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Cancer

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Supplement: Summit Meeting on Breast Cancer Among African American Women

1 January 2003

Volume 97, Issue S1

Pages 207–341

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      Overview of the summit meeting evaluating research in African-American women (pages 207–210)

      Lovell A. Jones, Otis Brawley, Marian Johnson-Thompson, Ngina Lythcott and Lisa Newman

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11028

      There is a disparity in the breast cancer survival rate among African-American women compared with the rate among white women. The summit meeting addressed the breast cancer crisis among African-American women by bringing together scientists, breast cancer advocates, and policy makers. The goal of the meeting was to develop a research agenda.

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      Existing data on breast cancer in African-American women : What we know and what we need to know (pages 211–221)

      Christina A. Clarke, Dee W. West, Brenda K. Edwards, Larry W. Figgs, Jon Kerner and Ann G. Schwartz

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11026

      Cancer surveillance data are the basis for much of what is known about breast cancer in African-American women, but how accurately have these resources captured the impact of breast cancer in this community? In this summary article, national cancer surveillance data bases are described, their most recent findings are presented, their limitations are outlined, and recommendations are made for improving their utility for future study of breast cancer in African-American women.

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      Ethnicity-related variation in breast cancer risk factors (pages 222–229)

      Leslie Bernstein, Cayla R. Teal, Sue Joslyn and Jerome Wilson

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11014

      Family history, reproductive factors, and lifestyle factors are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated breast cancer risk among African American women. These studies suggest that the risk factors for breast cancer among African-American women are the same as those for white women. Breast cancer risk factor profiles differ for African-American and white women, which may account for the different patterns of incidence.

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      Breast cancer risk assessment models : Applicability to African-American women (pages 230–235)

      Melissa L. Bondy and Lisa A. Newman

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11018

      Mortality rates are higher among African-American women with breast cancer compared with white women. Existing breast cancer risk assessment models may be inaccurate for this population subset, making identification of high-risk African-American women who might benefit from risk reduction strategies more difficult.

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      Breast cancer genetics in African Americans (pages 236–245)

      Olufunmilayo I. Olopade, James D. Fackenthal, Georgia Dunston, Michael A. Tainsky, Francis Collins and Carolyn Whitfield-Broome

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11019

      BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations occur in a number of African-American and African families but only a few mutations are recurrent and suggestive of a common ancestry. Therefore, genetic testing should involve searching for mutations in the entire coding region and flanking sequences of both genes.

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      Treatment choices and response rates in African-American women with breast carcinoma (pages 246–252)

      Lisa A. Newman, Richard Theriault, Neil Clendinnin, Dennie Jones and Lori Pierce

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11015

      Patterns of treatment response and recurrence rates can provide important information regarding the biology of breast carcinoma. Published data are reviewed evaluating locoregional and systemic therapy for African-American women with breast carcinoma.

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      Histopathology of breast cancer among African-American women (pages 253–257)

      Lavinia P. Middleton, Vivien Chen, George H. Perkins, Vivian Pinn and David Page

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11021

      African-American women with breast cancer have a poorer survival rate than white women. Several authors have attributed these disparate findings to a more aggressive histologic type of cancer in African-American women. However, a critical literature review suggests that the aggressive tumor histology reported in African-American women has not been analyzed carefully with respect to the age of the patient at diagnosis and the stage at presentation.

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      Mammography screening in African American women : Evaluating the research (pages 258–272)

      Beth A. Jones, Elizabeth A. Patterson and Lisa Calvocoressi

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11022

      Screening mammography has been extremely effective in increasing the likelihood of early detection of breast cancer in the general population. Factors that may contribute to race/ethnic differences in its efficacy as delivered in the current health care system are discussed in the current article. Recommendations are offered for new and continued breast cancer screening research efforts to ensure that African American women receive the full benefit of this important screening strategy.

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      Breast cancer among young African-American women : A summary of data and literature and of issues discussed during the “Summit Meeting on Breast Cancer Among African American Women,” Washington, DC, September 8–10, 2000 (pages 273–279)

      G. Marie Swanson, Sandra Z. Haslam and Faouzi Azzouz

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11025

      African-American women younger than the age of 45 years have a higher risk of breast cancer than women in other racial and ethnic groups. Research is needed to determine the reasons for this disparity in risk.

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      Breast cancer risk and lifestyle differences among premenopausal and postmenopausal African-American women and white women (pages 280–288)

      Richard A. Forshee, Maureen L. Storey and Cheryl Ritenbaugh

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11020

      Very little is known about the role of diet in the risk of breast cancer, and even less is known about whether differences in diet and physical activity contribute to the disparities in breast cancer risk between African-American women and white women.

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      Environmental risk factors for breast cancer among African-American women (pages 289–310)

      Mary S. Wolff, Julie A. Britton and Valerie P. Wilson

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11023

      Environmental exposures, although not yet clearly established in general as risk factors for breast cancer among women, are believed to play a role in the genesis and progression of this disease. Higher exposures, greater susceptibility, and increased vulnerability may pose a greater risk for African-American women compared with women of other racial/ethnic groups.

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      Quality of life concerns in patients with breast cancer : Evidence for disparity of outcomes and experiences in pain management and palliative care among African-American women (pages 311–317)

      Richard Payne, Eduardo Medina and James W. Hampton

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11017

      African-American women have higher mortality rates from breast cancer compared with white women and women in other minority groups, although they under use hospice and other palliative care services, including receiving less than optimal pain treatment. The manner and extent to which this under use affects quality of life is largely unknown, providing an opportunity for advancements in clinical care, research, and health policy.

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      Barriers to breast cancer control for African-American women : The interdependence of culture and psychosocial issues (pages 318–323)

      Jeffrey J. Guidry, Patricia Matthews-Juarez and Valerie A. Copeland

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11016

      Cultural and psychologic factors are major deterrents to participation among African-American women in cancer prevention and control programs. Culturally competent models must be developed to promote behavioral change and encourage participation in intervention strategies.

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      The perspective of African-American breast cancer survivor-advocates (pages 324–328)

      Ngina Lythcott, Bettye L. Green and Zora Kramer Brown

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11013

      To eradicate ethnicity-related disparities in breast cancer outcomes for African-American women, it is important for the medical community (clinicians and research scientists) to develop active partnerships with African-American and other breast cancer survivor-advocates to establish effective breast health awareness and breast cancer treatment programs and to develop meaningful breast cancer research programs. This article also poses questions for the medical community, framed from the perspective of survivor-advocates, that need further research.

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      Increasing the pool of academically oriented African-American medical and surgical oncologists (pages 329–334)

      Lisa A. Newman, Raphael E. Pollock and Marian C. Johnson-Thompson

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11027

      Breast cancer mortality is substantially higher among African-American women compared with other ethnic groups in the United States. Increasing ethnic diversity among health care providers, and particularly among oncologists, may strengthen research efforts aimed at eradicating this disparity.

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      Breast cancer research among African-American women : Accurate racial categories? (pages 335–341)

      Larry W. Figgs

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2002 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11024

      This essay recommends discontinuing the use of “African American” as a valid racial category in breast cancer research. A comprehensive consideration of this recommendation is vital to future cancer research.

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