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Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Vol. 119 Issue 1

25 February 2011

Volume 119, Issue 1

Pages 1–73

  1. CytoSource

    1. Top of page
    2. CytoSource
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
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      Wrestling over robotic surgery (page 2)

      Bryn Nelson

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20138

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  2. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. CytoSource
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
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      Neoplastic pulmonary cytology : Why All the Fuss Over “NSCLC”? (pages 3–4)

      Michael B. Cohen and Jamie A. Weydert

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20131

      With the advent of newer, targeted therapies for lung cancer the role of the cytologist is also changing. More refined diagnoses are being demanded as well as information about the expression of specific aberrant proteins. Cytologists need to be cognizant of these changes and, in particular, that the generic diagnosis of nonsmall cell lung cancer is likely to need refinement for contemporary management.

  3. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CytoSource
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
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      Anal cancer and cervical cancer screening: Key differences (pages 5–19)

      Teresa M. Darragh and Barbara Winkler

      Version of Record online: 17 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20126

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      Although anal carcinoma and cervical carcinoma precursors share certain pathogenic and morphologic characteristics, there are significant differences in their epidemiology, risk factors, biologic behavior, management, and treatment. This review compares and contrasts anal and cervical cancer screening, highlighting key differences including the efficacy of anal cytology in the management and prevention of anal carcinoma.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. CytoSource
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
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      Cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis : Pitfalls and benefits of combined analysis using cytomorphology and flow cytometry (pages 20–26)

      Martin Bommer, Andreas Nagy, Christine Schöpflin, Sandra Pauls, Mark Ringhoffer and Mathias Schmid

      Version of Record online: 24 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20127

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      Flow cytometry is able to enhance the diagnostic impact of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination in patients with suspected CNS hematopoietic malignancies. Especially in situations with doubtful morphology, flow cytometry gives additional information.

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      Endoscopic ultrasound-guided paracentesis of ascitic fluid : A Morphologic Study With Ultrasonographic Correlation (pages 27–36)

      Rooba Wardeh, John G. Lee and Mai Gu

      Version of Record online: 11 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20123

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      Endoscopic ultrasound-guided (EUS) paracentesis is more sensitive than computed tomography in detecting early ascites. A small amount of fluid can be sampled by EUS-guided paracentesis so that an accurate cytologic diagnosis can be rendered for clinical staging purposes.

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      Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of intrathoracic and intra-abdominal spindle cell and mesenchymal lesions (pages 37–48)

      Sarah M. Bean, Allyson Baker, Mohamad Eloubeidi, Isam Eltoum, Nirag Jhala, Ralph Crowe, Darshana Jhala and David C. Chhieng

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20120

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      Spindle cell and mesenchymal lesions are rarely encountered on endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and can be categorized as inflammatory/reactive lesions or neoplastic lesions. Correlation of cytomorphology and ancillary studies yields a high diagnostic accuracy of spindle cell and mesenchymal lesions on EUS-FNA.

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      Fine-needle aspiration of renal and extrarenal rhabdoid tumors : The experience of the Institut Curie regarding 20 tumors in 13 patients (pages 49–57)

      Thomas A. Thomson, Jerzy Klijanienko, Jerome Couturier, Herve Brisse, Gaelle Pierron, Paul Freneaux, Xavier Sastre-Garau, Real Lagace and Franck Bourdeaut

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20121

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      In the current study, the authors present the cytologic and ancillary techniques used to diagnose 20 rhabdoid tumors in 13 patients, review the literature, and discuss differential diagnoses and the optimum diagnostic approach.

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      Liquid-based FNAC of the thyroid : A 4-year survey with SurePath (pages 58–67)

      Caroline Geers and Claire Bourgain

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20125

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      Study results indicate that thyroid fine-needle aspiration cytology processed with SurePath is an adequate technique to accurately classify thyroid nodules. Colloid, background, and nuclear details are readily seen.

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      Improved preoperative definitive diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma in FNAs prepared with both ThinPrep and conventional smears compared with FNAs prepared with ThinPrep alone (pages 68–73)

      Martin H. Luu, Andrew H. Fischer, Latha Pisharodi and Christopher L. Owens

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.20124

      Thyroid fine-needle aspirates processed entirely with ThinPrep show no decrease in effectiveness of the screening aspect of the test when compared with ThinPrep combined with conventional methods. However, combining ThinPrep with conventional smears increases the rate of preoperative cytologic diagnosis of positive for malignancy in papillary thyroid carcinoma relative to ThinPrep alone, thus enhancing the diagnostic aspect of the test.

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