Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Vol. 123 Issue 3

March 2015

Volume 123, Issue 3

Pages i–iii, 137–201

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. Commentary
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Issue information (pages i–iii)

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21539

  2. CytoSource

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. Commentary
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. Clinician's Corner

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. Commentary
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
  4. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. Commentary
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    1. Value of combined cytology and molecular information in the diagnosis of soft tissue tumors (pages 141–151)

      Jerzy Klijanienko, Gaelle Pierron, Xavier Sastre-Garau and Stamatios Theocharis

      Article first published online: 8 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21496

      Fine-needle aspiration in soft tissue tumors is one of the most performed techniques for obtaining, in a noninvasive way, optimal material for morphological, immunohistochemical, and molecular purposes.

  5. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. Commentary
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Biospecimen repositories and cytopathology (pages 152–161)

      Savitri Krishnamurthy

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21505

      The potential for biobanking of cytopathology specimen is excellent. Further studies are needed to establish definite protocols for biobanking of thes specimens

  6. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. Commentary
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    1. Cytomorphological features of ALK-positive lung adenocarcinomas: Psammoma bodies and signet ring cells (pages 162–170)

      Fresia Pareja, John P. Crapanzano, Mahesh M. Mansukhani, William A. Bulman and Anjali Saqi

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21507

      Correlation between histology and genotype has been described in lung adenocarcinomas. Psammoma bodies and signet ring cells are salient morphological features associated with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive lung adenocarcinomas and are identifiable on cytological specimens.

    2. Cytomorphologic features that distinguish schwannoma from other low-grade spindle cell lesions (pages 171–179)

      Ivan Chebib, Francis J. Hornicek, G. Petur Nielsen and Vikram Deshpande

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21506

      The objective of the current study was to identify key diagnostic cytological criteria for the diagnosis of schwannoma and to distinguish it from its common mimics. Cohesive tissue fragments with fibrillary/fibrous stroma, intranuclear inclusions, marked nuclear pleomorphism, and the absence of spindled cells with bipolar cytoplasmic processes are strongly suggestive of schwannoma and assist in excluding other low-grade spindle cell tumors from the diagnosis.

    3. Benign-appearing urothelial tissue fragments in noninstrumented voided urine specimens are associated with low rates of urothelial neoplasia (pages 180–185)

      Irem Onur, Dorothy L. Rosenthal and Christopher J. VandenBussche

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21501

      The presence of urothelial tissue fragments in voided urine specimens is believed to be associated with an increased risk of urothelial neoplasia, although to the authors' knowledge only a few studies have investigated this association over the last several decades. The current retrospective analysis of 274 voided, noninstrumented urine specimens demonstrates only a small, statistically insignificant increased risk of low-grade urothelial neoplasia when benign-appearing urothelial tissue fragments are present.

    4. Atypical urothelial tissue fragments in noninstrumented voided urine specimens are associated with low but significantly higher rates of urothelial neoplasia than benign-appearing urothelial tissue fragments (pages 186–192)

      Irem Onur, Dorothy L. Rosenthal and Christopher J. VandenBussche

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21519

      The authors previously demonstrated a small, statistically insignificant increased risk of low-grade urothelial carcinoma when benign-appearing urothelial tissue fragments are found in voided urine specimens. Comparatively, the results of the current study demonstrate an increased risk of high-grade urothelial carcinoma, but not low-grade urothelial carcinoma, when urothelial tissue fragments in voided urine specimens contain cytologic atypia.

    5. Verification and classification bias interactions in diagnostic test accuracy studies for fine-needle aspiration biopsy (pages 193–201)

      Robert L. Schmidt, Brandon S. Walker and Michael B. Cohen

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21503

      Verification bias and classification bias are common in diagnostic accuracy studies of fine-needle aspiration biopsy. When combined, these two types of bias can interact to create more bias than would be expected from each type of bias acting independently.

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