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Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Vol. 124 Issue 1

January 2016

Volume 124, Issue 1

Pages 1–69

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. A Note from the Editor
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
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      Issue information (pages 1–5)

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21669

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      2016 publication schedule (page 6)

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21686

  2. CytoSource

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. A Note from the Editor
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. Clinician's Corner

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. A Note from the Editor
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. A Note from the Editor

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. A Note from the Editor
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. A Note from the Editor
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    1. You have free access to this content
      Molecular cytopathology for thyroid nodules: A review of methodology and test performance (pages 14–27)

      Michiya Nishino

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21612

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      Advances in the molecular characterization of thyroid cancers have sparked the development of several commercially available tests for thyroid nodules with indeterminate cytology. This review provides an update and analysis of 3 of these tests: Afirma, ThyGenX/ThyraMIR, and ThyroSeq.

  6. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. A Note from the Editor
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    1. You have free access to this content
      Young investigator challenge: MicroRNA-21/MicroRNA-126 profiling as a novel tool for the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma in pleural effusion cytology (pages 28–37)

      Rocco Cappellesso, Lorenzo Nicolè, Brasilina Caroccia, Vincenza Guzzardo, Laura Ventura, Matteo Fassan and Ambrogio Fassina

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21646

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      MicroRNA (miR) expression profiling identifies the miR-21/miR-126 signature as a novel diagnostic classifier for malignant mesothelioma in pleural effusion cytology. Such profiling may be a promising diagnostic tool that could be a valid aid for cytopathologists in the distinction between malignant mesothelioma and reactive mesothelial cells.

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      Young investigator challenge: Atypia of undetermined significance in thyroid FNA: Standardized terminology without standardized management—a closer look at repeat FNA and quality measures (pages 37–44)

      Tamar C. Brandler, Mohamed S. Aziz, Constantinos Coutsouvelis, Lisa Rosen, Oana C. Rafael, Fabiola Souza, Fatima-Zahra Jelloul and Melissa A. Klein

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21648

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      Repeat fine-needle aspiration can reduce the number of patients triaged to surgery, with a significant number of cases (67.61%) reclassified from atypia of undetermined significance to a conclusive diagnostic category in this study. In the authors' experience, laboratory monitoring of the rate of atypia of undetermined significance is a valuable quality measure.

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      Variations in cancer centers' use of cytology for the diagnosis of small cell lung carcinoma in the National Cancer Data Base (pages 44–52)

      Ted Gansler, Stacey A. Fedewa, Chun Chieh Lin, Ahmedin Jemal and Elizabeth M. Ward

      Article first published online: 31 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21610

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      Cytology is an accurate, safe, cost-effective, and guideline-recommended method for the diagnosis of small cell lung carcinoma. However, cytology is used more than twice as frequently in National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers relative to community cancers centers (31.3% vs 13.2% of small cell lung carcinoma cases, respectively).

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      Suspicious cytologic diagnostic category in endoscopic ultrasound-guided FNA of the pancreas: Follow-up and outcomes (pages 53–57)

      Evan A. Alston, Sejong Bae and Isam A. Eltoum

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21611

      The current study assesses how the suspicious category in pancreatic cytology is followed in a large endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration service, its outcomes, and the predictors that are likely to be associated with the subsequent diagnosis of a neoplastic process.

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      HPV infection and p16 promoter methylation as predictors of ASC-US/LSIL progression (pages 58–65)

      Hee Lee and Eun-Ju Lee

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21615

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      The results of the current study indicate that the majority of cases of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US)/low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) in a Korean population regressed to normal and only 6.7% progressed to high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion when followed by regular cytology, and that 17.8% of ASC-US/LSIL cases were found to harbor cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of grade 2 or higher in their tissues on immediate tissue biopsy. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that human papillomavirus infection and p16 promoter methylation are valuable surrogate markers for disease progression from ASC-US/LSIL to high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.

  7. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. A Note from the Editor
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Correspondence
    1. You have free access to this content
      Why follow-back studies should be interpreted cautiously: The case of an HPV-negative cervical lesion (pages 66–67)

      Paolo Giorgi Rossi, Guglielmo Ronco, Joakim Dillner, K. Miriam Elfström, Peter J. F. Snijders, Marc Arbyn, Johannes Berkhof, Francesca Carozzi, Annarosa Del Mistro, Silvia De Sanjosè, Xavier Bosch, Karl Ulrich Petry, Mario Poljak, Carlo Naldoni, Chris J. L. M. Meijer, for the Comparing Health Services Interventions for the Prevention of HPV-Related Cancer Consortium and the New Technologies for Cervical Cancer Group

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21622

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