Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Vol. 124 Issue 7

July 2016

Volume 124, Issue 7

Pages 443–523

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. Commentaries
    6. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Issue Information (pages 443–447)

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21675

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      2016 publication schedule (page 448)

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21763

  2. CytoSource

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. Commentaries
    6. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. Clinician's Corner

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. Commentaries
    6. Original Articles
  4. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. Commentaries
    6. Original Articles
    1. Highlights for the cytology community from the 2015 American Thyroid Association clinical guidelines on the management of thyroid nodules and well-differentiated thyroid cancer (pages 453–456)

      Erik K. Alexander, William C. Faquin and Jeffrey F. Krane

      Version of Record online: 30 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21662

      The 2015 American Thyroid Association guidelines reinforce the central role of thyroid fine-needle aspiration in the management of patients with concerning thyroid nodules. Of particular note to the cytology community, the guidelines endorse: 1) nodule selection for fine-needle aspiration based on size and ultrasonographic risk stratification; 2) adoption of The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology; and 3) a role for molecular testing in the management of thyroid nodules with indeterminate cytology results.

    2. Thyroid FNA: New classifications and new interpretations (pages 457–466)

      David N. Poller, Zubair W. Baloch, Guido Fadda, Sarah J. Johnson, Massimo Bongiovanni, Alfredo Pontecorvi and Béatrix Cochand-Priollet

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21703

      The main goals of the symposium entitled “Thyroid Fine-Needle Aspiration: New Classifications and New Interpretations” are the presentation and discussion of the thyroid fine-needle aspiration terminologies most commonly used, an analysis of their respective advantages and limitations, and a statement of how ancillary techniques could reduce the number of indeterminate cases.

  5. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. CytoSource
    4. Clinician's Corner
    5. Commentaries
    6. Original Articles
    1. Histologic and clinical follow-up of thyroid fine-needle aspirates in pediatric patients (pages 467–471)

      Kristen L. Partyka, Eric C. Huang, Harvey M. Cramer, Shaoxiong Chen and Howard H. Wu

      Version of Record online: 11 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21713

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      With thyroid fine-needle aspiration, the risk of malignancy, not including papillary microcarcinoma, for the pediatric population (≤18 years old) is 2% for benign aspirates, 21% for atypia of undetermined significance, 57% for follicular neoplasm, and 100% for suspicious or malignant aspirates.

    2. Napsin A/p40 antibody cocktail for subtyping non-small cell lung carcinoma on cytology and small biopsy specimens (pages 472–484)

      Michiya Nishino, Mai P. Hoang, Patricia Della Pelle, Vicente Morales-Oyarvide, Tiffany G. Huynh, Eugene J. Mark and Mari Mino-Kenudson

      Version of Record online: 29 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21707

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      Subtyping non-small cell lung carcinoma cases into adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma can be critical for treatment depending on stage and for tissue management. An antibody cocktail targeting napsin A and p40 can accurately subtype the majority of cases of non-small cell lung carcinoma on 1 slide of cell block or small biopsy specimens.

    3. Detection of PIK3CA mutations, including a novel mutation of V344G in exon 4, in metastatic lung adenocarcinomas: A retrospective study of 115 FNA cases (pages 485–492)

      Derek B. Allison, Mohammed T. Lilo, Susan Geddes, Aparna Pallavajjalla, Frederic Askin, Edward Gabrielson, Gang Zheng and Qing Kay Li

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21714

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      Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (P1K3CA) mutation is detected in 7 of 115 cases of metastatic adenocarcinoma (6.1%). Interestingly, a novel mutation for non–small cell lung carcinoma, p.V344G in exon 4, is detected in 2 cases.

    4. Chondroblastic osteosarcoma: Cytomorphologic characteristics and differential diagnosis on FNA (pages 493–500)

      Christopher J. VandenBussche, Srividya Sathiyamoorthy, Paul E. Wakely Jr and Syed Z. Ali

      Version of Record online: 21 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21715

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      The authors identify the most commonly observed cytomorphological features in a case series of 17 cases of chondroblastic osteosarcoma found at 2 institutions: the presence of epithelioid tumor cells with round-to-oval nuclear borders, often discohesive and with a plasmacytoid appearance, in combination with some amount of matrix material. Careful review of the cytomorphological characteristics together with other clinicoradiological data can help to distinguish chondroblastic osteosarcomas from other morphologically similar entities, such as chondroblastoma, chondrosarcoma, and chondroid chordoma.

    5. Time consumed by microscopic and nonmicroscopic tasks in image-assisted gynecologic screening: Implications for workload assessment (pages 501–507)

      Andrew A. Renshaw, Dawn Underwood, Ghada Aramoni, Beverly Cash, Maureen Croyle, Dave Deeds, Sandra Dolar, Stephen Gmitro, Nancy Ray, Debbie Sabo, Julie A. Shorie, Bridgette Springer, Dana Weber Moffsinger and Tarik M. Elsheikh

      Version of Record online: 10 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21711

      Cases with and without full manual review (FMR) were found to take an average of 5.9 minutes and 3.0 minutes to screen, respectively, and 1 additional minute between slides. Approximately 60% and 30% of screening time is occupied by nonmicroscopic activities for field of view (FOV) and FMR cases, respectively. The US Food and Drug Administration/Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services workload limits significantly underestimate the time needed to screen FOV-only cases, but appear to be adequate for FMR plus FOV cases.

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      A superior method for cell block preparation for fine-needle aspiration biopsies (pages 508–518)

      Ronald Balassanian, Geoffrey D. Wool, Jill C. Ono, Jolanta Olejnik-Nave, Molinda M. Mah, Brenda J. Sweeney, Hava Liberman, Britt-Marie Ljung and Martha B. Pitman

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21722

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      In the current study, a statistically validated comparison of 3 different fine-needle aspiration biopsy cell block methods (saline plasma thrombin, HistoGel, and collodion bag) is performed. The results indicate that the collodion bag is a superior technique for cell block preparations.

    7. Comparison between cytospin and liquid-based cytology in urine specimens classified according to the Paris System for Reporting Urinary Cytology (pages 519–523)

      Patrizia Straccia, Tommaso Bizzarro, Guido Fadda and Francesco Pierconti

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21709

      The Paris System for Reporting Urinary Cytology category of atypical urothelial cells is easily recognized using the ThinPrep method compared with conventional cytospin preparation. In the current study, only the atypical urothelial cells that were diagnosed using the ThinPrep method appeared to correlate with cases that were negative for carcinoma or cases of low-grade urothelial carcinoma.

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