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Cancer

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Supplement: North American Association of Central Cancer Registries

15 May 2003

Volume 97, Issue S10

Pages 2615–2706

  1. Supplement

    1. Top of page
    2. Supplement
    1. General Topic

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      Descriptive epidemiology of ovarian cancer in the United States, 1992–1997 (pages 2615–2630)

      Marc T. Goodman and Holly L. Howe

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11339

      Ovarian cancer is relatively uncommon, and therefore little has been published to date regarding racial or ethnic variations in the incidence or mortality of this malignancy. As the U.S. population becomes more diverse, the interest in health problems and disparities in outcomes among minority and economically disadvantaged groups will continue to increase. In this supplement, the authors focus on epidemiology, pathology and classification issues, multiple primary tumors, staging, and incidence and mortality for race/ethnic groups. The authors also focused on epidemiologic differences between borderline tumors of low malignant potential and carcinomas.

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      Pathology and classification of ovarian tumors (pages 2631–2642)

      Vivien W. Chen, Bernardo Ruiz, Jeffrey L. Killeen, Timothy R. Coté, Xiao Cheng Wu, Catherine N. Correa and Holly L. Howe

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11345

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      The authors present a summary of the developmental events and anatomic features that provide information regarding the natural history of ovarian cancers. In addition, they discuss the three main types of ovarian cancer and their subtypes, with special consideration of aspects related to tumor registration and epidemiology.

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      Incidence of extraovarian primary cancers in the United States, 1992–1997 (pages 2643–2647)

      Steven D. Roffers, Xiao Cheng Wu, Carol Hahn Johnson, Catherine N. Correa and Holly L. Howe

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11346

      The authors describe the incidence and distribution of selected extraovarian cancers (specifically, extraovarian primary peritoneal carcinoma, endometrial serous carcinoma, and extraovarian nonperitoneal primary carcinoma) by age, race and ethnicity, histology, grade, and stage.

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      Stage at diagnosis of ovarian cancer in the United States, 1992–1997 (pages 2648–2659)

      Marc T. Goodman, Catherine N. Correa, Ko-Hui Tung, Steven D. Roffers, Xiao Cheng Wu, John L. Young Jr., Lynne R. Wilkens, Michael E. Carney and Holly L. Howe

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11347

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      The current study focuses on the stage at diagnosis of ovarian cancer among white, black, Asian and Pacific Islander, American Indian, and Hispanic women in the United States from 1992 through 1997. Racial and ethnic differences in disease stage at diagnosis are discussed.

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      Multiple primary cancers of the ovary in the United States, 1992–1997 (pages 2660–2675)

      Holly L. Howe, Rachel Weinstein, Joellyn Hotes, Betsy Kohler, Steven D. Roffers and Marc T. Goodman

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11348

      The current study describes the incidence of multiple primary ovarian malignancies by race and ethnicity among women in the United States during the period 1992–1997. The authors examined the most common primary cancer combinations and compared disease characteristics, such as sequence of occurrence and age at diagnosis of ovarian cancer among racial and ethnic groups. Women with multiple primary ovarian cancers tended to be older than those with a single primary ovarian cancer. Incidence also was higher in white women and in non-Hispanic women. Among women with multiple ovarian primaries, the ovarian cancer was most often diagnosed in the second of two tumors.

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      Incidence of ovarian cancer by race and ethnicity in the United States, 1992–1997 (pages 2676–2685)

      Marc T. Goodman, Holly L. Howe, Ko Hui Tung, Joellyn Hotes, Barry A. Miller, Steven S. Coughlin and Vivien W. Chen

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11349

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      Ovarian cancer is the fifth most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the U.S. Similar to breast and endometrial cancers, ovarian cancer is more common among women in northern and central Europe, and in North America compared with Africa, South America, and Asia. In the U.S., substantial racial and ethnic variations have been observed in the incidence of ovarian cancer. This analysis substantiates higher risk of ovarian cancer among white women and women who are not Hispanic than among black, American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Hispanic women.

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      Race/ethnic variations in ovarian cancer mortality in the United States, 1992–1997 (pages 2686–2693)

      Holly L. Howe, Ko-Hui Tung, Steven Coughlin, Rachel Jean-Baptiste and Joellyn Hotes

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11350

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      Ovarian cancer is reported to be the most fatal malignancy of the female genital tract and the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths among women. In the current study, the authors describe ovarian cancer mortality by race and ethnicity in the U.S. during the years 1992–1997, a period comparable to the ovarian cancer incidence data presented in this supplement.

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      Ovarian cancer in children and young adults in the United States, 1992–1997 (pages 2694–2700)

      John L. Young Jr., Xiao Cheng Wu, Steven D. Roffers, Holly L. Howe, Catherine Correa and Rachel Weinstein

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11351

      Ovarian cancer in children and young adults is rare and consequently, little descriptive or analytic research concerning this disease has been conducted in this age group. The purpose of the current study was to describe the incidence of ovarian cancer among girls and young women between birth and 24 years of age based on histology, race, ethnicity, and disease stage. The cases were selected from women and children diagnosed with ovarian cancer between 1992 and 1997 in selected areas of the U.S.

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      Regional variations in ovarian cancer incidence in the United States, 1992–1997 (pages 2701–2706)

      H. Irene Hall, Ko-Hui Tung, Joellyn Hotes, Pamela Logan and Holly L. Howe

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11352

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      International comparisons have demonstrated high incidence rates of ovarian cancer among white females in Northern and Western Europe and in North America. To the authors' knowledge, few data are available regarding the geographic variation in the incidence of ovarian cancer within the U.S. The current study was conducted to evaluate variations in incidence rates for ovarian cancer within four U.S. regions from 1992 to 1997.

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