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Spontaneous and augmented growth of axons in the primate spinal cord: Effects of local injury and nerve growth factor-secreting cell grafts

Authors

  • Mark H. Tuszynski,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0626
    2. Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, California 92165
    3. California Regional Primate Center, Davis, California 95616
    • Department of Neurosciences-0626, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093
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  • Ray Grill,

    1. Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0626
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas-Houston, Houston, Texas 10101
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  • Leonard L. Jones,

    1. Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0626
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  • Heather M. McKay,

    1. California Regional Primate Center, Davis, California 95616
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  • Armin Blesch

    1. Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0626
    2. Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, California 92165
    3. California Regional Primate Center, Davis, California 95616
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Abstract

Little is known about molecular and cellular responses to spinal cord injury in primates. In this study, the normal milieu of the primate spinal cord was disturbed by multiple needle penetrations and cell injections in the mid-thoracic spinal cord; subsequent effects on local axons and expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules were examined, together with effects of cellular delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF) to the injured region. Four adult rhesus monkeys each received injections of two grafts of autologous fibroblasts genetically modified to secrete human NGF, and, in control injection sites, two separate grafts of autologous fibroblasts transduced to express the reporter gene, β-galactosidase. Three months later, Schwann cells extensively infiltrated the region of localized injury and penetrated both NGF and control fibroblast grafts. Marked upregulation of several ECM molecules occurred, including chondroitin and heparan sulfate proteoglycans and type IV collagen, in or adjacent to all injection sites. Schwann cells were an apparent source of some ECM expression. Spinal cord sensory axons and putative coerulospinal axons extended into both graft types, but they penetrated NGF grafts to a significantly greater extent. Many of these axons expressed the cell adhesion molecule L1. Thus, extensive cellular and molecular changes occur at sites of localized primate spinal cord injury and grafting, attributable in part to migrating Schwann cells, and are accompanied by spontaneous axonal plasticity. These molecular and cellular events closely resemble those observed in the rodent spinal cord after injury. Furthermore, as in rodent studies, cellular delivery of a trophic factor significantly augments axonal plasticity in the primate spinal cord. J. Comp. Neurol. 449:88–101, 2002. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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