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Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Vol. 121 Issue 3

March 2013

Volume 121, Issue 3

Pages 109–167

  1. Cytopathology Help Desk

    1. Top of page
    2. Cytopathology Help Desk
    3. Commentaries
    4. Original Articles
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      Perfecting the fine-needle aspirate cell block (pages 109–110)

      Neda Kalhor and Ignacio I. Wistuba

      Version of Record online: 13 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21284

  2. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Cytopathology Help Desk
    3. Commentaries
    4. Original Articles
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      Harmony at LAST (pages 111–115)

      David C. Wilbur and Teresa M. Darragh

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21275

      The joint College of American Pathologists/American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology LAST Project provides evidence-based consensus recommendations for a unified terminology for histopathologic classification of all human papillomavirus–associated squamous lesions of the lower anogenital tract. It also includes specific recommendations for biomarker use to increase reliability and reproducibility of histopathologic diagnoses.

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      Can a gene-expression classifier with high negative predictive value solve the indeterminate thyroid fine-needle aspiration dilemma? (pages 116–119)

      William C. Faquin

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21277

      The recent study by Alexander et al validates the effectiveness of the Afirma test, and suggests a potential ancillary role for this unique test when appropriately applied in the evaluation of thyroid nodules classified by fine-needle aspiration as indeterminate.

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      Ancillary techniques on direct-smear aspirate slides : A significant evolution for cytopathology techniques (pages 120–128)

      Stewart M. Knoepp and Michael H. Roh

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21214

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      Cytopathologists are expected to have knowledge of the most relevant molecular tests to be performed on cytologic specimens, as well as the best sample preparation methods. Direct-smeared slides have emerged as a simple and highly effective method for the storage and submission of patient samples for molecular tests.

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      Gene expression array analysis to determine tissue of origin of carcinoma of unknown primary : Cutting edge or already obsolete? (pages 129–135)

      Marisa P. Dolled-Filhart and David L. Rimm

      Version of Record online: 23 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21228

      Traditional pathology approaches as well as molecular-based assays are being used to identify tissue of origin of carcinoma of unknown primary. Cutting edge pathologists will maintain their critical position in analysis of patient samples by embracing new approaches such as next-generation sequencing for optimizing patient outcomes beyond a focus on tumor type diagnosis alone.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cytopathology Help Desk
    3. Commentaries
    4. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Evaluation of p16INK4a/Ki-67 dual stain in comparison with an mRNA human papillomavirus test on liquid-based cytology samples with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (pages 136–145)

      Marianne Waldstrøm, Rikke Kølby Christensen and Dorthe Ørnskov

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21233

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      The results of the current study indicated that the high sensitivity of p16INK4a/Ki-67 dual staining and human papillomavirus messenger RNA testing in low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cytology samples were predictive of underlying high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The dual staining revealed significantly higher specificity than the human papillomavirus messenger RNA assay, especially in the group of women aged < 30 years.

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      Endobronchial ultrasound fine-needle aspiration biopsy of pulmonary non–small cell carcinoma with subclassification by immunohistochemistry panel (pages 146–154)

      Brian T. Collins

      Version of Record online: 23 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21222

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      Endobronchial ultrasound fine-needle aspiration with cell block provided a specific subclassification of non–small cell carcinoma in 85% of cases when used in conjunction with a specific immunohistochemical panel including napsin A, thyroid transcription factor, cytokeratin 5/6, and p63.

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      Potential pitfalls of needle tract effects on repeat thyroid fine-needle aspiration (pages 155–161)

      Rosemary A. Recavarren, Patricia M. Houser and Jack Yang

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21220

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      Cytologists should be aware of atypical cellular changes caused by the previous fine-needle aspiration (FNA). Although uncommon, these changes may become potential pitfalls in the cytologic diagnosis of repeat thyroid FNA.

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      Spatial spectral imaging as an adjunct to the Bethesda classification of thyroid fine-needle aspiration specimens (pages 162–167)

      Lewis D. Hahn, Clifford Hoyt, David L. Rimm and Constantine Theoharis

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21224

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      Spectral imaging was used to accurately classify thyroid fine-needle aspiration specimens as papillary thyroid carcinoma or benign goiter. The current study demonstrates the feasibility of using spatial spectral imaging as an adjunct test for the clinical classification of thyroid nodules.

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