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Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Cancer Cytopathology

25 June 2009

Volume 117, Issue 3

Pages 149–235

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Fine-Needle Aspiration
    6. Original Articles
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      Brief guidance document on the appropriate use of human papillomavirus testing issued by the Cytology Education and Technology Consortium (pages 149–150)

      George G. Birdsong

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20030

      A brief, easy‒to‒use guidance document regarding the appropriate use of human papillomavirus (HPV) testing has been released by the Cytology Education and Technology Consortium. Use of this document will help in preventing unnecessary or inappropriate HPV testing.

  2. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Fine-Needle Aspiration
    6. Original Articles
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      Strategies for improving gynecologic cytology screening (pages 151–153)

      Andrew A. Renshaw

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20021

      Several new strategies for improving the sensitivity of gynecologic cytology screening are currently being investigated. Multiple methods based on the independent second review of gynecologic cases are now available and can improve the sensitivity of screening.

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      Statement on human papillomavirus DNA test utilization (pages 154–156)

      Diane Solomon, Jacalyn L. Papillo and Diane D. Davey

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20031

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      This statement summarizes the expanded role of human papillomavirus (HPV) testing in the screening and management of cervical cancer. It also highlights circumstances in which HPV testing is not appropriate and may lead to overtreatment.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Fine-Needle Aspiration
    6. Original Articles
    1. Gyncologic Cytopathology

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      The role of deeper levels and ancillary studies (p16Ink4a and ProExC) in reducing the discordance rate of Papanicolaou findings of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and follow-up cervical biopsies (pages 157–166)

      Odile David, Robert J. Cabay, Seema Pasha, Ruth Dietrich, Lu Leach, Meihua Guo and Swati Mehrotra

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20020

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      Discordant results of cervical biopsy histology after a cytologic diagnosis of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) are often attributed to sampling variation. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether deeper levels and ancillary stains reduce the discordance rate. Although there are many known causes of sampling variation, including factors related to colposcopic technique, regression of infection, and insufficient histologic sectioning, sampling variation remains a valid justification of noncorrelation in women with HSIL followed by cervical biopsy alone.

    2. Non-Gyncologic Cytopathology

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      Comparison of ImmunoCyt, UroVysion, and urine cytology in detection of recurrent urothelial carcinoma : A “split-sample” study (pages 167–173)

      Peggy S. Sullivan, Farzad Nooraie, Hope Sanchez, Sharon Hirschowitz, Mary Levin, P. Nagesh Rao and Jianyu Rao

      Version of Record online: 13 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20026

      ImmunoCyt (or uCyt) and UroVysion show promise and are gaining popularity as ancillary tests for urine cytology. The aim of this study was to compare ImmunoCyt and UroVysion with urine cytology using a single voided urine sample to determine the best method for detecting low-grade recurrent urothelial carcinoma.

    3. Fine-Needle Aspiration

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      Cytologic, flow cytometry, and molecular assessment of lymphoid infiltrate in fine-needle cytology samples of Hashimoto thyroiditis (pages 174–184)

      Pio Zeppa, Immacolata Cozzolino, Anna Lucia Peluso, Giancarlo Troncone, Antonio Lucariello, Marco Picardi, Carlo Carella, Fabrizio Pane, Antonio Vetrani and Lucio Palombini

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20022

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      Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is the most frequent chronic autoimmune disease diagnosed in the Western world and develops as a result of the interaction between predisposing genetic factors and environmental triggers. The thyroidal lymphoid infiltrate (TLI) in HT represents the substrate from which thyroid lymphoma may arise. The objective of the current study was to classify the TLI in HT by comparing the cytologic features with flow cytometry data and evaluating the κ/λ light chain ratio and its molecular assessment.

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      Cytomorphologic features of poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma : A multi-institutional analysis of 40 cases (pages 185–194)

      Massimo Bongiovanni, Leonard Bloom, Jeffrey F. Krane, Zubair W. Baloch, Celeste N. Powers, Suzanne Hintermann, Jean-Claude Pache and William C. Faquin

      Version of Record online: 13 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20023

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      Poorly differentiated thyroid carcinomas (PDTCs) are rare thyroid tumors with a poor prognosis, and the cytomorphologic features of these tumors have not been well defined. By using logistic regression analysis, the authors identified 4 cytologic features that were highly predictive of PDTCs: severe crowding, insular/solid/trabecular morphology, single cells, and high nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio.

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      The indeterminate thyroid fine-needle aspiration : Experience from an academic center using terminology similar to that proposed in the 2007 National Cancer Institute Thyroid Fine Needle Aspiration State of the Science Conference (pages 195–202)

      Ritu Nayar and Marina Ivanovic

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20029

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      Terminology for reporting thyroid fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy results has not been standardized. A 6-tier reporting system for thyroid FNA has been used effectively to determine which patients needed surgery versus follow-up FNA and also has guided the clinician on the extent of surgery.

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      Cystic pancreatic endocrine tumors : An Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy Study With Histologic Correlation (pages 203–210)

      Slim Charfi, Myriam Marcy, Erwan Bories, Christian Pesanti, Fabrice Caillol, Marc Giovannini, Fréderic Viret, Jean Robert Delpero, Luc Xerri and Genevieve Monges

      Version of Record online: 13 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20024

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      Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy has been helpful in accurately diagnosing cystic pancreatic endocrine tumors. Cytomorphologic features were found to be similar to those of solid tumor counterparts, and immunocytochemical staining with endocrine markers confirmed the diagnosis.

  4. Fine-Needle Aspiration

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Fine-Needle Aspiration
    6. Original Articles
    1. Fine-Needle Aspiration

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      The role of cytomorphology and proliferative activity in predicting biologic behavior of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors : A study by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology (pages 211–216)

      Paschalis Chatzipantelis, Panagiotis Konstantinou, Michalis Kaklamanos, George Apostolou and Charitini Salla

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20025

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      The authors investigated the role of proliferative activity (Ki-67) and cytomorphology in endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) cytology specimens as reliable predictive factors for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The findings strongly supported the routine use of Ki-67 staining in EUS-FNA cytology specimens of pancreatic NETs along with the presence of cytomorphologic features (nuclear pleomorphism/multinucleation and nucleoli) for better documentation and more informative reporting in clinical practice.

  5. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Fine-Needle Aspiration
    6. Original Articles
    1. Molecular Diagnostics

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      Molecular analysis of pancreatic cyst fluid : A comparative analysis with current practice of diagnosis (pages 217–227)

      Jian Shen, William R. Brugge, Christopher J. DiMaio and Martha B. Pitman

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20027

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      The objective of the current study was to correlate a commercially provided molecular diagnosis with a clinical consensus diagnosis in the general categories of malignant, benign mucinous, and benign nonmucinous pancreatic cysts. The results indicate that molecular analysis of pancreatic cyst fluid adds diagnostic value to the preoperative diagnosis and has high sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value for the diagnosis of malignant and benign mucinous cysts.

    2. Analytical Cytopathology

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      Toward a multimodal cell analysis of brush biopsies for the early detection of oral cancer (pages 228–235)

      Torsten W. Remmerbach, Dietrich Meyer-Ebrecht, Til Aach, Thomas Würflinger, Andre A. Bell, Timna E. Schneider, Nadja Nietzke, Bernhard Frerich and Alfred Böcking

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20028

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      The authors investigated the clinical application of semiautomated multimodal cell analysis (MMCA), a novel technique for the early detection of oral cancer in patients who have a limited number of suspicious cells. The results indicated that semiautomated MMCA may become a sensitive and highly specific, objective, and reproducible adjuvant diagnostic tool for the identification of early neoplastic transformation in oral brush biopsies that contain only a few abnormal cells.

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