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Cancer

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Supplement: Proceedings of the Virginia Mason Cancer Center Interchange Meeting

15 August 2002

Volume 95, Issue S4

Pages 907–945

  1. Introduction

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. Original Article
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      Introduction (page 907)

      James L. Abbruzzese

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10752

  2. Original Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. Original Article
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      Gemcitabine and platinum combinations in pancreatic cancer (pages 908–911)

      Philip Agop Philip

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10757

      Over the past few decades, there has been only modest progress in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Several new agents with activity against this disease have been identified, of which gemcitabine appears to be the most promising when used in combination with other drugs.

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      Gemcitabine in combination with 5-fluorouracil with or without folinic acid in the treatment of pancreatic cancer (pages 912–922)

      Helmut Oettle and Hanno Riess

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10758

      Pancreatic cancer is one of the most frequently reported gastrointestinal tumors and is reported to have a 5-year survival of < 5%. It most often is diagnosed at an advanced stage and until recently the most frequently administered treatment for patients with advanced disease has been palliative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. However, in clinical trials, gemcitabine has demonstrated both a survival benefit over 5-FU and an improvement in disease-related symptoms in patients with advanced disease. The current review presents an overview of recently completed and ongoing clinical trials of the combination of gemcitabine and 5-FU in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

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      Gemcitabine-based therapy in pancreas cancer : Gemcitabine-docetaxel and other novel combinations (pages 923–927)

      Andrew D. Jacobs

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10756

      Since its approval in 1998 by the Food and Drug Administration, gemcitabine has rapidly become accepted as a standard part of palliative therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. In the current article, a variety of gemcitabine-based novel combinations showing promising activity are reviewed.

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      The pemetrexed/gemcitabine combination in pancreatic cancer (pages 928–932)

      Hedy Lee Kindler

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10755

      Pemetrexed (ALIMTA®), a multitargeted antifolate, has modest single-agent activity in pancreatic cancer. The combination of pemetrexed and gemcitabine is synergistic in vitro, was broadly active in a Phase I trial, and shows promising activity in pancreatic cancer.

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      On the development of gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy regimens in pancreatic cancer (pages 933–940)

      Cornelius J. McGinn, Theodore S. Lawrence and Mark M. Zalupski

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10754

      Gemcitabine has been studied as a single agent, in combination chemotherapy regimens, and with concurrent radiation therapy. Given the documented radiosensitizing and systemic activity of gemcitabine, its use in concurrent radiotherapy regimens should be viewed in the context of both local and distant disease control. As new agents such as gemcitabine are integrated into combined modality regimens, these considerations may facilitate the incorporation of these agents to maximize their potential.

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      New applications of gemcitabine and future directions in the management of pancreatic cancer (pages 941–945)

      James L. Abbruzzese

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.10753

      Gemcitabine is reported to be an active agent in the treatment of pancreatic cancer and also has been assessed as a radiosensitizer in locally advanced disease. Future directions in pancreatic cancer therapy include the development of agents that target signal transduction pathways and nuclear transcription factors based on the continually evolving understanding of the role of molecular events in carcinogenesis

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