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Expression of androgen receptor mRNA in the late embryonic and early posthatch zebra finch brain

Authors

  • William R. Perlman,

    1. Department of Physiological Science, Interdepartmental Program for Neuroscience and Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology of the Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095
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  • Baskaran Ramachandran,

    1. Department of Physiological Science, Interdepartmental Program for Neuroscience and Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology of the Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095
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  • Arthur P. Arnold

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physiological Science, Interdepartmental Program for Neuroscience and Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology of the Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095
    • Department of Physiological Science, UCLA, 641 Charles E. Young Drive South, Room 4117, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1606
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Abstract

Zebra finch males sing and females do not, and the underlying neural circuitry in males is more developed than that in females. Sex steroid hormones influence the development of sex differences in this circuitry, including differences in androgen receptor (AR) expression, although the role of androgens has been controversial. We isolated a cDNA encoding a portion of the zebra finch AR and used in situ hybridization to examine the spatiotemporal pattern of AR mRNA expression in the brain during late embryonic development and at hatching. We detected AR mRNA in all the major subdivisions of the brain as early as embryonic day 10. No qualitative sex differences in AR mRNA expression patterns were observed. Cells lining the ventral arm of the lateral telencephalic ventricles expressed AR mRNA on embryonic day 11 and posthatching day 1, as did cells lining the third ventricle at all three developmental stages examined, suggesting that androgens may play a role in early stages of cellular proliferation, migration, or differentiation. AR mRNA was also detected in the hippocampus, neostriatum, septum, ventromedial archistriatum, hypothalamic regions, dorsal mesencephalon, and in and around the brainstem nucleus tracheosyringealis. Our results suggested that androgens act early in neural development and therefore may contribute to the process of sexual differentiation. J. Comp. Neurol. 455:513–530, 2003. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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