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Cancer

Cover image for Cancer

Supplement: Eighth Conference on Radioimmunodetection and Radioimmunotherapy of Cancer

15 February 2002

Volume 94, Issue S4

Pages 1193–1381

  1. Introduction

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. Session I. Radiation Biology and Chemistry
    4. Session II. Physics and Dosimetry
    5. Session III. Experimental Targeting and Radioimmunotherapy
    6. Session IV. Clinical Radioimmunotherapy
    7. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED
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      Introduction (pages 1193–1195)

      David M. Goldenberg

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10285

  2. Session I. Radiation Biology and Chemistry

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. Session I. Radiation Biology and Chemistry
    4. Session II. Physics and Dosimetry
    5. Session III. Experimental Targeting and Radioimmunotherapy
    6. Session IV. Clinical Radioimmunotherapy
    7. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED
    1. Session I. Radiation Biology and Chemistry

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      α–melanocyte-stimulating hormone peptide analogs labeled with technetium-99m and indium-111 for malignant melanoma targeting (pages 1196–1201)

      JianQing Chen, Zhen Cheng, Yubin Miao, Silvia S. Jurisson and Thomas P. Quinn

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10284

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      Previous studies have shown that the compact structure of a rhenium-cyclized α–melanocyte-stimulating hormone peptide analog, [Cys3, 4, 10,D-Phe7]α-MSH3–13, or Re-CCMSH, significantly enhanced its in vivo tumor uptake and retention. In this study, the metal chelate 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) was coupled to the N-terminus of Re-CCMSH in order to develop a melanoma-targeting peptide that could be labeled with a wider variety of imaging and therapeutic radionuclides.

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      Comparison of the biologic effects of MA5 and B-B4 monoclonal antibody labeled with iodine-131 and bismuth-213 on multiple myeloma (pages 1202–1209)

      Stephane Supiot, Alain Faivre-Chauvet, Olivier Couturier, Marie Françoise Heymann, Nelly Robillard, Françoise Kraeber-Bodéré, Laurence Morandeau, Marc Andrè Mahé and Michel Chérel

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10286

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      Using a specific monoclonal antibody, B-B4, coupled to bismuth-213 by a chelating agent (CITC-DTPA), the feasibility of alpha-radioimmunotherapy for multiple myeloma has been demonstrated previously. In this study, the two monoclonal antibodies tested, MA5 and B-B4, target the epithelial antigens Muc-1 and syndecan-1, respectively, which are both expressed by multiple myeloma cell lines. The results show that B-B4 might be the more effective therapeutic antibody and suggest that alpha-radioimmunotherapy might be more suitable than beta-radioimmunotherapy for treating single-cell tumor models.

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      Apoptosis induced by low-dose and low-dose-rate radiation (pages 1210–1214)

      Homa Mirzaie-Joniani, David Eriksson, Ali Sheikholvaezin, Amanda Johansson, Per-Olov Löfroth, Lennart Johansson and Torgny Stigbrand

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10287

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      Low-dose (2–5 grays) and low-dose-rate radiation (0.072 grays per minute) are able to induce significant apoptosis, and apoptosis may be one of the mechanisms by which low-dose radiation causes growth inhibition of experimental tumors.

  3. Session II. Physics and Dosimetry

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. Session I. Radiation Biology and Chemistry
    4. Session II. Physics and Dosimetry
    5. Session III. Experimental Targeting and Radioimmunotherapy
    6. Session IV. Clinical Radioimmunotherapy
    7. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED
    1. Session II. Physics and Dosimetry

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      Radionuclide-antibody conjugates for single-cell cytotoxicity (pages 1215–1223)

      M. Jules Mattes

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10288

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      Radioimmunotherapy has generally been designed to target macroscopic tumor masses, as opposed to single cells or micrometastases. This article briefly reviews the evidence demonstrating that single-cell kill can be obtained with antibody conjugates of radionuclides emitting α-particles or Auger and conversion electrons, and that this can lead to effective tumor therapy in mouse xenograft models.

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      Comparison of four scatter correction methods for patient whole-body imaging during therapeutic trials with iodine-131 (pages 1224–1230)

      Grégory Delpon, Ludovic Ferrer, Corinne Lenta, Albert Lisbona, Iréne Buvat and Manuel Bardiès

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10289

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      With the geometric mean approach, quantification with calibration from an administered dose gave acceptable results for four scatter correction methods, but quantification with calibration from an imaged known-activity source was unsatisfactory, even when a sophisticated transmission device or scatter correction techniques were used.

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      The two types of correction of absorbed dose estimates for internal emitters (pages 1231–1234)

      Lawrence E. Williams, An Liu, Dave M. Yamauchi, George Lopatin, Andrew A. Raubitschek and Jeffrey Y. C. Wong

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10290

      Two types of correction for absorbed dose estimation are defined and described for use in radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy. Type I refers to generation of phantom-specific absorbed dose estimates, while Type II concerns generation of patient-specific estimates.

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      Time dependence of the activity concentration ratio of red marrow to blood and implications for red marrow dosimetry (pages 1235–1239)

      Cecilia Hindorf, Ola Lindén, Jan Tennvall, Karin Wingårdh and Sven-Erik Strand

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10291

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      The red marrow–blood activity concentration ratio is not constant; it changes with time. This has implications for dosimetry and for the optimization of radioimmunotherapy. A method for correction is suggested.

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      Biokinetics of yttrium-90–labeled huBrE-3 monoclonal antibody (pages 1240–1248)

      Timothy K. Johnson, William Cole, Robert A. Quaife, James L. Lear, Roberto L. Ceriani, Roy B. Jones and Pablo J. Cagnoni

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10292

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      This study reports summary biokinetics for 17 patients treated with huBrE-3 antibody labeled with indium-111 and yttrium-90 in a Phase I dose escalation trial. The authors conclude that biologic excretion of activity does not occur via the urine, and that biologic excretion of total-body activity is not appreciable.

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      A model-based approach for the optimization of radioimmunotherapy through antibody design and radionuclide selection (pages 1249–1257)

      Aiden A. Flynn, Alan J. Green, R. Barbara Pedley, Geoffrey M. Boxer, Jason Dearling, Rebecca Watson, Robert Boden and Richard H. J. Begent

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10293

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      A bivalent antibody with rapid clearance from blood delivered the most effective therapy to both normoxic and hypoxic areas of a colorectal tumor. The success of the therapy was highly dependent on tumor size and could be optimized by selecting the radionuclide to suit the size.

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      Volume reduction versus radiation dose for tumors in previously untreated lymphoma patients who received iodine-131 tositumomab therapy : Conjugate views compared with a hybrid method (pages 1258–1263)

      Kenneth F. Koral, Isaac R. Francis, Stewart Kroll, Kenneth R. Zasadny, Mark S. Kaminski and Richard L. Wahl

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10294

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      In the treatment of follicular lymphoma with a combination of unlabeled and iodine-131–labeled tositumomab, volume reduction of individual tumors at 12 weeks for partial responders was significantly related to radiation dose estimated by a hybrid dosimetric method; a significant relationship was not found with composite tumors and dosimetry from pretherapy conjugate views. It appeared that volume reductions from both unlabeled antibody and radiation dose were important.

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      Model prediction of treatment planning for dose-fractionated radioimmunotherapy (pages 1264–1269)

      Sui Shen, Jun Duan, Ruby F. Meredith, Donald J. Buchsbaum, Ivan A. Brezovich, Prem N. Pareek and James A. Bonner

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10295

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      A mathematic model has been developed that allows prediction of the nadir and duration of thrombocytopenia as well as the tumor clonogenic cell response to various radioimmunotherapy doses and fractionation schemes. Given a tolerated level of thrombocytopenia and the cell kinetics of marrow and tumor following radiation exposure, a dosing scheme for optimal tumor response can be determined.

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      Single tumor cell uptake and dosimetry of technetium-99m Fab′ anti-CD22 in low-grade B-cell lymphoma (pages 1270–1274)

      Ola Lindén, Cecilia Hindorf, Jan Tennvall, Sverker Segrén, Karin Wingardh and Sven-Erik Strand

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10296

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      Single cell tumor dosimetry for radioimmunotherapy may be performed after injection of an antibody labeled with a radionuclide, followed by cell sorting and radioactivity determination ex vivo.

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      Choosing an optimal radioimmunotherapy dose for clinical response (pages 1275–1286)

      Sally J. DeNardo, Lawrence E. Williams, Bryan R. Leigh and Richard L. Wahl

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10297

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      Radioimmunotherapy agents are becoming generally available for clinical use in lymphoma therapy. Debate continues regarding the manner in which this modality should be applied and how dosage should be determined for general clinical care. It is a good time to reevaluate relevant dose response information from preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy protocols.

  4. Session III. Experimental Targeting and Radioimmunotherapy

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. Session I. Radiation Biology and Chemistry
    4. Session II. Physics and Dosimetry
    5. Session III. Experimental Targeting and Radioimmunotherapy
    6. Session IV. Clinical Radioimmunotherapy
    7. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED
    1. Session III. Experimental Targeting and Radioimmunotherapy

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      Application of extracorporeal immunoadsorption to reduce circulating blood radioactivity after intraperitoneal administration of indium-111–HMFG1–biotin (pages 1287–1292)

      Zhongmin Wang, Michael Garkavij, Jan G. Tennvall, Tomas Ohlsson, Sven-Erik Strand and Hans-Olov Sjögren

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10298

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      Extracorporeal immunoadsorption proved to be successful after intraperitoneal administration of the monoclonal antibody indium-111–HMFG1 in reducing circulating blood radioactivity. Biotinylation did not significantly change the biodistribution of indium-111–HMFG1 after intraperitoneal injection in rats.

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      A novel somatostatin conjugate with a high affinity to all five somatostatin receptor subtypes (pages 1293–1297)

      Ulrich Wulbrand, Martin Feldman, Andreas Pfestroff, Hans-Cristophe Fehman, Jin Du, Jukka Hiltunen, Marcela Marquez, Rudolf Arnold, Jan-Erik Westlin, Sten Nilsson and Anders R. Holmberg

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10299

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      Somatostatin-dextran70 has a high affinity to all five somatostatin receptor subtypes.

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      Targeted radiotherapy with [90Y]-SMT 487 in mice bearing human nonsmall cell lung tumor xenografts induced to express human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 with an adenoviral vector (pages 1298–1305)

      Buck E. Rogers, Kurt R. Zinn, Chin-Yu Lin, Tandra R. Chaudhuri and Donald J. Buchsbaum

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10300

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      An adenoviral vector encoding somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTr2) was used to express SSTr2 on nonsmall cell lung tumors in mice. The tumors showed significant growth inhibition after treatment with a radiolabeled peptide compared with control tumors.

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      Idiotypic–anti-idiotypic complexes and their in vivo metabolism (pages 1306–1313)

      Amanda Johansson, Ann Erlandsson, David Eriksson, Anders Ullén, Patrik Holm, Birgitta E. Sundström, Kenneth H. Roux and Torgny Stigbrand

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10301

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      The anti-idiotypic antibody αTS1 is efficient at clearing its idiotype, TS1, from the circulation of nude mice. In this study, the complexes formed were cleared by the liver, and electron microscopy demonstrated a predominance of ring complexes, tetrameric rings in particular, as opposed to chains.

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      The combination of external beam radiotherapy and experimental radioimmunotargeting with a monoclonal anticytokeratin antibody (pages 1314–1319)

      Amanda Johansson, David Eriksson, Anders Ullén, Per-Olov Löfroth, Lennart Johansson, Katrine Riklund-Åhlström and Torgny Stigbrand

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10302

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      Synergistic effects may be achievable by combining external beam radiotherapy with experimental radioimmunotargeting using the monoclonal anticytokeratin antibody TS1, if the radiotherapy is given prior to monoclonal antibody injection.

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      Combined modality radioimmunotherapy : Promise and peril (pages 1320–1331)

      Patricia A. Burke, Sally J. DeNardo, Laird A. Miers, David L. Kukis and Gerald L. DeNardo

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10303

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      This article compares the results of combined modality radioimmunotherapy studies using four agents predicted to synergize with radioimmunotherapy. These results, demonstrating both increased efficacy and synergy as well as decreased efficacy and increased toxicity, illustrate both the potential and the complexity of combined modality radioimmunotherapy.

  5. Session IV. Clinical Radioimmunotherapy

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. Session I. Radiation Biology and Chemistry
    4. Session II. Physics and Dosimetry
    5. Session III. Experimental Targeting and Radioimmunotherapy
    6. Session IV. Clinical Radioimmunotherapy
    7. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED
    1. Session IV. Clinical Radioimmunotherapy

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      Rationales, evidence, and design considerations for fractionated radioimmunotherapy (pages 1332–1348)

      Gerald L. DeNardo, Jeffery Schlom, Donald J. Buchsbaum, Ruby F. Meredith, Joseph A. O'Donoghue, George Sgouros, John L. Humm and Sally J. DeNardo

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10304

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      Fractionation of radioimmunotherapy is a strategy for overcoming nonuniform tumor radiation doses that occur because of heterogeneous monoclonal antibody distribution in the tumor. Preclinical and clinical data have shown that toxicity can be better controlled, the maximum tolerated dose extended, and efficacy increased by multiple dosing at or near the maximum tolerated dose.

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      Radiation dosimetry results for zevalin radioimmunotherapy of rituximab-refractory non-hodgkin lymphoma (pages 1349–1357)

      Gregory A. Wiseman, Bryan Leigh, William D. Erwin, Dominick Lamonica, Ellen Kornmehl, Stewart M. Spies, Daniel H. S. Silverman, Thomas E. Witzig, Richard B. Sparks and Christine A. White

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10305

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      Zevalin radioimmunotherapy for patients with rituximab-refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma resulted in acceptable absorbed radiation doses to organs, similar to those observed in other Zevalin-treated populations. Hematologic toxicity did not correlate with red marrow or total-body dosimetry.

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      Outpatient radioimmunotherapy with Bexxar : Closed, clean air reservoir minimizes personnel radiation exposure (pages 1358–1362)

      Steven J. Harwood, Linda K. Gibbons, Pamela J. Goldner, William B. Webster and Robert G. Carroll

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10306

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      Outpatient iodine-131 radioimmunotherapy of low-grade NHL in a community hospital setting produced 12-month complete response rates of approximately 30% in patients who experienced treatment failure with chemotherapy. Administration of radioimmunotherapy using a totally closed system significantly reduced personnel exposure to radiation and potential for radioactive spills.

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      High-dose myeloablative radioimmunotherapy of mantle cell non-hodgkin lymphoma with the iodine-131–labeled chimeric anti-CD20 antibody C2B8 and autologous stem cell support. [THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED] : Results of a pilot study (pages 1363–1372)

      Thomas M. Behr, Frank Griesinger, Joachim Riggert, Stefan Gratz, Martin Béhé, Cornelia C. Kaufmann, Bernhard Wörmann, Gerhard Brittinger and Wolfgang Becker

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10307

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      High-dose myeloablative radioimmunotherapy with 131I-labeled anti-CD20 antibodies seems to be associated with a high response rate and moderate toxicity in patients with mantle cell lymphoma. Further follow-up to monitor the long-term outcome as well as systematic prospective clinical studies are indicated.

  6. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. Session I. Radiation Biology and Chemistry
    4. Session II. Physics and Dosimetry
    5. Session III. Experimental Targeting and Radioimmunotherapy
    6. Session IV. Clinical Radioimmunotherapy
    7. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED
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      Retracted: Radioimmunotherapy of small-volume disease of metastatic colorectal cancer : Results of a phase II trial with the iodine-131–labeled humanized anti–carcinoembryonic antigen antibody hMN-14 (pages 1373–1381)

      Thomas M. Behr, Torsten Liersch, Lutz Greiner-Bechert, Frank Griesinger, Martin Béhé, Peter M. Markus, Stefan Gratz, Christa Angerstein, Gerhard Brittinger, Heinz Becker, David M. Goldenberg and Wolfgang Becker

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10308

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      Radioimmunotherapy is a safe and effective form of therapy for small-volume disease of colorectal cancer and has potential as treatment for colorectal cancer in an adjuvant setting.

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