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Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Vol. 122 Issue 2

February 2014

Volume 122, Issue 2

Pages 79–158

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Help Desk
    5. Commentary
    6. Editorial
    7. Original Articles
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      Issue information (pages i–v)

      Version of Record online: 30 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21588

  2. CytoSource

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Help Desk
    5. Commentary
    6. Editorial
    7. Original Articles
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  3. Help Desk

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Help Desk
    5. Commentary
    6. Editorial
    7. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Help Desk
    5. Commentary
    6. Editorial
    7. Original Articles
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      2013 statement on human papillomavirus DNA test utilization (pages 83–86)

      Diane Davis Davey, Robert Goulart, Ritu Nayar and on behalf of the Cytopathology Education and Technology Consortium (CETC)

      Version of Record online: 24 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21388

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      This statement from the Cytopathology Education and Technology Consortium summarizes appropriate and inappropriate uses of human papillomavirus testing in cervical cancer screening based on guidelines from the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology and the American Cancer Society.

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      Changing the cytology laboratory information system to improve cytology performance (pages 87–91)

      Andrew A. Renshaw and George G. Birdsong

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21351

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      A central tenet in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is the increased use of information technology to improve patient care. However, areas for improvement in cytology are not well defined. The cytology community must identify and ask for changes in information technology that can improve the care of patients.

  5. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Help Desk
    5. Commentary
    6. Editorial
    7. Original Articles
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      Human papillomavirus (HPV) assays for testing fine-needle aspiration specimens in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (pages 92–95)

      William C. Faquin

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21374

      Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is frequently diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration, and accurate methods for confirming high-risk HPV types in these cytologic specimens are needed. Authors in this issue demonstrate the validity of the Cervista HPV assays for identifying these HPV types.

  6. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Help Desk
    5. Commentary
    6. Editorial
    7. Original Articles
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      Cervista HPV assays for fine-needle aspiration specimens are a valid option for human papillomavirus testing in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma (pages 96–103)

      Ming Guo, Abha Khanna, Jasreman Dhillon, Shobha J. Patel, Jie Feng, Michelle D. Williams, Diana M. Bell, Yun Gong, Ruth L. Katz, Erich M. Sturgis and Gregg A. Staerkel

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21375

      Sixty-four fine-needle aspiration (FNA) specimens from patients with head and neck squamous carcinoma are tested using the Cervista human papillomavirus type 16/18 (HPV16/18) assay and the Cervista HPV HR assay (for high-risk HPV types), and the results are compared with polymerase chain reaction-based HPV results from the same tissues and with HPV in situ hybridization assay/p16 immunostaining results from the corresponding primary tumors. The findings indicate that use of the Cervista HPV assays for testing head and neck FNA specimens is a valid option for determining HPV16/18 status in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma.

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      Targeted next-generation sequencing using fine-needle aspirates from adenocarcinomas of the lung (pages 104–113)

      Hope E. Karnes, Eric J. Duncavage and Cory T. Bernadt

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21361

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      The performance and quality of targeted next-generation sequencing using aspirate smears of fine-needle aspiration specimens from a series of lung adenocarcinomas is evaluated. Next-generation sequencing of fine-needle aspiration specimens provides comprehensive and accurate genetic information that is indistinguishable from that obtained from corresponding tissues.

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      Assessment of cellularity, genomic DNA yields, and technical platforms for BRAF mutational testing in thyroid fine-needle aspirate samples (pages 114–122)

      Kathryn Dyhdalo, Stephen MacNamara, Jennifer Brainard, Dawn Underwood, Raymond Tubbs and Bin Yang

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21356

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      The correlation of cellularity on ThinPrep slides with genomic DNA yields was studied, and it was found that the recommended minimal cellularity for adequacy of cytomorphologic evaluation can also be applied to BRAF (V-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) molecular testing in the vast majority of cases.

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      Evidence for increasing usage of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL-H) Pap test interpretations (pages 123–127)

      Vighnesh Walavalkar, Douglas Tommet, Andrew H. Fischer, Yuxin Liu, Debra M. Papa and Christopher L. Owens

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21346

      Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL-H) interpretations are steadily increasing in frequency at our high-volume academic institution with a compensatory decrease in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion interpretations. Laboratories using LSIL-H may benefit from monitoring the frequency of LSIL-H usage to ensure appropriate use of the diagnosis.

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      Dedifferentiated liposarcoma and pleomorphic liposarcoma: A comparative study of cytomorphology and MDM2/CDK4 expression on fine-needle aspiration (pages 128–137)

      Adrián Mariño-Enríquez, Jason L. Hornick, Paola Dal Cin, Edmund S. Cibas and Xiaohua Qian

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21362

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      The cytomorphologic features of dedifferentiated liposarcoma and pleomorphic liposarcoma are characteristic but overlap in a subset of cases. Expression of MDM2 and CDK4 by immunohistochemistry allows for proper diagnosis of dedifferentiated liposarcoma.

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      Prognostic significance of a positive axillary lymph node fine-needle aspirate in patients with invasive breast carcinoma (pages 138–144)

      Martin C. Chang, Jaime M. Escallon and Terence J. Colgan

      Version of Record online: 18 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21354

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      A positive axillary fine-needle aspirate is prognostically significant in the preoperative evaluation of invasive breast carcinoma. This supports the use of axillary fine needle aspirate as a staging procedure.

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      Fixation effect of SurePath preservative fluids using epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-specific antibodies for immunocytochemistry (pages 145–152)

      Akihiko Kawahara, Tomoki Taira, Hideyuki Abe, Kosuke Watari, Yuichi Murakami, Chihiro Fukumitsu, Yorihiko Takase, Tomohiko Yamaguchi, Koichi Azuma, Jun Akiba, Mayumi Ono and Masayoshi Kage

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21355

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      CytoRich Red is not only suitable for cytological diagnosis and ICC, but also for DNA analysis of cytological material, and is useful in molecular testing of lung cancer, for which various types of analyses will be needed in future.

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      Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β is not a specific marker of clear cell carcinoma in serous effusions (pages 153–158)

      Ben Davidson

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21353

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      Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β differentiates clear cell from serous ovarian carcinomas and cells of mesothelial origin, but performs less well in the differential diagnosis from other metastatic tumors in serous effusions, particularly lung and gastrointestinal carcinomas.

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