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Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 123 Issue S24

December 15, 2017

Volume 123, Issue Supplement S24

Pages 4953–5189

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Foreword
    4. Introduction
    5. Original Articles
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      Issue Information (pages 4953–4960)

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.31129

  2. Foreword

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Foreword
    4. Introduction
    5. Original Articles
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      The essential role of population-based cancer survival in cancer control in the United States (pages 4961–4962)

      Hannah K. Weir and Lisa C. Richardson

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30898

      This supplement benchmarks the status of population-based survival for 10 leading cancers in the United States just prior to the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Overall survival in the United States is among the highest in the world; however, large racial disparities persist and health equity has been elusive. Further improvements in survival may be observed in the era of personalized cancer care and targeted therapies, and as federal and state initiatives seek to improve patient access to timely, effective therapies and care.

  3. Introduction

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Foreword
    4. Introduction
    5. Original Articles
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      Population-based cancer survival (2001 to 2009) in the United States: Findings from the CONCORD-2 study (pages 4963–4968)

      Hannah K. Weir, Sherri L. Stewart, Claudia Allemani, Mary C. White, Cheryll C. Thomas, Arica White, Michel P. Coleman and for the CONCORD Working Group (US Members)

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.31028

      The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention helps to support a nationwide network of population-based cancer registries that collect information regarding all patients diagnosed with cancer. These data tell a compelling story about the disproportionate burden of lower cancer survival experienced by vulnerable populations, and can be used by state and national partners to inform cancer control activities.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Foreword
    4. Introduction
    5. Original Articles
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      The history and use of cancer registry data by public health cancer control programs in the United States (pages 4969–4976)

      Mary C. White, Frances Babcock, Nikki S. Hayes, Angela B. Mariotto, Faye L. Wong, Betsy A. Kohler and Hannah K. Weir

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30905

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      This article provides a broad overview of the history of cancer surveillance programs in the United States and the use of cancer registry data for cancer control programs at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The information in this overview illustrates the ways in which cancer surveillance data can be used to define and monitor burden at the local, state, and national levels and evaluate the effectiveness of public health efforts for cancer control and improved cancer survival.

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      Public health surveillance of cancer survival in the United States and worldwide: The contribution of the CONCORD programme (pages 4977–4981)

      Claudia Allemani and Michel P. Coleman

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30854

      CONCORD is a program for the global surveillance of cancer survival. Population-based survival estimates are crucial for driving effective cancer control strategies to reduce the wide and persistent disparities in cancer survival. These disparities are probably attributable to differences in access to early diagnosis and optimal treatment.

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      Population-based cancer survival in the United States: Data, quality control, and statistical methods (pages 4982–4993)

      Claudia Allemani, Rhea Harewood, Christopher J. Johnson, Helena Carreira, Devon Spika, Audrey Bonaventure, Kevin Ward, Hannah K. Weir and Michel P. Coleman

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.31025

      Population-based cancer survival is a key measure of the overall effectiveness of health systems in managing the cancer burden. The high quality of US cancer registry data, 80% population coverage in the CONCORD-2 study, and the use of an unbiased estimator of net survival ensure that the survival trends reported in this supplement are robustly comparable by race and state. These results can be used to plan and evaluate the cancer control strategy in each state and for the United States nationally.

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      Stomach cancer survival in the United States by race and stage (2001-2009): Findings from the CONCORD-2 study (pages 4994–5013)

      Melissa A. Jim, Paulo S. Pinheiro, Helena Carreira, David K. Espey, Charles L. Wiggins and Hannah K. Weir

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30881

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      In this analysis of stomach cancer survival for 80% of the US population, age-standardized 5-year net survival remains low, but it improved slightly between 2001-2003 and 2004-2009. The differences between blacks and whites in pooled 5-year survival for 37 states combined are not large. Primary prevention through control of well-established risk factors will be an important public health action for the longer term.

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      Colon cancer survival in the United States by race and stage (2001-2009): Findings from the CONCORD-2 study (pages 5014–5036)

      Arica White, Djenaba Joseph, Sun Hee Rim, Christopher J. Johnson, Michel P. Coleman and Claudia Allemani

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.31076

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      Between 2001 and 2009, little improvement was observed in age-standardized 5-year survival from colon cancer in the United States. Five-year survival among black patients has yet to reach that of white patients who were diagnosed 15 to 20 years earlier.

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      Rectal cancer survival in the United States by race and stage, 2001 to 2009: Findings from the CONCORD-2 study (pages 5037–5058)

      Djenaba A. Joseph, Chris J. Johnson, Arica White, Manxia Wu and Michel P. Coleman

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30882

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      We examined population-based trends in rectal cancer survival during 2001-2009 in the US by stage at diagnosis, race, and state. There was little improvement in net survival for rectal cancer with persistent disparities in survival between blacks and whites.

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      Liver cancer survival in the United States by race and stage (2001-2009): Findings from the CONCORD-2 study (pages 5059–5078)

      Behnoosh R. Momin, Paulo S. Pinheiro, Helena Carreira, Chunyu Li and Hannah K. Weir

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30820

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      Some progress has occurred in survival for patients with liver cancer, but 5-year survival remains low, even for those diagnosed at the localized stage. Because of the low survival observed in all states, efforts directed at controlling well-established risk factors such as hepatitis B may have the greatest impact on reducing the burden of liver cancer in the United States.

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      Lung cancer survival in the United States by race and stage (2001-2009): Findings from the CONCORD-2 study (pages 5079–5099)

      Thomas B. Richards, S. Jane Henley, Mary C. Puckett, Hannah K. Weir, Bin Huang, Thomas C. Tucker and Claudia Allemani

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.31029

      Lung cancer survival improved slightly between 2001 and 2009 but remained lower among blacks than whites. Efforts to control well established risk factors would be expected to have the greatest impact on reducing the burden of lung cancer, and efforts to ensure that all patients receive timely and appropriate treatment would be expected to reduce the variation between states, and the persistently lower survival among blacks than whites.

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      Disparities in breast cancer survival in the United States (2001-2009): Findings from the CONCORD-2 study (pages 5100–5118)

      Jacqueline W. Miller, Judith Lee Smith, A. Blythe Ryerson, Thomas C. Tucker and Claudia Allemani

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30988

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      Breast cancer survival remained high between 2001 and 2009, but there were wide and persistent disparities in survival between black and white women. Reducing racial disparities in breast cancer survival remains a challenge that requires broad, coordinated efforts at the federal, state, and local levels.

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      Cervical cancer survival in the United States by race and stage (2001-2009): Findings from the CONCORD-2 study (pages 5119–5137)

      Vicki B. Benard, Meg Watson, Mona Saraiya, Rhea Harewood, Julie S. Townsend, Antoinette M. Stroup, Hannah K. Weir and Claudia Allemani

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30906

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      The 5-year survival for women with cervical cancer in the United States was 63.5% between 2001-2003 and remained constant between 2004-2009. However, the survival for black women was lower than survival for white women, in both time periods.

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      Disparities in ovarian cancer survival in the United States (2001-2009): Findings from the CONCORD-2 study (pages 5138–5159)

      Sherri L. Stewart, Rhea Harewood, Melissa Matz, Sun Hee Rim, Susan A. Sabatino, Kevin C. Ward and Hannah K. Weir

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.31027

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      Population-based ovarian cancer survival in the United States is moderate (at approximately 40%) between 2001 and 2009; however, large and persistent racial disparities are observed. Black women have lower survival than white women in most states.

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      Prostate cancer survival in the United States by race and stage (2001-2009): Findings from the CONCORD-2 study (pages 5160–5177)

      C. Brooke Steele, Jun Li, Bin Huang and Hannah K. Weir

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.31026

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      Population-based prostate cancer survival in the United States is high (97%) for men diagnosed between 2001 and 2009, but racial disparities persist. The percentages of both black and white males diagnosed with localized stage cancer increased during this period, however, and 5-year survival for males diagnosed at this stage exceeds 99%.

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      Survival among children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the United States, by race and age, 2001 to 2009: Findings from the CONCORD-2 study (pages 5178–5189)

      Eric W. Tai, Kevin C. Ward, Audrey Bonaventure, David A. Siegel and Michel P. Coleman

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30899

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      This report describes the survival of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the United States, using the most comprehensive and up-to-date cancer registry data covering 80% of the US population. Survival up to 5 years after diagnosis is high among children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the United States, but disparities by race exist.

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