090)

      Selwyn M. Vickers and Mona N. Fouad

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28569

      This supplement provides an overview of the interventional efforts as well as scientific data regarding the undertaking by the EMPaCT consortium to document the scope of the problem and the results from multiple methods of interventions for increasing minority accrual in clinical trials.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Acknowledgements
    4. Editorial
    5. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Twenty years post-NIH Revitalization Act: Enhancing minority participation in clinical trials (EMPaCT): Laying the groundwork for improving minority clinical trial accrual: Renewing the case for enhancing minority participation in cancer clinical trials (pages 1091–1096)

      Moon S. Chen Jr, Primo N. Lara, Julie H. T. Dang, Debora A. Paterniti and Karen Kelly

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28575

      Twenty years have elapsed since the 1993 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Revitalization Act mandated the appropriate inclusion of minorities in all NIH-funded research. Despite this legislation, minority accruals to cancer clinical trials persist at a rate below 5%, and the cancer burden has increased; recommendations for amelioration are proposed.

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      Perspectives on barriers and facilitators to minority recruitment for clinical trials among cancer center leaders, investigators, research staff, and referring clinicians: Enhancing minority participation in clinical trials (EMPaCT) (pages 1097–1105)

      Raegan W. Durant, Jennifer A. Wenzel, Isabel C. Scarinci, Debora A. Paterniti, Mona N. Fouad, Thelma C. Hurd and Michelle Y. Martin

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28574

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      Cancer center clinical and research personnel report unique experiences and perspectives on barriers and facilitators to minority recruitment. The input from these stakeholder groups may inform future approaches aimed at increasing minority enrollment.

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      Adherence and retention in clinical trials: A community-based approach (pages 1106–1112)

      Mona N. Fouad, Rhoda E. Johnson, M. Christine Nagy, Sharina D. Person and Edward E. Partridge

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28572

      In the Community-Based Retention Intervention Study (CRIS), the effectiveness of a community-based intervention strategy is evaluated using Community Health Advisors (CHAs). The results indicate that volunteer CHAs can be trained as research partners to improve the retention and adherence of minority and low-income women in clinical trials.

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      Five National Cancer Institute–designated cancer centers' data collection on racial/ethnic minority participation in therapeutic trials: A current view and opportunities for improvement (pages 1113–1121)

      Ernest T. Hawk, Elizabeth B. Habermann, Jean G. Ford, Jennifer A. Wenzel, Julie R. Brahmer, Moon S. Chen Jr, Lovell A. Jones, Thelma C. Hurd, Lisa M. Rogers, Lynne H. Nguyen, Jasjit S. Ahluwalia, Mona Fouad and Selwyn M. Vickers

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28571

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      For the 5 regionally diverse comprehensive cancer centers surveyed, racial/ethnic categories are similar, yet are defined differently, across institutions. Patient-level factors are defined and reported differently across centers, and catchment area definitions may not be reflective of minority cancer cases.

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      State-of-the-science of patient navigation as a strategy for enhancing minority clinical trial accrual (pages 1122–1130)

      Rahel G. Ghebre, Lovell A. Jones, Jennifer A. Wenzel, Michelle Y. Martin, Raegan W. Durant and Jean G. Ford

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.28570

      Patient navigation programs are emerging that aim to address disparities in cancer clinical trial participation among medically underserved populations, including racial/ethnic minorities. A review of the literature identifies studies that describe curriculum development, training, implementation, and program evaluation of navigation programs to increasing minority clinical trial participation. Outcome measures are proposed to assist in developing and evaluating the efficacy and/or effectiveness of a patient navigation clinical trial program.

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