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Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Cancer Cytopathology

25 June 2003

Volume 99, Issue 3

Pages 129–185

Currently known as: Cancer Cytopathology

  1. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Original Articles
    1. Gynecologic Cytopathology

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      A feasibility study of the use of the AutoPap screening system as a primary screening and location-guided rescreening device (pages 129–134)

      Massimo Confortini, Lucia Bonardi, Paolo Bulgaresi, Maria Paola Cariaggi, Silvia Cecchini, Stefano Ciatto, Ida Cipparrone, Laura Galanti, Cristina Maddau, Marzia Matucci, Tiziana Rubeca, Grazia Maria Troni, Patricia Turco, Marco Zappa and Francesca Carozzi

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11077

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      Conventional reading of cervical smears and reading smears with an automated screening system had essentially the same sensitivity, although the automated system had slightly greater specificity. Even simulating the maximum workload, the cost of reading cervical smears with the automated system was slightly higher compared with conventional reading.

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      Cytohistologic correlation rates between conventional Papanicolaou smears and ThinPrep cervical cytology: A comparison (pages 135–140)

      Mary S. Chacho, Mark E. Mattie and Peter E. Schwartz

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11102

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      The conventional Papanicolaou (Pap) smear has been in widespread use since the 1950s. However, in 1996 the Food and Drug Administration approved the ThinPrep Pap Test, which was intended to be a replacement for the Pap smear. In the current study, the authors compare the accuracy of the two methods using cytohistologic correlation.

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      Significance of atypical repair in liquid-based gynecologic cytology : A follow-up study with molecular analysis for human papillomavirus (pages 141–148)

      Wai-Kuen Ng, Albert S. M. Li and Leslie K. N. Cheung

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11101

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      The significance of identifying atypical reparative cells in liquid-based gynecologic cytology preparations was analyzed, with clinicopathologic correlation and molecular study for human papillomavirus. “Atypical repair” was associated with a variety of conditions, ranging from reactive to neoplastic conditions.

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      Reflex human papillomavirus DNA testing on residual liquid-based (TPPT™) cervical samples : Focus on age-stratified clinical performance (pages 149–155)

      Venetia Rumnong Sarode, Claudia Werner, Rita Gander, Barbara Foster, Amy Fulmer, M. Hossein Saboorian and Raheela Ashfaq

      Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11190

      Reflex human papillomavirus (HPV) testing performed on liquid-based Papanicolaou smears interpreted as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions reportedly is sensitive for the detection of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions when used routinely in a high-risk, predominantly minority population. Performance appears to be influenced by age, with higher sensitivity and poor specificity reported in younger patients (ages 14–29 years) and lower sensitivity and higher specificity reported in older patients (ages 30–77 years).

    5. Fine-Needle Aspiration

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      Mammary lesions diagnosed as “papillary” by aspiration biopsy : 70 Cases with follow-up (pages 156–165)

      Aylin Simsir, Jerry Waisman, Kim Thorner and Joan Cangiarella

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11062

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      The National Cancer Institute guidelines for reporting breast fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) results endorse placement of all papillary lesions into an indeterminate category due to the overlapping cytologic features of benign and malignant papillary proliferations. The results of the current study suggest that although some papillary lesions truly are indeterminate, most can be categorized as benign or malignant based on FNAB results. A less emphasized caveat in interpretation of lesions with a papillary pattern on FNAB is the differentiation of true papillary lesions from their cytologic look-alikes such as fibrocystic change, fibroadenoma, and low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (cribriform/micropapillary), which has important management implications.

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      Diagnostic accuracy and pitfalls in fine-needle aspiration interpretation of Warthin tumor (pages 166–171)

      Anil V. Parwani and Syed Z. Ali

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11207

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      Warthin tumor is a benign neoplasm that often undergoes a host of reactive, regressive, and metaplastic epithelial changes. Fine-needle aspiration interpretation of such a tumor may create diagnostic problems if the pathologist does not have adequate familiarity with these pitfalls.

    7. Immunohistochemistry

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      Distribution of p63, a novel myoepithelial marker, in fine-needle aspiration biopsies of the breast : An analysis of 82 samples (pages 172–179)

      Jorge S. Reis-Filho, Fernanda Milanezi, Isabel Amendoeira, André Albergaria and Fernando C. Schmitt

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11061

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      p63 is a nuclear transcription factor that is expressed by basal cells of multilayered epithelia and myoepithelial cells (MECs) of the breast. The authors analyzed the immunocytochemical distribution of p63 in a series of 82 archival fine-needle aspiration biopsies of the breast (30 benign breast lesions and 52 malignant breast lesions). p63 was expressed in the nuclei of MCEs and naked nuclei of benign breast lesions as well as in MECs admixed with malignant cells. Malignant p63 positive cells were observed in 36% of the samples, although they did not impair a correct diagnosis. No stromal, neural, adipocytic, or smooth muscle cells were decorated by p63.

    8. Molecular Diagnostics

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      A single primer pair immunoglobulin polymerase chain reaction assay as a useful tool in fine-needle aspiration biopsy differential diagnosis of lymphoid malignancies (pages 180–185)

      Alicia Maroto, Jose Luis Rodríguez-Peralto, Miguel Angel Martinez, Manuel Martinez and Pedro De Agustin

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11060

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      A single primer pair polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes is a useful tool in the differential diagnosis of lymphoid malignancies in fine-needle biopsy aspirates. However, the information obtained by PCR must be combined with cytologic and/or immunophenotypic results to increase the number of lymphoid malignancies correctly diagnosed.

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