You have free access to this content

Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Cancer Cytopathology

25 April 2010

Volume 118, Issue 2

Pages 65–112

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Computer-assisted Papanicolaou imaging : Another valuable tool in the challenge of Papanicolaou test screening for glandular neoplasia (pages 65–67)

      R. Marshall Austin

      Version of Record online: 24 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20068

      Computer-assisted screening is a valuable tool in Papanicolaou test screening for glandular abnormalities. Data are now available from computer-assisted screening usng both the FocalPoint Slide Profiler and the ThinPrep Imaging System.

  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      BD focalpoint slide profiler performance with atypical glandular cells on SurePath Papanicolaou smears (pages 68–74)

      Deborah J. Chute, Harumi Lim and Christina S. Kong

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20067

      • original image
      • original image

      The FocalPoint Slide Profiler does not misclassify glandular lesions with abnormal follow-up in the No Further Review category. However, atypical glandular cell cases with abnormal follow-up are not preferentially ranked in quintile 1; therefore, slides need to be carefully reviewed for glandular abnormalities regardless of the quintile ranking.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Increasing cytotechnologist workload above 100 slides per day using the ThinPrep imaging system leads to significant reductions in screening accuracy (pages 75–82)

      Tarik M. Elsheikh, Joseph L. Kirkpatrick, Mackenzie K. Cooper, Mary L. Johnson, Allison P. Hawkins and Andrew A. Renshaw

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20065

      In a longitudinal study examining the effect of increasing workload on the performance of cytotechnologists (CTs), we evaluated the screening performance of 3 CTs in our laboratory. The results of the current study indicate that increasing the CT workload with the ThinPrep Imaging system from 87 to 118 slides per day leads to a significant reduction in screening accuracy.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Malignant solitary fibrous tumor : Cytopathologic findings and differential diagnosis (pages 83–89)

      Justin A. Bishop, Natasha Rekhtman, Joyce Chun, Paul E. Wakely Jr and Syed Z. Ali

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20069

      • original image
      • original image
      • original image
      • original image

      Malignant solitary fibrous tumor is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm. Fine-needle aspiration may reveal cytomorphologic features not typical for solitary fibrous tumor; accurate interpretation is extremely difficult and requires histologic material.

    4. You have free access to this content
      The use of immunohistochemistry to distinguish reactive mesothelial cells from malignant mesothelioma in cytologic effusions (pages 90–96)

      Farnaz Hasteh, Grace Y. Lin, Noel Weidner and Claire W. Michael

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20071

      • original image

      The authors investigated the utility of multiple immunostains in making the distinction of benign from malignant mesothelial proliferations in cytologic specimens. The combination of positive epithelial membrane antigen and negative desmin favored malignant mesothelioma. Likewise, strong membranous positivity for glucose-transport protein 1 and/or strong nuclear staining for p53 favored mesothelioma.

    5. You have free access to this content
      Detection of chromosomal anomalies in endometrial atypical hyperplasia and carcinoma by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (pages 97–104)

      Junqi Qian, Deena Weber, Richard Cochran, Deloar Hossain and David G. Bostwick

      Version of Record online: 11 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20072

      • original image
      • original image
      • original image

      Multitarget fluorescence in situ hybridization appears to be useful for the differential diagnosis of hyperplasia, atypical hyperplasia, and endometrial adenocarcinoma, with a high level of sensitivity and specificity. It is also a potential tool for the early detection of neoplastic cells in endometrial cytology specimens.

    6. You have free access to this content
      The role of fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction in the diagnosis and classification of lymphoproliferative disorders on fine-needle aspiration (pages 105–112)

      Songlin Zhang, Fleurette Abreo, Mary Lowery-Nordberg, Diana M. Veillon and James D. Cotelingam

      Version of Record online: 25 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20070

      • original image
      • original image
      • original image

      The authors report that they were able to use multiplex polymerase chain reaction studies for immunoglobulin heavy-chain or T-cell receptor genes to demonstrate the clonality of B cells and T cells, and fluorescence in situ hybridization studies detected specific translocations or gene rearrangements to allow the subclassification of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION